Search results for 'Kate Cherry' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bette Jacobs, Jason Roffenbender, Jeff Collmann, Kate Cherry, LeManuel Lee Bitsói, Kim Bassett & Charles H. Evans (2010). Bridging the Divide Between Genomic Science and Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):684-696.score: 240.0
    The new science of genomics endeavors to chart the genomes of individuals around the world, with the dual goals of understanding the role genetic factors play in human health and solving problems of disease and disability. From the perspective of indigenous peoples and developing countries, the promises and perils of genomic science appear against a backdrop of global health disparity and political vulnerability. These conditions pose a dilemma for many communities when attempting to decide about participating in genomic research or (...)
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  2. Matt Cherry (2012). Vale Christopher Hitchens. Australian Humanist, The (105):13.score: 60.0
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  3. Christopher Cherry (1973). Regulative Rules and Constitutive Rules. Philosophical Quarterly 23 (93):301-315.score: 30.0
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  4. Mark J. Cherry (2000). Is a Market in Human Organs Necessarily Exploitative? Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (4):337--360.score: 30.0
    Creation of for-profit markets in organs for transplantation ignites in many deep moral repugnance. Proposals to broker organs have been denounced by the US Congress and professional groups alike. Financial incentives are believed to undermine consent, coercing the poor into selling their organs, violating human dignity, and improperly commodifying the human body; such concerns are held to trump the possibility of increasing life-sustaining transplants. While such views summarize the apparent global consensus which marks worldwide prohibition of the sale of human (...)
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  5. M. J. Cherry (1997). Patients, Values, and Statistical Utility. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (6):529-540.score: 30.0
  6. M. J. Cherry (2010). Parental Authority and Pediatric Bioethical Decision Making. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):553-572.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I offer a view beyond that which would narrowly reduce the role of parents in medical decision making to acting as custodians of the best interests of children and toward an account of family authority and family autonomy. As a fundamental social unit, the good of the family is usually appreciated, at least in part, in terms of its ability successfully to instantiate its core moral and cultural understandings as well as to pass on such commitments to (...)
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  7. Christopher Cherry (1984). Self, Near-Death and Death. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (1):3 - 11.score: 30.0
  8. Jonathan Westphal & Christopher Cherry (1990). Is Life Absurd? Philosophy 65 (252):199 - 203.score: 30.0
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  9. Mark J. Cherry (ed.) (2009). The Normativity of the Natural: Human Goods, Human Virtues, and Human Flourishing. Springer.score: 30.0
    Perhaps nature is simply a challenge to be addressed, overcome, and set aside.This volume is a critical exploration of natural law theory.
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  10. Mark J. Cherry (ed.) (2004). Natural Law and the Possibility of a Global Ethics. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 30.0
    Accounts of natural law moral philosophy and theology sought principles and precepts for morality, law, and other forms of social authority, whose prescriptive force was not dependent for validity on human decision, social influence, past tradition, or cultural convention, but through natural reason itself. This volume critically explores and assesses our contemporary culture wars in terms of: the possibility of natural law moral philosophy and theology to provide a unique, content-full, canonical morality; the character and nature of moral pluralism; the (...)
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  11. Tina F. Botts, Liam K. Bright, Myisha Cherry, Guntur Mallarangeng & Quayshawn Spencer (2014). What is the State of Blacks in Philosophy? Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (2):224-242.score: 30.0
    This research note is meant to introduce into philosophical discussion the preliminary results of an empirical study on the state of blacks in philosophy, which is a joint effort of the American Philosophical Association’s Committee on the Status of Black Philosophers (APA CSBP) and the Society of Young Black Philosophers (SYBP). The study is intended to settle factual issues in furtherance of contributing to dialogues surrounding at least two philosophical questions: What, if anything, is the philosophical value of demographic diversity (...)
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  12. Mark J. Cherry (2010). Non-Consensual Treatment Is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):789-798.score: 30.0
    Commentators routinely urge that it is morally permissible forcibly to treat psychiatric patients (1) to preserve the patient's best interests and (2) to restore the patient's autonomy. Such arguments specify duties of beneficence toward others, while appreciating personal autonomy as a positive value to be weighted against other factors. Varying by jurisdiction, legal statutes usually require, in addition, at least (3) that there exists the threat of harm to self or others. In this paper, I argue against embracing the first (...)
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  13. A. S. Iltis & M. J. Cherry (2010). Death Revisited: Rethinking Death and the Dead Donor Rule. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (3):223-241.score: 30.0
    Traditionally, people were recognized as being dead using cardio-respiratory criteria: individuals who had permanently stopped breathing and whose heart had permanently stopped beating were dead. Technological developments in the middle of the twentieth century and the advent of the intensive care unit made it possible to sustain cardio-respiratory and other functions in patients with severe brain injury who previously would have lost such functions permanently shortly after sustaining a brain injury. What could and should physicians caring for such patients do? (...)
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  14. Mark J. Cherry & H. Tristram Engelhardt (2004). Informed Consent in Texas: Theory and Practice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):237 – 252.score: 30.0
    The legal basis of informed consent in Texas may on first examination suggest an unqualified affirmation of persons as the source of authority over themselves. This view of individuals in the practice of informed consent tends to present persons outside of any social context in general and outside of their families in particular. The actual functioning of law and medical practice in Texas, however, is far more complex. This study begins with a brief overview of the roots of Texas law (...)
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  15. M. J. Cherry (2013). Ignoring the Data and Endangering Children: Why the Mature Minor Standard for Medical Decision Making Must Be Abandoned. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3):315-331.score: 30.0
    In Roper v. Simmons (2005) the United States Supreme Court announced a paradigm shift in jurisprudence. Drawing specifically on mounting scientific evidence that adolescents are qualitatively different from adults in their decision-making capacities, the Supreme Court recognized that adolescents are not adults in all but age. The Court concluded that the overwhelming weight of the psychological and neurophysiological data regarding brain maturation supports the conclusion that adolescents are qualitatively different types of agents than adult persons. The Supreme Court further solidified (...)
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  16. Christopher Cherry (1973). Scepticism and Morality. Philosophy 48 (183):51 - 62.score: 30.0
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  17. John Cherry, Monle Lee & Charles S. Chien (2003). A Cross-Cultural Application of a Theoretical Model of Business Ethics: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Data. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):359 - 376.score: 30.0
    Hunt and Vitell''s General Theory (1992) is used in a cross-cultural comparison of U.S. and Taiwanese business practitioners. Results indicate that Taiwanese practitioners exhibit lower perceptions of an ethical issue in a scenario based on bribery, as well as milder deontological evaluations and ethical judgments relative to their U.S. counterparts. In addition, Taiwan respondents showed higher likelihood of making the payment. Several of the paths between variables in the theory are confirmed in both U.S. and Taiwan samples, with summary data (...)
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  18. John Cherry (2006). The Impact of Normative Influence and Locus of Control on Ethical Judgments and Intentions: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):113 - 132.score: 30.0
    The study extends the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in a cross-cultural setting, incorporating ethical judgments and locus of control in a comparison of Taiwanese and US businesspersons. A self-administered survey of 698 businesspersons from the US and Taiwan examined several hypothesized differences. Results indicate that while Taiwanese respondents have a more favorable attitude toward a requested bribe than US counterparts, and are less likely to view it as an ethical issue, their higher locus externality causes ethical judgments and behavioral (...)
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  19. Mark J. Cherry (2007). Traditional Christian Norms and the Shaping of Public Moral Life: How Should Christians Engage in Bioethical Debate Within the Public Forum? Christian Bioethics 13 (2):129-138.score: 30.0
    The TRUTH is announced to creation by the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of Truth. Here, when the consciousness rises above “the double bound of space and time” and enters into eternity, here at this moment of annunciation, the One Who announces the Truth and the Truth Announced coincide completely. In the appearance of the Spirit of Truth, i.e., in the light of Tabor, the form and the content of the Truth are one (Florensky, 1997, p. 106).
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  20. Mark J. Cherry (2006). Medical Innovation, Collapsing Goods, and the Moral Centrality of the Free-Market. Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):209-226.score: 30.0
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  21. Christopher Cherry (1996). What Matters About Memory. Philosophy 71 (278):541 - 552.score: 30.0
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  22. M. J. Cherry (2010). An "As If" God and an "As If" Religion. Christian Bioethics 16 (2):187-202.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I assess Peter Dabrock's “Drawing distinctions responsibly and concretely: A European Protestant perspective on foundational theological bioethics.” I explore the ways in which Dabrock announces nontraditional Christian assumptions to guide Christian bioethics, engages the secular bioethical agenda on the very terms set by and congenial to the field of secular bioethics, and searches for insights from philosophy and science through which to recast Christian moral judgments. For example, he cites approvingly, as if they were expressive of Christian (...)
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  23. Mark J. Cherry (2009). Discourse Failure and the (Ir)Rational Politics of Democratic Decision Making. Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (1):119-127.score: 30.0
  24. Shai Cherry (2011). Judaism, Darwinism, and the Typology of Suffering. Zygon 46 (2):317-329.score: 30.0
    Abstract. Darwinism has attracted proportionately less attention from Jewish thinkers than from Christian thinkers. One significant reason for the disparity is that the theodicies created by Jews to contend with the catastrophes which punctuated Jewish history are equally suited to address the massive extinctions which characterize natural history. Theologies of divine hiddenness, restraint, and radical immanence, coming together in the sixteenth-century mystical cosmogony of Isaac Luria, have been rehabilitated and reworked by modern Jewish thinkers in the post-Darwin era.
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  25. Mark J. Cherry (2000). Polymorphic Medical Ontologies: Fashioning Concepts of Disease. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (5):519 – 538.score: 30.0
  26. Christopher Cherry (1989). Reply--The Possibility of Computers Becoming Persons: A Response to Dolby. Social Epistemology 3 (4):337-348.score: 30.0
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  27. M. J. Cherry (2009). Why Should We Compensate Organ Donors When We Can Continue to Take Organs for Free? A Response to Some of My Critics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (6):649-673.score: 30.0
    In Kidney for Sale by Owner: Human Organs, Transplantation, and the Market, I argued that the market is the most efficient and effective—and morally justified—means of procuring and allocating human organs for transplantation. This special issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy publishes several articles critical of this position and of my arguments mustered in its support. In this essay, I explore the core criticisms these authors raise against my conclusions. I argue that clinging to comfortable, but unfounded, notions (...)
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  28. M. J. Cherry (2003). Why Physician-Assisted Suicide Perpetuates the Idolatry of Medicine. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):245-271.score: 30.0
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  29. M. J. Cherry (2011). Familial Authority and Christian Bioethics--A Geography of Moral and Social Controversies. Christian Bioethics 17 (3):185-205.score: 30.0
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  30. David Cherry (2005). King Juba D. W. Roller: The World of Juba II and Kleopatra Selene. Royal Scholarship on Rome's African Frontier . Pp. Xvi + 335, Maps, Ills. New York and London: Routledge, 2003. Cased. ISBN: 0-415-30596-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):267-.score: 30.0
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  31. Chris Cherry & Christopher Cherry (1986). Near-Death Experiences and the Problem of Evidence for Survival After Death. Religious Studies 22 (3/4):397 - 406.score: 30.0
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  32. M. J. Cherry (2009). Religion Without God, Social Justice Without Christian Charity, and Other Dimensions of the Culture Wars. Christian Bioethics 15 (3):277-299.score: 30.0
    A truly Christian bioethics challenges the nature, substance, and application of secular morality, dividing Christians from non-Christians, accenting central moral differences, and providing content-full forthrightly Christian guidance for action. Consequently, Christian bioethics must be framed within the metaphysical and theological commitments of Traditional Christianity so as to provide proper orientation toward God. In contrast, secular bioethicists routinely present themselves as providing a universal bioethics acceptable to all reasonable and rational persons. Yet, such secular bioethicists habitually insert their own biases and (...)
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  33. Mark J. Cherry (2003). Scientific Excellence, Professional Virtue, and the Profit Motive: The Market and Health Care Reform. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (3):259 – 280.score: 30.0
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  34. David Cherry (2000). The Roman Family B. Rawson, P. Weaver (Edd.): The Roman Family in Italy: Status, Sentiment, Space . Pp. XVI + 378, Ills. Canberra and Oxford: Humanities Research Centre, Clarendon Press, 1997. Isbn: 0-19-815052-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):222-.score: 30.0
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  35. M. J. Cherry (2001). Foundations of the Culture Wars: Compassion, Love, and Human Dignity. Christian Bioethics 7 (3):299-316.score: 30.0
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  36. M. J. Cherry (2012). Building Social and Economic Capital: The Family and Medical Savings Accounts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6):526-544.score: 30.0
    Despite the well-documented social, economic, and adaptive advantages for young children, adolescents, and adults, the traditional family in the West is in decline. A growing percentage of men and women choose not to be bound by the traditional moral and social expectations of marriage and family life. Adults are much more likely than in the past to live as sexually active singles, with a concomitant increase in forms of social isolation as well as in the number of children born outside (...)
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  37. Christopher Cherry (1974). Miracles and Creation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (4):234 - 245.score: 30.0
    THE ARTICLE DISCUSSES WHETHER THERE CAN EVER BE CONCLUSIVE GROUNDS FOR ACCEPTING ANY MIRACLE CLAIM WHATSOEVER. THE USUAL ’EMPIRICAL’ MODEL FOR THE MIRACULOUS IS EXAMINED AND REJECTED AS VARIOUSLY INCOHERENT. THE AUTHOR PROPOSES AND ELABORATES ON ALTERNATIVE ’ANALYTIC’ MODELS, ACCORDING TO WHICH A MIRACULOUS ACT IS A "CREATIVE" ACT. THE LOGIC OF CREATION IS EXAMINED, AND FURTHER PROBLEMS ADUMBRATED.
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  38. Mark J. Cherry (2003). Review of Angeles Tan Alora and Josephine M. Lumitao, Eds. 2001.Beyond a Western Bioethics: Voices From the Developing World. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):67-68.score: 30.0
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  39. Christopher Cherry & Guy Robinson (1977). Scepticism About Scepticism. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 51:221 - 253.score: 30.0
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  40. Jonathan Westphal & Christopher Cherry (1991). On Value and Value: A Reply to Quentin Smith. Philosophy 66 (258):525 - 526.score: 30.0
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  41. Christopher Cherry (1974). Describing, Evaluating, and Moral Conclusions. Mind 83 (331):341-354.score: 30.0
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  42. M. J. Cherry (2010). The Illusion of Consensus: Harvesting Human Organs From Prisoners Convicted of Capital Crimes. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):220-222.score: 30.0
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  43. Christopher Cherry (1974). The Limits of Defeasibility. Analysis 34 (3):101 - 107.score: 30.0
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  44. Mark J. Cherry (2005). The Market and Medical Innovation: Human Passions and Medical Advancement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (6):555 – 569.score: 30.0
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  45. Mark J. Cherry (2002). The Search for a Global Bioethics: Fraudulent Claims and False Promises. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (6):683 – 698.score: 30.0
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  46. Laura Jane Bishop, M. Nichelle Cherry & Martina Darragh (1999). Organizational Ethics and Health Care: Expanding Bioethics to the Institutional Arena. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):189-208.score: 30.0
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  47. Mark J. Cherry (2012). Conscience Clauses, the Refusal to Treat, and Civil Disobedience—Practicing Medicine as a Christian in a Hostile Secular Moral Space. Christian Bioethics 18 (1):1-14.score: 30.0
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  48. Christopher Cherry (1975). Games and Language. Mind 84 (336):528-547.score: 30.0
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  49. David Cherry (2006). Khanoussi (M.), Ruggeri (P.), Vismara (C.) L'Africa romana. Ai confini dell'Impero: contatti, scambi, conflitti. Atti del XV convegno di studio, Tozeur, 11-15 dicembre 2002 . In three volumes. (Collana del Dipartimento di Storia dell'Università degli studi di Sassari, Nuova Serie, 21.) Pp. 2119, maps, ills. Rome: Carocci editore, 2004. Paper, €107.53. ISBN: 88-430-3195-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):180-.score: 30.0
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  50. M. J. Cherry (2008). Moral Ambiguity, Christian Sectarianism, and Personal Repentance: Reflections on Richard McCormick's Moral Theology. Christian Bioethics 14 (3):283-301.score: 30.0
    This article raises three challenges to Richard McCormick's proportionalism. First, adequately to judge proportionate reason requires the specification of a particular background moral content and metaphysical context. Absent such specification, evaluation of proportionate reason is inherently and deeply ambiguous. Second, to resolve such ambiguity and yet remain Christian, proportionalism must adopt a forthrightly Christian moral content set within a straightforwardly Christian metaphysics. This move will, however, set Christian bioethics off as sectarian—a conclusion McCormick wishes to avoid. Third, even if proportionalism (...)
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