Search results for 'Katharine Bath' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Katharine Bath (1979). Promises and Assertions. Philosophia 8 (4):519-547.
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  2.  1
    Kent Bath (1994). Conversational Implicature. Mind and Language 9 (2):125-162.
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  3.  8
    M. Swiderski Deborah, M. Ettinger Katharine, Nancy Mayris Webber & N. Dubler (2010). The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 22 (1).
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the “QI tool”, to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process was marked by resistance and disagreement, it (...)
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  4.  2
    Caroline Bath (2011). Whose Childhood Is It? The Roles of Children, Adults and Policy Makers. Edited by R. Eke, H. Butcher and M. Lee. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (2):210-211.
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  5. Caroline Bath (2011). Whose Childhood Is It? The Roles of Children, Adults and Policy Makers. Edited by R. Eke, H. Butcher and M. Lee: Pp. 197. London: Continuum. 2009.£ 19.99 (Pbk). ISBN 9780826499813. [REVIEW] British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (2):210-211.
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  6. T. Katharine (2009). Performative Space and Garden Transgressions in Tacitus' Death of Messalina. American Journal of Philology 130 (4):595-624.
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  7.  39
    Anne McTaggart (2012). What Women Want?: Mimesis and Gender in Chaucer's Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale. Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 19 (1):41-67.
    But nathelees, syn I knowe youre delit, / I shal fulfille youre worldly appetit.1 Chaucer’s Wife of Bath centers on a wonderfully fruitful paradox: she claims for women and for herself the right to “maistrie” and “sovereynetee” in marriage, but she does so by articulating the discourse imparted to her by the “auctoritee” of anti-feminism.2 Indeed, this paradoxical challenge to and reiteration of anti-feminist ideas has left Chaucer’s readers debating for decades which way the irony cuts: is the Wife (...)
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  8.  23
    John Sutton (1999). Review of Lorraine Daston & Katharine Park, Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750. [REVIEW] Times Literary Supplement 5001.
    Curious about the nature of light, Robert Boyle spent a series of late nights taking detailed observations of shining veal shanks, stinking fish, pieces of rotten wood which glowed in the dark, and a ‘noctiluca’ distilled from human urine. Once, report Lorraine Daston and Katharine Park, with "only a foot-boy" to assist him, Boyle put a luminous diamond to the nocturnal test, "plunging it into oil and acid, spitting on it, and ‘taking it into bed with me, and holding (...)
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  9.  3
    Pedro Mantas España (2000). Adelardo de Bath: Sobre lo idéntico y lo diferente. Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 7:163-180.
    Traducción anotada de Pedro Mantas España. Continuación de la traducción de esta obra de Adelardo de Bath, cuya primera parte apareció en el número anterior de esta misma Revista.
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  10.  4
    Richard Seaford (1984). The Last Bath of Agamemnon. Classical Quarterly 34 (02):247-.
    Most of the work done on tracing persistent themes and images in the Oresteia has failed to take account of the associations of the theme or image for the original audience. Some of these associations are with certain highly emotional rituals. In evoking the ritual the poet evokes also some at least of the emotion which generally accompanies its performance. I will take here as an example the association of the manner of Agamemnon's death, the fatal bath and the (...)
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  11. Interdisciplinary Humanities Center & Santa Barbara March (2001). Animals in History And Culture. Faculty of Humanities, Bath Spa University College. July 3-4, 2000 Representing Animals. Center for Twentieth Century Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. April 13-15, 2000 Thresholds of Identity in Human-Animal Relationships: An Interdisciplinary Colloquium. [REVIEW] Society and Animals 9 (3).
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  12.  12
    Michel Callon & Bruno Latour (1992). Don't Throw the Baby Out with the Bath School! A Reply to Collins and Yearley. In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press 343--368.
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  13.  44
    Ameur Dhahri (2009). Low Density Limit and the Quantum Langevin Equation for the Heat Bath. In Institute of Physics Krzysztof Stefanski (ed.), Open Systems and Information Dynamics. World Scientific Publishing Company 16--04.
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  14.  62
    Helen Morris Cartwright (1965). Heraclitus and the Bath Water. Philosophical Review 74 (4):466-485.
  15. Bruno Latour (1996). Do Scientific Objects Have a History? Pasteur and Whitehead in a Bath of Lactic Acid. Common Knowledge 5:76-91.
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  16.  9
    S. Kerrison (2005). The Reform of UK Research Ethics Committees: Throwing the Baby Out with the Bath Water? Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (8):487-489.
    On 1 May 2004 research ethics committees became legally accountable to a new government body, the United Kingdom Ethics Committee Authority. This marks the end of the self regulation of research ethics. This paper describes how this change in research ethics committee status has come about and explores the implications for research subjects, researchers, institutions, and for regulation of research.
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  17.  24
    Joan E. Cook (forthcoming). Book Review: Ruth by Katharine Doob Sakenfeld Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching., Louisville. 1999. 103 Pp. $21.95 (Cloth). ISBN 0-0842-3149-4.; Ruth and Esther by Tod Linafelt and Timothy K. Beal, Berit Olam: Studies in Hebrew Narrative and Poetry. Liturgical Press, Collegeville, 1999. 267 Pp. $34.95 (Cloth). ISBN 0-8146-5045-7. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (2):188-190.
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  18.  3
    H. El-Wakeel (2006). What Do Patients Really Want to Know in an Informed Consent Procedure? A Questionnaire-Based Survey of Patients in the Bath Area, UK. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):612-616.
    Background: Medical decision making is based on patient autonomy and informed consent, which is an integral part of medical ethics, risk management and clinical governance. Consent to treatment has been extensively discussed, but the viewpoint of patients is not well represented. A new consent form was introduced by the Department of Health in 2001.Aims: To determine the information most important to patients, to facilitate evidence-based guidelines and to provide a valid and reliable consent-procedure-satisfaction questionnaire.Methods: (...)
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  19.  8
    Don Edwards (1987). The First Translation of Euclid's Elements Commonly Ascribed to Adelard of Bath. Ancient Philosophy 7:261-264.
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  20.  3
    Jacob E. Kurlander, Karine Morin & Matthew K. Wynia (2004). The Social-Contract Model of Professionalism: Baby or Bath Water? American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):33-36.
  21.  7
    Cecile Stoller Margulies (1962). The Marriages and the Wealth of the Wife of Bath. Mediaeval Studies 24 (1):210-216.
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  22. Peter T. Rudd (2002). The Clinical Ethics Committee at the Royal United Hospital — Bath, England. HEC Forum 14 (1):37-44.
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  23.  5
    Michelle Henning (2007). The Pig in the Bath: New Materialisms and Cultural Studies. Radical Philosophy 145:11-19.
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  24.  25
    Julie Wallbank (1999). “Throwing Baby Out with the Bath Water#X201d;: Some Reflections on the Evolution of Reproductive Technology}. Res Publica 5 (1):45-65.
    This article discusses section 156 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 which prohibits the use of eggs from aborted female foetuses for the purposes of reproduction. I argue that the pre-legislative debates focus only on the biological relationship between the aborted foetus and any ensuing child and foreclose the possibility of useful discussion about the potential merits of such technology. Kristeva's theory of abjection has been used in order to elucidate the strength of feeling about the use (...)
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  25.  2
    Tina Stiefel (1997). Louise Cochrane, Adelard of Bath: The First English Scientist. London: British Museum Press, 1994. Pp. X, 125 Plus 10 Black-and-White Illustrations; 1 Table and Diagrams. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (3):806-806.
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  26.  5
    Dennis W. Cashman (1989). Katharine Simms, From Kings to Warlords: The Changing Political Structure of Gaelic Ireland in the Later Middle Ages.(Studies in Celtic History, 7.) Woodbridge, Suffolk; and Wolfeboro, NH: Boydell Press, 1987. Pp. Ix, 191. $35. [REVIEW] Speculum 64 (4):1037-1039.
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  27.  6
    Andreas Speer (2000). Charles Burnett, Italo Ronca, Pedro Mantas España, Baudouin van den Abeele , Adelard of Bath. Conversations with His Nephew: On the Same and the Different, Questions on Natural Science, and On Birds £ 50.00 ISBN 0 521 39471 6. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 5 (1):104-106.
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  28.  13
    M. Sheets-Johnstone (2002). Katharine Young, Presence in the Flesh. Human Studies 25 (2):233-239.
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  29.  4
    J. Aronson, E. Dietrich & E. Way (1992). Throwing the Conscious Baby Out with the Cartesian Bath Water. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):202-203.
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  30.  4
    M. A. Stewart (1978). A Sketch of the Character of Mr. Hume, and Diary of a Journey From Morpeth to Bath, 23 April - 1 May 1776. Hume Studies 4 (2):77-78.
  31.  1
    Marshall Clagett (1985). The First Translation of Euclid's Elements, Commonly Ascribed to Adelard of Bath. Books I-VIII and Books X.36-XV.2 by Euclid; H. L. L. Busard. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 76:267-268.
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  32.  1
    Mark Wagner (1992). Keeping the Bath Water Along with the Baby: Context Effects Represent a Challenge, Not a Mortal Wound, to the Body of Psychophysics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):585-586.
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  33.  10
    Douglas J. Stewart (1972). Socrates' Last Bath. Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (3):253-259.
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  34.  2
    Julian D. Richards (2013). Mark A. Brisbane, Nikolaj A. Makarov, and Evgenij N. Nosov, Eds., The Archaeology of Medieval Novgorod in Context: Studies in Centre/Periphery Relations. Translations by Katharine Judelson. (The Archaeology of Medieval Novgorod 4.) Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2012. Pp. Xxviii, 500; Black-and-White Figures Plus CD-ROM. $120. ISBN: 9781842172780. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (4):1069-1071.
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  35.  8
    Sarah Sorial (2011). Katharine Gelber, Speech Matters: Getting Free Speech Right (St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 2011), ISBN 978-0-7022-3873-4, 215 Pages, $34.95 (AUD). [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 12 (2):270-273.
    Reviewed by: Sarah Sorial, Faculty of Law/Faculty of Arts (Philosophy), The University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. E-mail: sarahs@uow.edu.au.
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  36.  2
    Marshall Clagett (1953). The Medieval Latin Translations From the Arabic of the Elements of Euclid, with Special Emphasis on the Versions of Adelard of Bath. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 44:16-42.
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  37.  3
    Laurence Moulinier-Brogi (2012). Katharine Park, Secrets de femmes. Le genre, la dissection et les origines de la dissection humaine. Clio 1:01-01.
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  38.  1
    J. A. Bennett (1979). Science and Music in Eighteenth-Century Bath. An Exhibition in the Holburne of Menstrie Museum, Bath, 22 September 1977–29 December 1977. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 12 (1):104-104.
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  39.  2
    Lamar Ronald Lacy (1990). Aktaion and a Lost 'Bath of Artemis'. Journal of Hellenic Studies 110:26-42.
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  40.  1
    Chris Klassen (2014). Katharine Wilkinson: Between God and Green: How Evangelicals Are Cultivating a Middle Ground on Climate Change. Environmental Ethics 36 (4):505-506.
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  41. Donald M. MacKinnon (1988). Katharine Rose Hanley, A Study in the Theatre and Philosophy of Gabriel Marcel Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (9):344-346.
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  42.  7
    Sydney Anglo (1963). The London Pageants for the Reception of Katharine of Aragon: November 1501. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 26 (1/2):53-89.
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  43.  3
    Rudolf Wittkower (1943). Federico Zuccari and John Wood of Bath. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 6:220-222.
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  44.  2
    M. Sheets‐Johnstone (2002). Katharine Young, Presence in the Flesh. Human Studies 25 (2):233-239.
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  45.  2
    Thomas F. Glick (2001). Adelard of Bath, Adelard of Bath, Conversations with His Nephew:“On the Same and the Different,”“Questions on Natural Science,” and “On Birds,” Ed. And Trans. Charles Burnett with Italo Ronca, Pedro Mantas España, and Baudouin van den Abeele.(Cambridge Medieval Classics, 9.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. Lii, 287; Black-and-White Frontispiece Facsimile, Black-and-White Facsimiles, and Diagrams. $80. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (1):127-128.
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  46.  2
    Emily Plec (2005). Katharine Jones on American Anglophilia. American Journal of Semiotics 21 (1/4):130-132.
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  47.  2
    Linda R. Hirshman (1994). Book Review:Feminist Legal Theory: Essays in Law and Gender. Katharine Bartlett, Rosanne Kennedy. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (3):639-.
  48.  2
    G. R. Parpulov (2010). Mark Brisbane and Jon Hather, Eds., Wood Use in Medieval Novgorod. With Russian Translations by Katharine Judelson.(The Archaeology of Medieval Novgorod, 2.) Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2007. Pp. Xxii, 470 Plus CD-ROM; Many Black-and-White Figures, Tables, and Charts. $120. Distributed in North America by the David Brown Book Co., 28 Main St., Oakville, CT 06779. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (3):645-646.
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  49.  2
    R. P. Wright (1973). Roman Bath Barry Cunliffe: Roman Bath Discovered. Pp. Xv+108; 44 Plates, 41 Figs. London: Routledge, 1971. Cloth, £5·25. The Classical Review 23 (02):262-264.
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  50.  5
    John J. Wynne (1940). Katharine Tekakwitha. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):495-496.
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