Search results for 'Katherine Preston' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Massimo Pigliucci & Katherine Preston (eds.) (2004). Phenotypic Integration: Studying the Ecology and Evolution of Complex Phenotypes. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    A new voice in the nature-nurture debate can be heard at the interface between evolution and development. Phenotypic integration is a major growth area in research.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Katherine A. Preston & David D. Ackerly (2004). The Evolution of Allometry in Modular Organisms. In Massimo Pigliucci & Katherine Preston (eds.), Phenotypic Integration: Studying the Ecology and Evolution of Complex Phenotypes. Oxford University Press. 80--106.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christopher J. Preston (2007). Wayne Ouderkirkand Christopher J. Preston. In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, Iii. Springer. 8.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Diana Preston (2005). Before the Fall-Out: The Human Chain Reaction From Marie Curie to Hiroshima. Doubleday.score: 60.0
    A history of the Atomic Bomb from Marie Curie to Hiroshima. “I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds” — Oppenheimer quoting the Bhagavad Gita after witnessing the successful demonstration of the atom bomb. The bomb, which killed an estimated 140,000 civilians in Hiroshima and destroyed the countryside for miles around, was one of the defining moments in world history. That mushroom cloud cast a terrifying shadow over the contemporary world and continues to do so today. But how could this (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.) (2002). Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The most famous challenge to computational cognitive science and artificial intelligence is the philosopher John Searle's "Chinese Room" argument.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ted M. Preston & Scott Dixon (2007). Who Wants to Live Forever? Immortality, Authenticity, and Living Forever in the Present. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (2):99 - 117.score: 30.0
    Death is a bad thing by virtue of its ability to frustrate the subjectively valuable projects that shape our identities and render our lives meaningful. While the presumption that immortality would necessarily result in boredom worse than death proves unwarranted, if the constraint of mortality is a necessary element for virtues, relationships, and motivation to pursue our life-projects, then death might nevertheless be a necessary evil. Mortal or immortal, it’s clear that the value of one’s life depends on its subjectively (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Paul Feyerabend, John Preston, Gonzalo Munévar & David Lamb (eds.) (2000). The Worst Enemy of Science?: Essays in Memory of Paul Feyerabend. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This stimulating collection is devoted to the life and work of the most flamboyant of twentieth-century philosophers, Paul Feyerabend. Feyerabend's radical epistemological claims, and his stunning argument that there is no such thing as scientific method, were highly influential during his life and have only gained attention since his death in 1994. The essays that make up this volume, written by some of today's most respected philosophers of science, many of whom knew Feyerabend as students and colleagues, cover the diverse (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John Preston (1995). Has Poincar�'s Conventionalism Been Refuted? Ratio 8 (2):193-200.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Beth Preston (1998). Why is a Wing Like a Spoon? A Pluralist Theory of Function. Journal of Philosophy 95 (5):215-254.score: 30.0
    Function theorists routinely speculate that a viable function theory will be equally applicable to biological traits and artifacts. However, artifact function has received only the most cursory scrutiny in its own right. Closer scrutiny reveals that only a pluralist theory comprising two distinct notions of function--proper function and system function--will serve as an adequate general theory. The first section describes these two notions of function. The second section shows why both notions are necessary, by showing that attempts to do away (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ted M. Preston (2003). The Stoic Samurai. Asian Philosophy 13 (1):39 – 52.score: 30.0
    In Philosophy as a Way of Life, Pierre Hadot discusses the understanding of philosophy held by the Greco-Roman ancients. Philosophy was not understood only as an exegetical or analytical exercise, but as a spiritual practice - a way of life. Becoming a member of a philosophical school was tantamount to a religious conversion involving one's entire self. To make one's doctrines 'ready to hand' required a number of 'spiritual exercises' which, if regularly followed, were intended to evince such a transformation. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Beth Preston (1993). Heidegger and Artificial Intelligence. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (1):43-69.score: 30.0
  12. John Preston (2003). Kuhn, Instrumentalism, and the Progress of Science. Social Epistemology 17 (2-3):259-265.score: 30.0
  13. Beth Preston (1994). Behaviorism and Mentalism: Is There a Third Alternative? Synthese 100 (2):167-96.score: 30.0
    Behaviorism and mentalism are commonly considered to be mutually exclusive and conjunctively exhaustive options for the psychological explanation of behavior. Behaviorism and mentalism do differ in their characterization of inner causes of behavior. However, I argue that they are not mutually exclusive on the grounds that they share important foundational assumptions, two of which are the notion of an innerouter split and the notion of control. I go on to argue that mentalism and behaviorism are not conjunctively exhaustive either, on (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Beth Preston (2008). Review of Eric Margolis, Stephen Laurence (Eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representation. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. Preston (2010). Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind * By ROBERT D. RUPERT. Analysis 70 (4):798-800.score: 30.0
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. John Preston (2006). Janik on Hertz and the Early Wittgenstein. Grazer Philosophische Studien 73 (1):83-95.score: 30.0
    Various claims have been made about the influence of Heinrich Hertz's Principles of Mechanics on Wittgenstein's work. I consider some such recent claims, made by Allan Janik, to the effect that Hertz exercised a very strong influence on Wittgenstein, early and late. I suggest they are ill-founded, in virtue of misinterpretations either of Hertz, or of Wittgenstein, or of both. I try to set the record straight on issues such as the three criteria Hertz suggests for evaluating scientific 'representations' [Darstellungen] (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jesse Preston, Kurt Gray & Daniel M. Wegner (2006). The Godfather of Soul. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):482-+.score: 30.0
    An important component of souls is the capacity for free will, as the origin of agency within an individual. Belief in souls arises in part from the experience of conscious will, a compelling feeling of personal causation that accompanies almost every action we take, and suggests that an immaterial self is in charge of the physical body.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Beth Preston (2002). Review: What Functions Explain: Functional Explanation and Self-Reproducing Systems. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (444):888-891.score: 30.0
  19. Beth Preston (1998). Cognition and Tool Use. Mind and Language 13 (4):513–547.score: 30.0
    Tool use rivals language as an important domain of cognitive phenomena, and so as a source of insight into the nature of cognition in general. But the favoured current definition of tool use is inadequate because it does not carve the phenomena of interest at the joints. Heidegger's notion of equipment provides a more adequate theoretical framework. But Heidegger's account leads directly to a non-individualist view of the nature of cognition. Thus non-individualism is supported by concrete considerations about the nature (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. John M. Preston (1989). Folk Psychology as Theory or Practice? The Case for Eliminative Materialism. Inquiry 32 (September):277-303.score: 30.0
    One foundation of Eliminative Materialism is the claim that the totality of our ordinary resources for explaining and predicting behaviour, ?Folk Psychology?, constitutes a theoretical scheme, potentially in conflict with other theories of behaviour. Recent attacks upon this claim, as well as the defence by Paul Churchland, are examined and found to be lacking in a suitably realistic conception of theory. By finding such a conception, and by correctly identifying the level of conceptual structures within which Folk Psychology is located, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Stephanie D. Preston & Frans B. M. de Waal (2001). Empathy: Each is in the Right – Hopefully, Not All in the Wrong. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):49-58.score: 30.0
    Only a broad theory that looks across levels of analysis can encompass the many perspectives on the phenomenon of empathy. We address the major points of our commentators by emphasizing that the basic perception-action process, while automatic, is subject to control and modulation, and is greatly affected by experience and context because of the role of representations. The model can explain why empathy seems phenomenologically more effortful than reflexive, and why there are different levels of empathy across (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Stephanie D. Preston & Frans B. M. de Waal (2001). Empathy: Its Ultimate and Proximate Bases. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):1-20.score: 30.0
    There is disagreement in the literature about the exact nature of the phenomenon of empathy. There are emotional, cognitive, and conditioning views, applying in varying degrees across species. An adequate description of the ultimate and proximate mechanism can integrate these views. Proximately, the perception of an object's state activates the subject's corresponding representations, which in turn activate somatic and autonomic responses. This mechanism supports basic behaviors (e.g., alarm, social facilitation, vicariousness of emotions, mother-infant responsiveness, and the modeling of competitors and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Beth Preston (2003). Of Marigold Beer: A Reply to Vermaas and Houkes. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (4):601-612.score: 30.0
    Vermaas and Houkes advance four desiderata for theories of artifact function, and classify such theories into non-intentionalist reproduction theories on the one hand and intentionalist non-reproduction theories on the other. They argue that non-intentionalist reproduction theories fail to satisfy their fourth desideratum. They maintain that only an intentionalist non-reproduction theory can satisfy all the desiderata, and they offer a version that they believe does satisfy all of them. I reply that intentionalist non-reproduction theories, including their version, fail to satisfy their (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Andrew Bartlett & David Preston (2000). Can Ethical Behaviour Really Exist in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):199 - 209.score: 30.0
    Our soft survey reveals that the assumption underlying much of the business ethics literature -- that the conduct of business can and ought to support the social good -- is not accepted within the workplace. This paper considers an apparent dichotomy, with companies investing in ethical programs whose worth their employees and managers question. We examine the relationship between work, bureaucracy and "the market" and conclude that employees often question the existence of business ethics because there is no good and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. John Preston (2008). Hertz, Wittgenstein and Philosophical Method. Philosophical Investigations 31 (1):48–67.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John Preston (2008). Mach and Hertz's Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):91-101.score: 30.0
  27. Beth Preston (1991). Anthropocentrism, and the Evolution of 'Intelligence'. Minds and Machines 1 (3):259-277.score: 30.0
    Intuitive conceptions guide practice, but practice reciprocally reshapes intuition. The intuitive conception of intelligence in AI was originally highly anthropocentric. However, the internal dynamics of AI research have resulted in a divergence from anthropocentric concerns. In particular, the increasing emphasis on commonsense knowledge and peripheral intelligence (perception and movement) in effect constitutes an incipient reorientation of intuitions about the nature of intelligence in a non-anthropocentric direction. I argue that this conceptual shift undermines Joseph Weizenbaum's claim that the project of artificial (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Beth Preston & Victoria Davion (1997). Mind and Morals: Essays on Cognitive Science and Ethics. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (3):447-451.score: 30.0
  29. Ted Preston (2004). Environmental Values, Pluralism, and Stability. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (1 & 2):73 – 83.score: 30.0
    While an environmental ethic is not explicitly developed in A Theory of Justice, or Political Liberalism, it is possible to extrapolate some principles dealing with non-human nature, and thereby some environmental protections, with what Rawls provides. However, his inability to provide a non-anthropocentric environmental ethic might threaten the stability of a 'well-ordered' society, and this possibility gestures to the potential 'problem' of pluralism in general. Certain environmentalists will be dissatisfied with the status of their environmental values in a Rawlsian society. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Preston (2008). Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement - Edited by Andrew Brook and Kathleen Akins. Philosophical Books 49 (1):68-71.score: 30.0
  31. Christopher J. Preston (2005). Epistemology and Environmental Philosophy: The Epistemic Significance of Place. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):1-4.score: 30.0
  32. Ted Preston (2006). The Private and Public Appeal of Self-Fashioning. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 31 (1):10-19.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. H. J. Glock & John M. Preston (1995). Externalism and First-Person Authority. The Monist 78 (4):515-33.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Beth Preston, Matthew Elton, Michael Losonsky, Saul Traiger, Randall R. Dipert & Jerome A. Shaffer (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 4 (3):353-376.score: 30.0
  35. Aaron Preston (2005). Quality Instances and the Structure of the Concrete Particular. Axiomathes 15 (2):267-292.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I examine a puzzle that emerges from what J. P. Moreland has called the traditional realist view of quality instances. Briefly put, the puzzle is to figure out how quality instances fit into the overall structure of a concrete particular, given that the traditional realist view of quality instances prima facie seems incompatible with what might be called the traditional realist view of concrete particulars. After having discussed the traditional realist views involved and the puzzle that emerges (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. John M. Preston (ed.) (1998). Thought and Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    In this volume, several major twentieth-century philosophers of mind and language make further contributions to the debate.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Blo-bzaṅ-dkon-mchog, Daniel Cozort & Craig Preston (2003). Buddhist Philosophy: Losang Gönchok's Short Commentary to Jamyang Shayba's Root Text on Tenets. Snow Lion Pubns.score: 30.0
    Skims the cream of Jamyang Shayba's intellect, providing a rare opportunity to sharpen our intellect and expand our view of Buddhist thought.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. John Preston (2008). Elucidating the Tractatus: Wittgenstein's Early Philosophy of Logic and Language – by Marie McGinn. Philosophical Investigations 31 (3):268–272.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Beth Preston (1994). Husserl's Non-Representational Theory of Mind. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):209-232.score: 30.0
  40. John Preston (1997). Feyerabend's Retreat From Realism. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):431.score: 30.0
    In attempting to assess the legacy of Paul Feyerabend's philosophical work, matters are complicated by the fact that there was a change in his basic orientation towards the philosophy of science around the end of the 1960s. Here I shall indicate one aspect of Feyerabend's divided legacy. My main aims are to sketch the principal themes in his (fairly extensive but little-known) 1990s output, to situate that later output insofar as it bears on the realism/antirealism debate, and (rather precipitously, perhaps) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Beth Preston (2006). Social Context and Artefact Function. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (1):37-41.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner, Attitudes and Social Cognition.score: 30.0
    The authors found that the feeling of authorship for mental actions such as solving problems is enhanced by effort cues experienced during mental activity; misattribution of effort cues resulted in inadvertent plagiarism. Pairs of participants took turns solving anagrams as they exerted effort on an unrelated task. People inadvertently plagiarized their partners’ answers more often when they experienced high incidental effort while working on the problem and reduced effort as the solution appeared. This result was found for efforts produced when (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John Preston (2004). Bird, Kuhn, and Positivism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):327-335.score: 30.0
  44. John Preston, Paul Feyerabend. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Christopher J. Preston (2002). Book Review: Linda McDowell. Gender, Place, and Identity: Understanding Feminist Geographies. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):219-222.score: 30.0
  46. Tom Claes & David Preston (2009). Why Bother Teaching Philosophy to Managers? Philosophy of Management 8 (1):67-73.score: 30.0
    This paper questions whether managers truly need philosophy and for what end. It highlights the achievements of management before examining its deficiencies. Once some basic foundation to support a case for the teaching of philosophy to managers has been made, the paper considers two main issues:what types of managers are there; and what type of philosophy do each of these types need. Using primary experiential data and some management questionnaires analysed using pattern recognition Artificial Intelligence the paper identifies a typology (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Christopher Preston (2011). Environmental Knowledge: Courteous Yet Subversive, Grounded Yet Surprising. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (1):91-96.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. J. Preston (1998). Science as Supermarket: `Post-Modern' Themes in Paul Feyerabend's Later Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (3):425-447.score: 30.0
  49. Catherine Preston & Roger Newport (2010). Self-Denial and the Role of Intentions in the Attribution of Agency. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):986-998.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. John Preston, Gonzalo Munévar & David Lamb (eds.) (2000). 'The Worst Enemy of Science'?: Essays in Memory of Paul Feyerabend. OUP USA.score: 30.0
    This stimulating collection is devoted to the life and work of the most flamboyant of twentieth-century philosophers, Paul Feyerabend. Feyerabend's radical epistemological claims, and his stunning argument that there is no such thing as scientific method, were highly influential during his life and have only gained attention since his death in 1994. The essays that make up this volume, written by some of today's most respected philosophers of science, many of whom knew Feyerabend as students and colleagues, cover the diverse (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000