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Profile: Kathleen Akins (Simon Fraser University)
  1. Marcus R. Watson, Kathleen A. Akins, Chris Spiker, Lyle Crawford & James T. Enns (2014). Synesthesia and Learning: A Critical Review and Novel Theory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  2.  80
    Kathleen Akins (1993). A Bat Without Qualities? In Martin Davies & Glyn W. Humphreys (eds.), Consciousness: Psychological and Philosophical Essays. Blackwell 345--358.
  3. Kathleen Akins (1996). Of Sensory Systems and the "Aboutness" of Mental States. Journal of Philosophy 93 (7):337--372.
    La autora presenta una critica a la concepcion clasica de los sentidos asumida por la mayoria de autores naturalistas que pretenden explicar el contenido mental. Esta crítica se basa en datos neurobiologicos sobre los sentidos que apuntan a que estos no parecen describir caracteristicas objetivas del mundo, sino que actuan de forma ʼnarcisita', es decir, representan informacion en funcion de los intereses concretos del organismo.El articulo se encuentra también en: Bechtel, et al., Philosophy and the Neuroscience.
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  4.  19
    Marcus R. Watson, Mark R. Blair, Pavel Kozik, Kathleen A. Akins & James T. Enns (2012). Grapheme-Color Synaesthesia Benefits Rule-Based Category Learning. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1533-1540.
    Researchers have long suspected that grapheme-color synaesthesia is useful, but research on its utility has so far focused primarily on episodic memory and perceptual discrimination. Here we ask whether it can be harnessed during rule-based Category learning. Participants learned through trial and error to classify grapheme pairs that were organized into categories on the basis of their associated synaesthetic colors. The performance of synaesthetes was similar to non-synaesthetes viewing graphemes that were physically colored in the same way. Specifically, synaesthetes learned (...)
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  5. Kathleen Akins (1996). Lost the Plot? Reconstructing Dennett's Multiple Drafts Theory of Consciousness. Mind and Language 11 (1):1-43.
    : In Consciousness Explained, Daniel Dennett presents the Multiple Drafts Theory of consciousness, a very brief, largely empirical theory of brain function. From these premises, he draws a number of quite radical conclusions—for example, the conclusion that conscious events have no determinate time of occurrence. The problem, as many readers have pointed out, is that there is little discernible route from the empirical premises to the philosophical conclusions. In this article, I try to reconstruct Dennett's argument, providing both the philosophical (...)
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  6. Kathleen Akins (1993). What is It Like to Be Boring and Myopic? In B. Dahlbom (ed.), Dennett and His Critics. Blackwell
  7. Kathleen Akins & Martin Hahn (2000). Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  8.  16
    Kathleen Akins (2002). A Question of Content. In Andrew Brook & Don Ross (eds.), Daniel Dennett. Cambridge University Press 206.
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  9.  18
    Kathleen Akins, Pignocchi Alessandro, Joshua Alexander, Anna Alexandrova, Keith Allen, Sophie Allen, Colin Allen, Maria Alvarez, Santiago Amaya & Ben Ambridge (2010). Philosophical Psychology Would Like to Thank Our Reviewers for Their Generous Contributions to the Journal in 2010. Jonathan Adler Kenneth Aizawa. Philosophical Psychology 23 (6):845-848.
  10. Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.) (2005). Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume provides an up to date and comprehensive overview of the philosophy and neuroscience movement, which applies the methods of neuroscience to traditional philosophical problems and uses philosophical methods to illuminate issues in neuroscience. At the heart of the movement is the conviction that basic questions about human cognition, many of which have been studied for millennia, can be answered only by a philosophically sophisticated grasp of neuroscience's insights into the processing of information by the human brain. Essays in (...)
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  11.  10
    Kathleen A. Akins & Daniel C. Dennett (1986). Who May I Say is Calling? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):517.
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  12.  1
    Kathleen Akins (1996). Of Sensory Systems and the "Aboutness" of Mental States. Journal of Philosophy 93 (7):337.
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  13.  39
    Kathleen Akins & Philip Gerrans (2003). Introduction. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):1-11.
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  14.  11
    Kathleen A. Akins & John Lamping (1992). More Than Mere Coloring: The Art of Spectral Vision. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):26-27.
  15. Kathleen Akins & Martin Hahn (2000). The Peculiarity of Color. In Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives. New York: Oxford University Press
     
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  16.  4
    Kathleen A. Akins & Mary E. Windham (1992). Just Science? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):376-377.
  17. Kathleen Akins (1996). Ships in the Night: Churchland and Ramachandran on Dennett's Theory of Consciousness. In Perception. Oxford University Press
     
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  18.  1
    Kathleen A. Akins (1990). Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Theory of the Mind/Brain by Patricia Churchland. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):93-102.
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    Frederick Adams, Wilson Geisler, David Over, Woo-Kyoung Ahn, LouAnn Gerken, Thomas Palmeri, Kathleen Akins, Lisa Gershkoff-Stowe, David Papineau & Gerry Altmann (2002). Acknowledgment: Guest Reviewers. Cognitive Science 26:841-842.
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  20. Kathleen Akins (ed.) (1996). [Book Chapter]. Oxford University Press.
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  21.  56
    Kathleen Akins (ed.) (1996). Perception. Oxford University Press.
  22. Kathleen A. Akins (1994). The Imagery Debate. By Michael Tye. Philosophical Review 103 (1):107-137.
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  23. Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.) (2010). Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume provides an up to date and comprehensive overview of the philosophy and neuroscience movement, which applies the methods of neuroscience to traditional philosophical problems and uses philosophical methods to illuminate issues in neuroscience. At the heart of the movement is the conviction that basic questions about human cognition, many of which have been studied for millennia, can be answered only by a philosophically sophisticated grasp of neuroscience's insights into the processing of information by the human brain. Essays in (...)
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  24. Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.) (2011). Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume provides an up to date and comprehensive overview of the philosophy and neuroscience movement, which applies the methods of neuroscience to traditional philosophical problems and uses philosophical methods to illuminate issues in neuroscience. At the heart of the movement is the conviction that basic questions about human cognition, many of which have been studied for millennia, can be answered only by a philosophically sophisticated grasp of neuroscience's insights into the processing of information by the human brain. Essays in (...)
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