Search results for 'Kathleen Bloom' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kathleen Bloom (1998). The Missing Link's Missing Link: Syllabic Vocalizations at 3 Months of Age. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):514-515.score: 240.0
    If syllables are the link between nonhuman calls and human speech, as MacNeilage suggests, then that link is actually revealed in the sounds of the 3-month-old infant, well before the reduplicative babbling of the 8-month-old. Anatomical, acoustic, cognitive, and social perceptual evidence supports this earlier landmark.
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  2. Irene Bloom (1989). Response to Professor Huang Siu-Chi's Review of "Knowledge Painfully Acquired", by Lo Ch'in-Shun and Translated by Irene Bloom. Philosophy East and West 39 (4):459-463.score: 180.0
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  3. Tsui Bloom (2000). Plotkin, & Bassett (2000), Bloom SS, Tsui AO, Plotkin M., Bassett S., What Husbands in Northern India Know About Reproductive Health, Correlates of Knowledge About Pregnancy and Maternal and Sexual Health. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 32 (2).score: 180.0
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  4. Paul Bloom (2013). Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil. Crown.score: 60.0
    A leading cognitive scientist argues that a deep sense of good and evil is bred in the bone. From John Locke to Sigmund Freud, philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates. Many of us take for granted that babies are born selfish and that it is the role of society—and especially parents—to transform them from little sociopaths into civilized beings. In Just Babies, Paul Bloom argues that humans are in fact hardwired with (...)
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  5. Leslie Rebecca Bloom (1997). A Feminist Reading of Men's Health: Or, When Paglia Speaks, the Media Listens. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 18 (1):59-73.score: 60.0
    In this paper Bloom analyzes the popular magazine, Men's Health, from a feminist perspective, locating ways that the magazine participates in an insidious form of anti-feminist backlash. She specifically analyzes the magazine to make sense of how its writers discursively position women in their relationships to heterosexual men and how they use the voices of women who call themselves feminists to promote an anti-feminist, pro-patriarchy agenda. She demonstrates that the “health” of men being promoted in this magazine is a (...)
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  6. Harold Bloom (2011). The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life. Yale University Press.score: 60.0
    Bloom leads readers through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years.
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  7. Mark Alicke, David Rose & Dori Bloom (2011). Causation, Norm Violation, and Culpable Control. Journal of Philosophy 108 (12):670-696.score: 30.0
    Causation is one of philosophy's most venerable and thoroughly-analyzed concepts. However, the study of how ordinary people make causal judgments is a much more recent addition to the philosophical arsenal. One of the most prominent views of causal explanation, especially in the realm of harmful or potentially harmful behavior, is that unusual or counternormative events are accorded privileged status in ordinary causal explanations. This is a fundamental assumption in psychological theories of counterfactual reasoning, and has been transported to philosophy by (...)
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  8. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Language and Natural Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.score: 30.0
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate forms, confers (...)
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  9. Joshua Knobe, Paul Bloom & David Pizarro, College Students Implicitly Judge Interracial Sex and Gay Sex to Be Morally Wrong.score: 30.0
    College students implicitly judge interracial sex and gay sex to be morally wrong Some moral intuitions arise from psychological processes that are not fully accessible to consciousness. For instance, most people disapprove of consensual adult incest between siblings, but are unable to articulate why—they just feel that it is wrong (Haidt, 2001). More generally, there is evidence for at least two sources of moral judgment: explicit conscious reasoning and tacit intuitions, which are motivated by emotional responses (Greene et al., 2001) (...)
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  10. Paul Bloom (2001). Précis of How Children Learn the Meanings of Words. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1095-1103.score: 30.0
    Normal children learn tens of thousands of words, and do so quickly and efficiently, often in highly impoverished environments. In How Children Learn the Meanings of Words, I argue that word learning is the product of certain cognitive and linguistic abilities that include the ability to acquire concepts, an appreciation of syntactic cues to meaning, and a rich understanding of the mental states of other people. These capacities are powerful, early emerging, and to some extent uniquely human, but they are (...)
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  11. Paul Bloom (1998). Different Structures for Concepts of Individuals, Stuffs, and Real Kinds: One Mama, More Milk, and Many Mice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):66-67.score: 30.0
    Although our concepts of “Mama,” “milk,” and “mice” have much in common, the suggestion that they are identical in structure in the mind of the prelinguistic child is mistaken. Even infants think about objects as different from substances and appreciate the distinction between kinds (e.g., mice) and individuals (e.g., Mama). Such cognitive capacities exist in other animals as well, and have important adaptive consequences.
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  12. Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil (2001). Thinking Through Language. Mind and Language 16 (4):351–367.score: 30.0
    What would it be like to have never learned English, but instead only to know Hopi, Mandarin Chinese, or American Sign Language? Would that change the way you think? Imagine entirely losing your language, as the result of stroke or trauma. You are aphasic, unable to speak or listen, read or write. What would your thoughts now be like? As the most extreme case, imagine having been raised without any language at all, as a wild child. What—if anything—would it be (...)
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  13. Paul Bloom (1996). Intention, History, and Artifact Concepts. Cognition 60 (1):1-29.score: 30.0
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  14. Paul Bloom (2006). The Chomsky of Morality? [REVIEW] Nature 443 (26):909-10.score: 30.0
    In Moral Minds, Marc Hauser makes an audacious claim about moral thought. He argues that morality is best understood in much the same way as Noam Chomsky described language: as the product of an innate and universal mental faculty. For Hauser, moral intuition is not the product of culture and education, nor is it the result of rational and deliberative thought, nor doesitreduce to the workings of the emotions. Instead, it is human nature to unconsciously and automatically evaluate the moral (...)
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  15. Paul Bloom, Religion is Natural.score: 30.0
    Despite its considerable intellectual interest and great social relevance, religion has been neglected by contemporary develop- mental psychologists. But in the last few years, there has been an emerging body of research exploring children’s grasp of certain universal religious ideas. Some recent findings suggest that two foundational aspects of religious belief – belief in divine agents, and belief in mind–body dualism – come naturally to young children. This research is briefly reviewed, and some future directions..
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  16. Paul Bloom (2006). What Does Batman Think About SpongeBob? Children's Understanding of the Fantasy/Fantasy Distinction. Cognition 101 (1):9-18.score: 30.0
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  17. Paul Bloom, Causal Deviance and the Attribution of Moral Responsibility.score: 30.0
    Are current theories of moral responsibility missing a factor in the attribution of blame and praise? Four studies demonstrated that even when cause, intention, and outcome (factors generally assumed to be sufficient for the ascription of moral responsibility) are all present, blame and praise are discounted when the factors are not linked together in the usual manner (i.e., cases of ‘‘causal deviance’’). Experiment 4 further demonstrates that this effect of causal deviance is driven by intuitive gut feelings of right and (...)
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  18. Laurence Bloom (2010). Aristotle's Dialogue with Socrates (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 94-95.score: 30.0
  19. Paul Bloom (2008). Psychological Essentialism in Selecting the 14th Dalai Lama. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (7):243.score: 30.0
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  20. Yoel Inbar, David A. Pizarro, Joshua Knobe & Paul Bloom (2009). Disgust Sensitivity Predicts Intuitive Disapproval of Gays. Emotion 9 (3): 435– 43.score: 30.0
    Two studies demonstrate that a dispositional proneness to disgust (“disgust sensitivity”) is associated with intuitive disapproval of gay people. Study 1 was based on previous research showing that people are more likely to describe a behavior as intentional when they see it as morally wrong (see Knobe, 2006, for a review). As predicted, the more disgust sensitive participants were, the more likely they were to describe an agent whose behavior had the side effect of causing gay men to kiss in (...)
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  21. Paul Bloom (2006). My Brain Made Me Do It. Journal of Cognition and Culture 6 (1): 1567-7095.score: 30.0
    Shaun Nichols (this issue) correctly points out that current theories of the development of mindreading say nothing about children's intuitions concerning indeterminist choice. That is, there are numerous theories of how children make sense of belief, desire, and action, but none that appeal to any notion of free will. Nichols suggests two alternatives for why this is the case. It could either be (a) an --outrageous oversight-- on the part of developmental psychologists or (b) a principled omission, reflecting a consensus (...)
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  22. T. Bloom (2009). Just Open Borders? Examining Joseph Carens' Open Borders Argument in the Light of a Case Study of Recent Somali Migrants to the Uk. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):231 – 243.score: 30.0
    This essay examines Joseph Carens' open borders argument in the light of a case study of recent Somali migrants to the UK. It argues that, although arguments for significantly more open borders are compelling, they must take into account existing domestic injustice in receiving states as well as existing global injustice.
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  23. Roman Suszko & Stephen L. Bloom (1972). Investigations Into the Sentential Calculus with Identity. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 13 (3):289-308.score: 30.0
  24. Allan Bloom (1974). Leo Strauss: September 20, 1899-October 18, 1973. Political Theory 2 (4):372-392.score: 30.0
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  25. Paul Bloom (2002). Mindreading, Communication and the Learning of Names for Things. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):37–54.score: 30.0
    There are two facts about word learning that everyone accepts. The first is that words really do have to be learned. There is controversy over how much conceptual structure and linguistic knowledge is innate, but nobody thinks that this is the case for the specific mappings between sounds (or signs) and meanings. This is because these mappings vary arbitrarily from culture to culture. No matter how intelligent a British baby is, for instance, she still has to learn, by attending to (...)
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  26. Paul Bloom (2001). Controversies in the Study of Word Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1124-1130.score: 30.0
    How Children Learn the Meanings of Words (HCLMW) defends the theory that words are learned through sophisticated and early-emerging cognitive abilities that have evolved for other purposes; there is no dedicated mental mechanism that is special to word learning. The commentators raise a number of challenges to this theory: Does it correctly characterize the nature and development of early abilities? Does it attribute too much to children, or too little? Does it only apply to nouns, or can it also explain (...)
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  27. Allan Bloom (1977). Response to Hall. Political Theory 5 (3):315-330.score: 30.0
  28. Paul Bloom (2000). Two Reasons to Abandon the False Belief Task as a Test of Theory of Mind. Cognition 77 (1):25-31.score: 30.0
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  29. Paul Bloom, Beauty is in the Ear of the Well Informed.score: 30.0
    A few months ago, a young man in jeans and a baseball cap took a violin into a subway station in Washington DC during morning rush hour. He opened the case in front of him, put some coins inside to encourage donations and played for 45 minutes. The young man was Joshua Bell, one of the world's greatest violinists, and he was playing his multimillion-dollar Stradivarius. He was incognito, as an experiment devised by The Washington Post to see whether people (...)
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  30. Paul Bloom (2007). Developmental Changes in the Understanding of Generics. Cognition 105 (1):166-183.score: 30.0
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  31. Matt Bloom (2004). The Ethics of Compensation Systems. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (2):149-152.score: 30.0
    Compensation systems are an integral part of the relationships organizations establish with their employees. For many years, researchers viewed pay systems as an efficient way to bring market-like labour exchanges inside organizations. This view suggested that only economic considerations matter for understanding how compensation systems effect organizations and their employees. Advances in organizational research, particularly those focused on issues of justice and fairness, suggest that the fully understanding the outcomes of compensation systems requires examining their psychological, social, and moral effects.
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  32. Joseph D. Bloom (2010). “The Incarceration Revolution”1: The Abandonment of the Seriously Mentally Ill to Our Jails and Prisons. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):727-734.score: 30.0
    It is well known that today jails and prisons house many seriously mentally ill citizens who in prior decades have been treated in mental hospitals and community mental health programs. This paper begins with a brief review of the history of support for mental health programs at the federal level and then, using the State of Oregon as an example, describes the new state era of mental health services which is characterized by the increasing use of the criminal justice system (...)
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  33. Stephen L. Bloom (1973). Extensions of Gödel's Completeness Theorem and the Löwenheim-Skolem Theorem. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 14 (3):408-410.score: 30.0
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  34. Paul Bloom, Homer's Soul.score: 30.0
    What does The Simpsons have to say about this issue? Most likely, absolutely nothing. The Simpsons is a fine television show, but it’s not where to look for innovative ideas in cognitive neuroscience or the philosophy of mind. We think, however, that it can help give us insight into a related, and extremely important, issue. We might learn through this show something about common-sense metaphysics, about how people naturally think about consciousness, the brain and the soul.
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  35. Stephen L. Bloom & Roman Suszko (1971). Semantics for the Sentential Calculus with Identity. Studia Logica 28 (1):77 - 82.score: 30.0
  36. Leslie Rebecca Bloom (1992). “How Can We Know the Dancer From the Dance?”: Discourses of the Self-Body. [REVIEW] Human Studies 15 (4):313 - 334.score: 30.0
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  37. Irene Bloom (1994). Mencian Arguments on Human Nature (Jen-Hsing). Philosophy East and West 44 (1):19-53.score: 30.0
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  38. Alfred H. Bloom (1986). Psychological Ingredients of High-Level Moral Thinking: A Critique of the Kohlberg-Gilligan Paradigm. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 16 (1):89–103.score: 30.0
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  39. Stevan Harnad & Paul Bloom, In Response to This Article Rejection.score: 30.0
    Harmonic Resonance Theory: An alternative to the "Neuron Doctrine" paradigm of neurocomputation to address the Gestalt properties of perception.
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  40. Irene Bloom (1997). Human Nature and Biological Nature in Mencius. Philosophy East and West 47 (1):21-32.score: 30.0
    Ren-xing can be aptly translated as "human nature," representing as it does the Mencian conviction of and sympathy for a common humanity. The enterprise of comparative philosophy is furthered by drawing attention to the large and important conceptual sphere within which Mencius was working, to his concern for the most fundamental realities of human life, and to his translatability across time and cultures.
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  41. Paul Bloom (2000). Young Children Are Sensitive to How an Object Was Created When Deciding What to Name It. Cognition 76 (2):91-103.score: 30.0
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  42. Harold Bloom (1997). Book Review: Omens of the Millennium: The Gnosis of Angels, Dreams, and Resurrection. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (2).score: 30.0
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  43. Paul Bloom, Preschoolers Are Sensitive to the Speaker's Knowledge When Learning Proper Names.score: 30.0
    Unobservable properties that are specific to individuals, such as their proper names, can only be known by people who are familiar with those individuals. Do young children utilize this “familiarity principle” when learning language? Experiment 1 tested whether forty-eight 2- to 4-year-old children were able to determine the referent of a proper name such as “Jessie” based on the knowledge that the speaker was familiar with one individual but unfamiliar with the other. Even 2-year-olds successfully identified Jessie as the individual (...)
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  44. Stephen L. Bloom (1975). Some Theorems on Structural Consequence Operations. Studia Logica 34 (1):1 - 9.score: 30.0
    Two characterizations are given of those structural consequence operations on a propositional language which can be defined via proofs from a finite number of polynomial rules.
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  45. Paul Bloom, Word Learning, Intentions, and Discourse.score: 30.0
    I am very grateful to Aaron Cicourel, Penelope Brown, Max Louwerse, and Matthew Ventrura for their constructive comments. Aaron Cicourel provides a helpful summary of my book and his commentary offers a good place to enter the discussion for readers who have not yet read How Children Learn the Meanings of Words. Brown and Louwerse and Ventura raise some critical questions with regard to the text to which I will speak in turn.
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  46. Stephen L. Bloom (1971). A Completeness Theorem for “Theories of Kind W”. Studia Logica 27 (1):43 - 56.score: 30.0
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  47. Paul Bloom (2002). Enumeration of Collective Entities by 5-Month-Old Infants. Cognition 83 (3):55-62.score: 30.0
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  48. Stephen L. Bloom & Roman Suszko (1971). Semantyka Dla Rachunku Zdań Z Identycznością. Studia Logica 28 (1):82-82.score: 30.0
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  49. Paul Bloom (2008). Children Prefer Certain Individuals Over Perfect Duplicates. Cognition 106 (1):455-462.score: 30.0
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