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  1. Roy F. Baumeister, Kathleen D. Vohs & E. J. Masicampo (forthcoming). Maybe It Helps to Be Conscious, After All. Behavioral and Brain Sciences:20-21.
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  2. Eugene M. Caruso, Kathleen D. Vohs, Brittani Baxter & Adam Waytz (2013). Mere Exposure to Money Increases Endorsement of Free-Market Systems and Social Inequality. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):301.
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  3. Roy F. Baumeister, Alfred R. Mele & Kathleen D. Vohs (eds.) (2010). Free Will and Consciousness: How Might They Work? University Press.
    This volume is aimed at readers who wish to move beyond debates about the existence of free will and the efficacy of consciousness and closer to appreciating ...
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  4. Azim F. Shariff, Jonathan Schooler & Kathleen D. Vohs (2008). The Hazards of Claiming to Have Solved the Hard Problem of Free Will. In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oup Usa.
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  5. Kathleen D. Vohs & Roy F. Baumeister (2004). Ego-Depletion, Self-Control, and Choice. In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press. 15--398.
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  6. Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs (2003). Self-Regulation and the Executive Function of the Self. In Mark R. Leary & June Price Tangney (eds.), Handbook of Self and Identity. Guilford Press. 1--197.
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  7. Roy F. Baumeister & Kathleen D. Vohs (2002). The Collective Invention of Language to Access the Universe of Possible Ideas. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):675-676.
    Thought uses meaning but not necessarily language. Meaning, in the form of a set of possible concepts and ideas, is a nonphysical reality that lay waiting for brains to become smart enough to represent these ideas. Thus, the brain evolved, whereas meaning was discovered, and language was invented – collectively – as a tool to help the brain use meaning.
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