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  1. Kathleen Stock, Thoughts on the 'Paradox' of Fiction.
    This paper concerns the familiar topic of whether we can have genuinely emotional responses such as pity and fear to characters and situations we believe to be fictional1. As is well known, Kendall Walton responds in the negative (Walton (1978); (1990): 195-204 and Chapter 7; (1997)). That is, he is an ‘irrealist’ about emotional responses to fiction (the term is Gaut’s (2003): 15), arguing that such responses should be construed as quasiemotions (Walton (1990): 245), of which their possessor imagines that (...)
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  2. Kathleen Stock (2013). Imagining and Fiction: Some Issues. Philosophy Compass 8 (10):887-896.
    In this paper, I survey in some depth three issues arising from the connection between imagination and fiction: (i) whether fiction can be defined as such in terms of its prescribing imagining; (ii) whether imagining in response to fiction is de se, or de re, or both; (iii) the phenomenon of ‘imaginative resistance’ and various explanations for it. Along the way I survey, more briefly, several other prominent issues in this area too.
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  3. Kathleen Stock (2013). Some Reflections on Seeing-as, Metaphor-Grasping and Imagining. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):201-213.
    In this paper I examine the frequently made claim that grasping a metaphor is a kind of ‘seeing-as’. I describe several ways in which it might be thought that metaphor-grasping is importantly similar to seeing-as, such that an extension of the latter category is though justified to include the former. For some of these similarities, I suggest they are illusory; for others, I argue that they are shared in virtue of the membership of both seeing-as and metaphor-grasping in some much (...)
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  4. Kathleen Stock (2011). Cognitive Theory of Imagination and Aesthetics. In Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.), The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. 268.
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  5. Kathleen Stock (2011). Fictive Utterance and Imagining. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):145-161.
    A popular approach to defining fictive utterance says that, necessarily, it is intended to produce imagining. I shall argue that this is not falsified by the fact that some fictive utterances are intended to be believed, or are non-accidentally true. That this is so becomes apparent given a proper understanding of the relation of what one imagines to one's belief set. In light of this understanding, I shall then argue that being intended to produce imagining is sufficient for fictive utterance (...)
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  6. Kathleen Stock (2011). Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and The Mind Association 2011 University of Sussex 8–10 July 2011. Mind 120:477.
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  7. Kathleen Stock (2010). A definição da arte. Critica.
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  8. Kathleen Stock (2009). Fantasy, Imagination, and Film. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):357-369.
    In his article ‘ Fantasy, Imagination and the Screen ’ , Roger Scruton offers an account of fantasy, arguing that it is directed away from reality in some important sense, and that cinema is its natural representational medium. I address certain problems with Scruton’s basic account, thereby producing a signifi cantly amended version, though one that owes a great debt to his. I explain why, as he says, much fantasy is signifi cantly directed away from reality; and conclude with some (...)
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  9. Kathleen Stock (2008). The Role of Imagining in Seeing-In. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):365-380.
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  10. Kathleen Stock & Katherine Thomson-Jones (eds.) (2008). New Waves in Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Leading young scholars present a collection of wide-ranging essays covering central problems in meta-aesthetics and aesthetic issues in the philosophy of mind, as well as offering analyses of key aesthetic concepts, new perspectives on the history of aesthetics, and specialized treatment of individual art forms.
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  11. Kathleen Stock (ed.) (2007). Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    The issues tackled in this volume include what sort of thing a work of music is; the nature of the relation between a musical work and versions of it; the ...
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  12. Kathleen Stock (2007). Sartre, Wittgenstein, and Learning From Imagination. In Peter Goldie & Elisabeth Schellekens (eds.), Philosophy and Conceptual Art. Oxford University Press. 171--194.
  13. Kathleen Stock (2005). On Davies' Argument From Relational Properties. Acta Analytica 20 (4):24-31.
    In Art as Performance , David Davies identifies certain properties relevant to artistic appreciation of artworks that, he suggests, are naturally construed as belonging to the artist’s creative performance rather than to any product of that performance (the “work-product”). He further argues, against an anticipated opponent, that such properties cannot be excluded as irrelevant to artistic appreciation in any principled way. I argue that the cited properties can be intelligibly construed as properties of the associated work-product, whether or not they (...)
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  14. Kathleen Stock (2005). Resisting Imaginative Resistance. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):607–624.
    Recently, philosophers have identified certain fictional propositions with which one does not imaginatively engage, even where one is transparently intended by their authors to do so. One approach to explaining this categorizes it as 'resistance', that is, as deliberate failure to imagine that the relevant propositions are true; the phenomenon has become generally known (misleadingly) as 'the puzzle of imaginative resistance'. I argue that this identification is incorrect, and I dismiss several other explanations. I then propose a better one, that (...)
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  15. Kathleen Stock (2003). Historical Definitions of Art. In Stephen Davies & Ananta Charana Sukla (eds.), Art and Essence. Praeger. 159--76.
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  16. Kathleen Stock (2003). The Tower of Goldbach and Other Impossible Tales. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. 107-124.
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