Search results for 'Kathryn Plant' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Diane Collinson, Kathryn Plant & Robert Wilkinson (2000). Fifty Eastern Thinkers. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Close analysis of the work of fifty major thinkers in the field of Eastern philosophy make this an excellent introduction to a fascinating area of study. The authors have drawn together thinkers from all the major Eastern philosophical traditions from the earliest times to the present day. The philosophers covered range from founder figures such as Zoroaster and Confucius to modern thinkers such as Fung Youlan and the present Dalai Lama. Introductions to major traditions and a glossary of key philosophical (...)
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  2. Dr John S. Plant (2005). Modern Merthods and a Controversial Surname: Plant. Philosophical Explorations.score: 210.0
    In the past few years, DNA testing has begun to contribute to our understanding. It is currently emerging more clearly which surnames are multi-origin, originating with many different forefathers, and which descend from a single male ancestor. As a case study, I shall describe the application of modern, multidisciplinary methods to the surname Plant, which has been ascribed a different meaning each time an authority has written about it. The recent emergence of a different view anout this name's origins (...)
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  3. Kathryn J. Gutzwiller (forthcoming). The Plant Decoration on Theocritus' Ivy-Cup. American Journal of Philology.score: 36.0
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  4. Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson (2012). Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science. American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1-13.score: 24.0
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to (...) science, with a detailed description of the Plant Ontology (PO). We discuss the challenges of building an ontology that covers all green plants (Viridiplantae). Key results: Ontologies can advance plant science in four keys areas: 1. comparative genetics, genomics, phenomics, and development, 2. taxonomy and systematics, 3. semantic applications and 4. education. Conclusions: Bio-ontologies offer a flexible framework for comparative plant biology, based on common botanical understanding. As genomic and phenomic data become available for more species, we anticipate that the annotation of data with ontology terms will become less centralized, while at the same time, the need for cross-species queries will become more common, causing more researchers in plant science to turn to ontologies. (shrink)
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  5. Gill Kirkup (ed.) (2000). The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University.score: 24.0
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they have (...)
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  6. Christophe Bonneuil (2006). Mendelism, Plant Breeding and Experimental Cultures: Agriculture and the Development of Genetics in France. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):281 - 308.score: 24.0
    The article reevaluates the reception of Mendelism in France, and more generally considers the complex relationship between Mendelism and plant breeding in the first half on the 20th century. It shows on the one side that agricultural research and higher education institutions have played a key role in the development and institutionalization of genetics in France, whereas university biologists remained reluctant to accept this approach on heredity. But on the other side, plant breeders, and agricultural researchers, despite an (...)
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  7. Richard Doyle (2012). Healing with Plant Intelligence: A Report From Ayahuasca. Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (1):28-43.score: 24.0
    Numerous and diverse reports indicate the efficacy of shamanic plant adjuncts (e.g., iboga, ayahuasca, psilocybin) for the care and treatment of addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, cancer, cluster headaches, and depression. This article reports on a first-person healing of lifelong asthma and atopic dermatitis in the shamanic context of the contemporary Peruvian Amazon and the sometimes digital ontology of online communities. The article suggests that emerging language, concepts, and data drawn from the sciences of plant signaling and behavior regarding (...)
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  8. Edith T. Lammerts Van Bueren & Paul C. Struik (2005). Integrity and Rights of Plants: Ethical Notions in Organic Plant Breeding and Propagation. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (5):479-493.score: 24.0
    In addition to obviating the use of synthetic agrochemicals and emphasizing farming in accordance with agro-ecological guidelines, organic farming acknowledges the integrity of plants as an essential element of its natural approaches to crop production. For cultivated plants, integrity refers to their inherent nature, wholeness, completeness, species-specific characteristics, and their being in balance with their (organically farmed) environment, while accomplishing their “natural aim.” We argue that this integrity of plants has ethical value, distinguishing integrity of life, plant-typic integrity, genotypic (...)
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  9. Anna Lydia Svalastog, Petter Gustafsson & Stefan Jansson (2006). Comparative Analysis of the Risk-Handling Procedures for Gene Technology Applications in Medical and Plant Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):465-479.score: 24.0
    In this paper we analyse how the risks associated with research on transgenic plants are regulated in Sweden. The paper outlines the way in which pilot projects in the plant sciences are overseen in Sweden, and discusses the international and national background to the current regulatory system. The historical, and hitherto unexplored, reasons for the evolution of current administrative and legislative procedures in plant science are of particular interest. Specifically, we discuss similarities and differences in the regulation of (...)
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  10. Søren Løkke & Per Christensen (2008). The Introduction of the Precautionary Principle in Danish Environmental Policy: The Case of Plant Growth Retardants. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (3):229-247.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we investigate the Precautionary Principle (PP) in action. Precaution is a fairly new concept in environmental policy. It emerged back in the 1960s but did not consolidate until the 1980s, as it formed part of the major changes taking place in environmental policies at that time. The PP is examined in three contexts. Firstly, we look at the meaning of the concept and how it is disseminated through the media and public discourses to the political arenas of (...)
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  11. Petra Werner & Frederic L. Holmes (2002). Justus Liebig and the Plant Physiologists. Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):421 - 441.score: 24.0
    In his book "Organic Chemistry in its Application to Agriculture and Chemistry." Justus Liebig attacked "the plant physiologists" for their support of the humus theory and for their general ignorance of chemistry. Two leading botanists, Matthias Schleiden and Hugo von Mohl, responded by sharply criticizing Liebig for his lack of knowledge of plants and his misrepresentation of the views of plant physiologists. The origin and character of this debate can be understood in part through the temperaments of Liebig (...)
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  12. Johann Baumgärtner & Josef Hartmann (2001). The Design and Implementation of Sustainable Plant Diversity Conservation Program for Alpine Meadows and Pastures. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):67-83.score: 24.0
    The paper describes the design and implementation of a plant biodiversity conservation program that was developed under funding and time constraints for diverse ecological, social, and institutional environments. The biodiversity program for alpine meadows and pastures located in the Swiss Canton of the Grisons is used as an example. The design of the sustainable program relied on existing legislation, accounted for limited ecological knowledge and expertise, and considered biodiversity as a common-pool resource. The trend to intensified cultivation of restricted (...)
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  13. Thomas Wieland (2006). Scientific Theory and Agricultural Practice: Plant Breeding in Germany From the Late 19th to the Early 20th Century. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):309 - 343.score: 24.0
    The paper deals with the transformation of plant breeding from an agricultural practice into an applied academic science in the late 19th and early 20th centuries Germany. The aim is to contribute to the ongoing debate about the relationship between science and technology. After a brief discussion of this debate the first part of the paper examines how pioneers of plant breeding developed their breeding methods and commercially successful varieties. The focus here is on the role of scientific (...)
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  14. Sylvie Pouteau (2014). Beyond “Second Animals”: Making Sense of Plant Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):1-25.score: 24.0
    Concern for what we do to plants is pivotal for the field of environmental ethics but has scarcely been voiced. This paper examines how plant ethics first emerged from the development of plant science and yet also hit theoretical barriers in that domain. It elaborates on a case study prompted by a legal article on “the dignity of creatures” in the Swiss Constitution. Interestingly, the issue of plant dignity was interpreted as a personification or rather an “animalization (...)
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  15. Nicolas Rasmussen (1999). The Forgotten Promise of Thiamin: Merck, Caltech Biologists, and Plant Hormones in a 1930s Biotechnology Project. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):245 - 261.score: 24.0
    The physiology of plant hormones was one of the most dynamic fields in experimental biology in the 1930s, and an important part of T. H. Morgan's influential life science division at the California Institute of Technology. I describe one episode of plant physiology research at the institution in which faculty member James Bonner discovered that the B vitamin thiamin is a plant growth regulator, and then worked in close collaboration with the Merck pharmaceutical firm to develop it (...)
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  16. Stephen G. Sherwood (1997). Little Things Mean a Lot: Working with Central American Farmers to Address the Mystery of Plant Disease. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):181-189.score: 24.0
    Cornell University and Zamorano (ThePanamerican School of Agriculture) facilitatedworkshops that provided Honduran and Nicaraguanfarmers new experience with plant diseases and helpedfarmers assimilate information and identify diseasemanagement alternatives. After learning about thebiology of plant diseases, farmers were able toidentify disease problems in their field, enablingthem to use pesticides more selectively. Furthermore,participants of seven courses conceived 273 pathogen-specificmanagement alternatives, and they identifiedon average 66 percent of the common recommendations by plantpathologists for the control of general disease types.Many ideas were novel (...)
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  17. David A. Cleveland (2001). Is Plant Breeding Science Objective Truth or Social Construction? The Case of Yield Stability. Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):251-270.score: 24.0
    This article presents a holistic framework for understanding the scienceof plant breeding, as an alternative to the common objectivist andconstructivist approaches in studies of science. It applies thisapproach to understanding disagreements about how to deal with yieldstability. Two contrasting definitions of yield stability are described,and concomitant differences in the understanding and roles ofsustainability and of selection, test, and target environments areexplored. Critical questions about plant breeding theory and practiceare posed, and answers from the viewpoint of the two contrastingdefinitions (...)
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  18. Jorge Marques da Silva & Elena Casetta (forthcoming). The Evolutionary Stages of Plant Physiology and a Plea for Transdisciplinarity. Axiomathes:1-11.score: 24.0
    In this paper, the need of increasing transdisciplinarity research is advocated. After having set out some peculiarity of transdisciplinarity compared with related concepts such as multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, four evolutionary stages of scientific disciplines, based on a model recently proposed are presented. This model is then applied to the case of Plant Physiology in order to attempt an evaluation of the potential for transdisciplinary engagement of the discipline, and each of the four stages of the discipline is evaluated. In (...)
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  19. Andrew Alexandra & Adrian Walsh (1997). Exclusion, Commodification and Plant Variety Rights Legislation. Agriculture and Human Values 14 (4):313-323.score: 24.0
    Plant variety rights legislation, now enactedin most Western countries, fosters the commodificationof plant varieties. In this paper, we look at theconceptual issues involved in understanding andjustifying this commodification, with particularemphasis on Australian legislation. The paper isdivided into three sections. In the first, we lay outa taxonomy of goods, drawing on this in the secondsection to point out that the standard justificationof the allocation of exclusionary property rights byappeal to scarcity will not do for abstract goods suchas plant (...)
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  20. Renata Sõukand & Raivo Kalle (2010). Plant as Object Within Herbal Landscape: Different Kinds of Perception. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (3):299-313.score: 24.0
    This contribution takes the notion of herbal landscape (a mental field associated with plants used to cure or prevent diseases and established within specific cultural and climatic zones) as a starting point. The authors argue that the features by which a person recognises the plant in the natural growing environment is of crucial importance for the classification and the use of plants within the folk tradition. The process of perception of the plant can be divided into analytical categories (...)
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  21. Matthew K. Chew (2009). The Monstering of Tamarisk: How Scientists Made a Plant Into a Problem. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 42 (2):231 - 266.score: 22.0
    Dispersal of biota by humans is a hallmark of civilization, but the results are often unforeseen and sometimes costly. Like kudzu vine in the American South, some examples become the stuff of regional folklore. In recent decades, "invasion biology," conservation-motivated scientists and their allies have focused largely on the most negative outcomes and often promoted the perception that introduced species are monsters. However, cases of monstering by scientists preceded the rise of popular environmentalism. The story of tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), flowering (...)
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  22. Franck Varenne (2001). What Does a Computer Simulation Prove? The Case of Plant Modeling at CIRAD. In N. Giambiasi & C. Frydman (eds.), Simulation in industry - ESS 2001, Proc. of the 13th European Simulation Symposium. Society for Computer Simulation (SCS).score: 21.0
    The credibility of digital computer simulations has always been a problem. Today, through the debate on verification and validation, it has become a key issue. I will review the existing theses on that question. I will show that, due to the role of epistemological beliefs in science, no general agreement can be found on this matter. Hence, the complexity of the construction of sciences must be acknowledged. I illustrate these claims with a recent historical example. Finally I temperate this diversity (...)
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  23. Laurel Cooper, Ramona Walls, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Dennis W. Stevenson & Barry Smith (2013). The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses. Plant and Cell Physiology 54:1-23..score: 21.0
    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly-available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (“ontology”) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of (...)
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  24. Andreas Blank (2010). Julius Caesar Scaliger on Plant Generation and the Question of Species Constancy. Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):266-286.score: 21.0
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  25. Scott W. Behie & Michael J. Bidochka (2013). Potential Agricultural Benefits Through Biotechnological Manipulation of Plant Fungal Associations. Bioessays 35 (4):328-331.score: 21.0
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  26. Thejasvi Beleyur, Valiya Kadavu Abdul Kareem, Anil Shaji & Kalika Prasad (2013). A Mathematical Basis for Plant Patterning Derived From Physico-Chemical Phenomena. Bioessays 35 (4):366-376.score: 21.0
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  27. Veronica Vazquez-Garcia (2008). Gender, Ethnicity, and Economic Status in Plant Management: Uncultivated Edible Plants Among the Nahuas and Popolucas of Veracruz, Mexico. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):65-77.score: 20.0
    Uncultivated plants are an important part of agricultural systems and play a key role in the survival of rural marginalized groups such as women, children, and the poor. Drawing on the gender, environment, and development literature and on the notion of women’s social location, this paper examines the ways in which gender, ethnicity, and economic status determine women’s roles in uncultivated plant management in Ixhuapan and Ocozotepec, two indigenous communities of Veracruz, Mexico. The first is inhabited by Nahua and (...)
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  28. Ellen Clarke (2012). Plant Individuality: A Solution to the Demographer's Dilemma. Biology and Philosophy 27 (3):321-361.score: 18.0
    The problem of plant individuality is something which has vexed botanists throughout the ages, with fashion swinging back and forth from treating plants as communities of individuals (Darwin 1800 ; Braun and Stone 1853 ; Münch 1938 ) to treating them as organisms in their own right, and although the latter view has dominated mainstream thought most recently (Harper 1977 ; Cook 1985 ; Ariew and Lewontin 2004 ), a lively debate conducted mostly in Scandinavian journals proves that the (...)
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  29. Annika Beelitz & Doris M. Merkl-Davies (2012). Using Discourse to Restore Organisational Legitimacy: 'CEO-Speak' After an Incident in a German Nuclear Power Plant. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):101-120.score: 18.0
    We analyse managerial discourse in corporate communication (‘CEO-speak’) during a 6-month period following a legitimacy-threatening event in the form of an incident in a German nuclear power plant. As discourses express specific stances expressed by a group of people who share particular beliefs and values, they constitute an important means of restoring organisational legitimacy when social rules and norms have been violated. Using an analytical framework based on legitimacy as a process of reciprocal sense-making and consisting of three levels (...)
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  30. Sara T. Scharf (2009). Identification Keys, the "Natural Method," and the Development of Plant Identification Manuals. Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):73 - 117.score: 18.0
    The origins of field guides and other plant identification manuals have been poorly understood until now because little attention has been paid to 18th century botanical identification guides. Identification manuals came to have the format we continue to use today when botanical instructors in post-Revolutionary France combined identification keys (step-wise analyses focusing on distinctions between plants) with the "natural method" (clustering of similar plants, allowing for identification by gestalt) and alphabetical indexes. Botanical works featuring multiple but linked techniques to (...)
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  31. Rogene A. Buchholz & Sandra B. Rosenthal (2002). Plant Citing and Environmental Conflict: A Case Study. Philosophy and Geography 5 (2):165 – 177.score: 18.0
    This paper is based on a case study involving construction of a new petrochemical plant near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the controversy surrounding its location. The paper will explore ethical issues raised by this plant, utilizing a pragmatic perspective that differs from traditional ethical frameworks. In developing and exploring the implications of this case, the complexities of its moral dimensions will be discussed, as well as the way the insights of classical American pragmatism provide a useful orientation for (...)
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  32. Mercy Kamara (2009). The Typology of the Game That American, British, and Danish Crop and Plant Scientists Play. Minerva 47 (4):441-463.score: 18.0
    Drawing from contemporary social science studies on the shifting regime of research governance, this paper extends the literature by utilizing a metaphoric image—research is a game—observed in a field engagement with 82 American, British, and Danish crop and plant scientists. It theorizes respondents’ thinking and practices by placing the rules of the research game in dynamic and interactive tension between the scientific, social, and political-economic contingencies that generate opportunities or setbacks. Scientists who play the game exploit opportunities and surmount (...)
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  33. Gary E. Varner (1994). Rejoinder to Kathryn Paxton George. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):83-86.score: 18.0
    In Use and Abuse Revisited: Response to Pluhar and Varner, Kathryn Paxton George misunderstands the point of my essay, In Defense of the Vegan Ideal: Rhetoric and Bias in the Nutrition Literature. I did not claim that the nutrition literature unambiguously confirms that vegans are not at significantly greater risk of deficiencies than omnivores. Rather than settling any empirical controversy, my aim was to show how the literature can give the casual reader a skewed impression of what is known (...)
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  34. Jeanne Millet, André Bouchard & Claude Édelin (1998). Plant Succession and Tree Architecture: An Attempt at Reconciling Two Scales of Analysis of Vegetation Dynamics. Acta Biotheoretica 46 (1).score: 18.0
    Plant succession is a phenomenon ascribed to vegetation dynamics at the scale of the plant community. The study of plant succession implies the analysis of the species involved and their relationships. Depending on the research done, the characteristics of trees have been studied according to either static, dimensional or partial approaches. We have revised the principal theories of succession, the methods of describing structure and development of tree and relationship established between tree species' attributes and their successional (...)
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  35. Matthew Hall (2009). Plant Autonomy and Human-Plant Ethics. Environmental Ethics 31 (2):169-181.score: 18.0
    It has recently been asserted that legislative moves to consider plants as ethical subjects are philosophically foolish because plants lack autonomy. While by no means the sole basis or driving criterion for moral behavior, it is possible to directly challenge skeptical attitudes by constructing a human-plant ethics centered on fundamental notions of autonomy. Autonomous beings are agents who rule themselves, principally for their own purposes. A considerable body of evidence in the plant sciences is increasingly recognizing the capacity (...)
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  36. Joel B. Hagen (1986). Ecologists and Taxonomists: Divergent Traditions in Twentieth-Century Plant Geography. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 19 (2):197 - 214.score: 18.0
    The distinction between taxonomic plant geography and ecological plant geography was never absolute: it would be historically inaccurate to portray them as totally divergent. Taxonomists occasionally borrowed ecological concepts, and ecologists never completely repudiated taxonomy. Indeed, some botanists pursued the two types of geographic study. The American taxonomist Henry Allan Gleason (1882–1975), for one, made noteworthy contributions to both. Most of Gleason's research appeared in short articles, however. He never published a major synthetic work comparable in scope or (...)
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  37. Michael Marder (2011). Plant-Soul: The Elusive Meanings of Vegetative Life. Environmental Philosophy 8 (1):83-99.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I propose an ontological-hermeneutical approach to the question of vegetative life. I argue that, though it is a product of the metaphysical traditionthat from Aristotle to Nietzsche ascribes to the life of plants but a single function, the notion of plant-soul is useful for the formulation of a post-metaphysicalphilosophy of vegetation. Offered as a prolegomenon to such thinking about plants, this paper focuses on the multiplicity of meanings, the obscurity, and thepotentialities inherent in their life.
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  38. Rolf Sattler (1990). Towards a More Dynamic Plant Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).score: 18.0
    From the point of view of a dynamic morphology, form is not only the result of process(es) — it is process. This process may be analyzed in terms of two pairs of fundamental processes: growth and decay, differentiation and dedifferentiation. Each of these processes can be analyzed in terms of various modalities (parameters) and submodalities. This paper deals with those of growth (see Table 1). For the purpose of systematits and phylogenetic reconstruction the modalities and submodalities can be considered dynamic (...)
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  39. T. Zarcone (2005). The Myth of the Mandrake, the 'Plant-Human'. Diogenes 52 (3):115 - 129.score: 18.0
    There is no plant that embodies the encounter between humans and plants better than the mandrake, whose myth, as Arlette Bouloumié writes, ‘has the cosmic sense of a profound correlation between nature and humanity and the possibility of their merging’. Zarcone presents a collection of extracts on this theme, under three main headings: (1) ancient documents in which legend and scholarship are mixed in varying degrees; (2) contemporary scholarly studies; and (3) literary texts.
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  40. Ming Anthony & Rolf Sattler (1990). Pathological Ramification of Leaves and the Pyramid Model of Plant Construction. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).score: 18.0
    Pathological morphogenesis on leaves of Fraxinus ornus (ash) and Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) under the influence of mites (Aceria fraxinivora and Eriophyes cladophthirus respectively) leads to a range of structures whose morphology and development cannot be reduced to the classical categories of plant morphology, but present a heterogeneous continuum which links fundamental structural categories. These findings support the pyramid model of plant construction.
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  41. Beatrix W. Alsanius, Klara Löfkvist, Göran Kritz & Adrian Ratkic (2008). Reflection on Reflection in Action: A Case Study of Growers Conception of Irrigation Strategies in Pot Plant Production. [REVIEW] AI and Society 23 (4):545-558.score: 18.0
    A case study of growers conception of irrigation strategies indicates that pot plant growers in Scandinavia base their management approaches on experientially based art. The study also indicates that there is a gap between experientially based art and available greenhouse technology. In order to standardize production and produce quality, both the grower’s experience and available technology should be taken into account. In order to achieve this, the present study proposes to arrange reflection on reflection in action with a group (...)
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  42. Jean-Baptiste Litrico (2007). Beyond Paternalism: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the Functioning of a Mexican Production Plant. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):53 - 63.score: 18.0
    Expatriate managers of international businesses in emerging countries often struggle to mobilize their workforces. They sometimes perceive profound cultural differences as a barrier to the progress of their organizations. Some international businesses may adopt a paternalistic attitude toward their employees; but this questionable strategy brings mixed results. Are there ways out of paternalism for international businesses in emerging areas? This paper examines the diverging views held by foreign managers and local personnel of a foreign-owned production plant in Mexico, which (...)
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  43. I. López, M. Gámez, J. Garay, T. Standovár & Z. Varga (2010). Application of Change-Point Problem to the Detection of Plant Patches. Acta Biotheoretica 58 (1).score: 18.0
    In ecology, if the considered area or space is large, the spatial distribution of individuals of a given plant species is never homogeneous; plants form different patches. The homogeneity change in space or in time (in particular, the related change-point problem) is an important research subject in mathematical statistics. In the paper, for a given data system along a straight line, two areas are considered, where the data of each area come from different discrete distributions, with unknown parameters. In (...)
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  44. Thomas F. McMahon (1999). From Social Irresponsibility to Social Responsiveness: The Chrysler/Kenosha Plant Closing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 20 (2):101 - 111.score: 18.0
    In 1987, Chrysler bought American Motors which included a plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin, a city of 72 000. Employing 6 500 workers, most of whom were members of the United Auto Workers (UAW), Chrysler became the city's largest employer. For decades, the UAW had a strong influence on city politics. However, in the 1980s young professionals in Kenosha began challenging this status quo.Chrysler shocked the citizens of Kenosha when their executives announced the closing of their plant within a (...)
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  45. Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis (2006). Keeping Up with Dobzhansky: G. Ledyard Stebbins, Jr., Plant Evolution, and the Evolutionary Synthesis. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (1):9 - 47.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the complex relationship between the plant evolutionist G. Ledyard Stebbins and the animal evolutionist Theodosius Dobzhansky. The manner in which the plant evolution was brought into line, synthesized, or rendered consistent with the understanding of animal evolution (and especially insect evolution) is explored, especially as it culminated with the publication of Stebbins's 1950 book Variation and Evolution in Plants. The paper explores the multi-directional traffic of influence between Stebbins and Dobzhansky, but also their social and (...)
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  46. Michel Ferré & Hervé Guyader (1990). Plant Morphogenesis: A Geometrical Model for the Ramification. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).score: 18.0
    A geometrical model is proposed that describes the emergence of a primordium at the shoot apex in Dicotyledons. It is based on recent fundamental results on plant morphogenesis, viz.: – the emergence is preceded by the reorganization of the microtubules of the cortical cytoskeleton, leading to a new orientation of the synthesis of the cell wall microfibrils; – the resulting global stress is related to the general orientation of the cell growth.
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  47. J. Paul Grayson (1983). The Effects of a Plant Closure on the Stress Levels and Health of Workers' Wives — a Preliminary Analysis. Journal of Business Ethics 2 (3):221 - 225.score: 18.0
    In recent years an increasing amount of information leaves no doubt that the costs to the victims of plant closures are more than economic. The stress occasioned by job loss often results in ill health. These findings aside, little systematic research has been done of the consequences of unemployment for the spouses of the unemployed. In this article, a comparison is made between the effects of a closure on unemployed male employees and their wives. It is found that both (...)
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  48. E. Kelman, R. S. Levy & Y. Levy (2001). Optimization of Solutions for the One Plant Protection Problem. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (1).score: 18.0
    Plant protection problems are simulated by a system of ordinary differential equations with given initial conditions. The sensitivity and resistance of pathogen subpopulations to fungicide mixtures, fungicide weathering, plant growth, etc. are taken into consideration. The system of equations is solved numerically for each set of initial conditions and parameters of the disease and fungicide applications. Optimization algorithms were investigated and a computer program was developed for optimization of these solutions. 14 typical cases of the disease were simulated (...)
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  49. Robert W. Korn (1994). Hierarchical Ordering in Plant Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 42 (4).score: 18.0
    Plants are interpreted as structural hierarchies which are real systems organized through descending constraints. Types of hierarchical groups in plants are (a) cluster by integration, (b) support through attachment, (c) enclosure by encasement (d) dissipative by input of energy and (e) control through variable state switching. Most plant hierarchies are mixtures of these types which explains a number of paradoxes in plant morphology. The traditional means of identifying levels, i.e., cell, tissues, organs, uses a compositional group which is (...)
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  50. A. Ritterbusch (1990). The Measure of Biological Age in Plant Modular Systems. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (2).score: 18.0
    Phytomorphology — if concerned with development — often concentrates on correlative changes of form and neglects the aspects of age, time and clock, although the plant's spatial and temporal organisation are intimately interconnected. Common age as measured in physical time by a physical process is compared to biological age as measured by a biological clock based on a biological process. A typical example for a biological clock on the organ level is, for example, a shoot. Its biological age is (...)
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