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Profile: Katie McShane (Colorado State University)
  1. Katie McShane (2014). Individualist Biocentrism Vs. Holism Revisited. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 9 (2):130-148.
    While holist views such as ecocentrism have considerable intuitive appeal, arguing for the moral considerability of ecological wholes such as ecosystems has turned out to be a very difficult task. In the environmental ethics literature, individualist biocentrists have persuasively argued that individual organisms—but not ecological wholes—are properly regarded as having a good of their own . In this paper, I revisit those arguments and contend that they are fatally flawed. The paper proceeds in five parts. First, I consider some problems (...)
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  2. Katie McShane (2013). Editorial: Commons Made Tragic. Environmental Values 22 (3):313-315.
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  3. Katie McShane (2013). Environmental Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  4. Katie McShane (2013). Neosentimentalism and the Valence of Attitudes. Philosophical Studies 164 (3):747-765.
    Neosentimentalist accounts of value need an explanation of which of the sentiments they discuss are pro-attitudes, which attitudes are con-attitudes, and why. I argue that this project has long been neglected in the philosophical literature, even by those who make extensive use of the distinction between pro- and con-attitudes. Using the attitudes of awe and respect as exemplars, I argue that it is not at all clear what if anything makes these attitudes pro-attitudes. I conclude that neither our intuitive sense (...)
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  5. Katie McShane (2012). Some Challenges for Narrative Accounts of Value. Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):45-69.
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  6. Isis Brook, Mark Whitehead, Katie Mcshane, Clive L. Spash, Robin Attfield, Daniel Baskind, Robert Heath French, Kerry Walker, John Cottingham & Alan Holland (2011). Index to Environmental Values Volume 20, 2011. Environmental Values 20:573-576.
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  7. Katie McShane (2011). Editorial: To Act or Not to Act? Environmental Values 20 (3):297-298.
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  8. Katie McShane (2011). Neosentimentalism and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):5-23.
    Neosentimentalism provides environmental ethics with a theory of value that might be particularly useful for solving many of the problems that have plagued the field since its early days. In particular, a neosentimentalist understanding of value offers us hope for making sense of (1) what intrinsic value might be and how we could know whether parts of the natural world have it; (2) the extent to which value is an essentially anthropocentric concept; and (3) how our understanding of value could (...)
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  9. Katie Mcshane (2011). To Act or Not to Act? Environmental Values 20 (3):297 - 298.
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  10. Isis Brook, Katie Mcshane, Clive L. Spash, Nina Witoszek, Elisa Aaltola, Maniklal Adhikary, Samrat Chowdhury, Kevin Behrens, Arnold Berleant & Catherine Butler (2010). Index to Environmental Values Volume 19, 2010. Environmental Values 19:553-556.
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  11. Katie McShane (2010). Editorial. Lessons Learned. Environmental Values 19 (4):417-418.
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  12. Katie Mcshane (2010). Lessons Learned. Environmental Values 19 (4):417 - 418.
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  13. Katie Mcshane (2010). WHP Logo Environmental Values. Environmental Values 19:417-418.
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  14. Spencer Abraham, Ray Anderson, Nik Ansell, St Thomas Aquinas, St Francis of Assisi, William Baxter, Philip J. Bentley, Joachim Blatter, Murray Bookchin, Maya Brennan, Majora Carter, Carl Cohen, Deane Curtin, Herman Daly, David DeGrazia, Bill Devall, Calvin DeWitt, David Ehrenfeld, Paul, Anne Ehrlich, Robert Elliot, Stuart Ewen, Nuria Fernandez, Stephen Gardiner, Ramachandra Guha, Garrett Hardin, Eugene Hargrove, John Hasse, Po-Keung Ip, Ralf Isenmann, Kauser Jahan, Marianne B. Karsh, Andrew Kernohan, Marti Kheel, Kenneth Kraft, Aldo Leopold, Miriam MacGillis, Juan Martinez-Alier, Ed McGaa, Katie McShane, Roberto Mechoso, Arne Naess, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Michael Nelson, Bryan Norton, Philip Nyhus, John O'Neil, Stephen Pacala, Ernest Partridge, Erv Peterson, Tom Regan, Holmes Rolston Iii, Lily-Marlene Russow, Mark Sagoff, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Erroll Schweizer, George Sessions, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Stephen Socolow, Paul Steidlmeier, Richard Sylvan, Bron Taylor & Paul Taylor (2009). Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  15. Katie McShane (2009). Environmental Ethics: An Overview. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):407-420.
    This essay provides an overview of the field of environmental ethics. I sketch the major debates in the field from its inception in the 1970s to today, explaining both the central tenets of the schools of thought within the field and the arguments that have been given for and against them. I describe the main trends within the field as a whole and review some of the criticisms that have been offered of prevailing views.
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  16. Katie McShane (2008). Convergence, Noninstrumental Value and the Semantics of 'Love': Reply to Norton. Environmental Values 17 (1):15-21.
    Bryan Norton argues that my recent critique of anthropocentrism presupposes J. Baird Callicott's philosophically problematic distinction between intrinsic and instrumental value and that the problems that it raises for anthropocentrism in general are in fact only problems for strong anthropocentrism. I argue, first, that my own view does not presuppose Callicott's distinction, nor any claims about instrumental value, and second, that the problems it raises for anthropocentrism apply to weak and strong anthropocentrism alike.
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  17. Katie McShane (2008). Morality's Progress. Environmental Ethics 28 (3):323-326.
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  18. Katie Mcshane, Allen Thompson & Ronald Sandler (2008). Virtue and Respect for Nature: Ronald Sandler's Character and Environment. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (2):213 – 235.
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  19. Katie McShane (2007). Anthropocentrism Vs. Nonanthropocentrism: Why Should We Care? Environmental Values 16 (2):169-85.
    Many recent critical discussions of anthropocentrism have focused on Bryan Norton's 'convergence hypothesis': the claim that both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric ethics will recommend the same environmentally responsible behaviours and policies. I argue that even if we grant the truth of Norton's convergence hypothesis, there are still good reasons to worry about anthropocentric ethics. Ethics legitimately raises questions about how to feel, not just about which actions to take or which policies to adopt. From the point of view of norms for (...)
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  20. Katie McShane (2007). Rolston's Theory of Value. In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III. Springer.
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  21. Katie McShane (2007). Why Environmental Ethics Shouldn't Give Up on Intrinsic Value. Environmental Ethics 29 (1):43-61.
    Recent critics (Andrew Light, Bryan Norton, Anthony Weston, and Bruce Morito, among others) have argued that we should give up talk of intrinsic value in general and that of nature in particular. While earlier theorists might have overestimated the importance of intrinsic value, these recent critics underestimate its importance. Claims about a thing’s intrinsic value are claims about the distinctive way in which we have reason to care about that thing. If we understand intrinsic value in this manner, we can (...)
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  22. Katie McShane (2006). Morality's Progress: Essays on Humans, Other Animals, and the Rest of Nature. Environmental Ethics 28 (3):323-326.
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  23. Katie McShane (2004). Ecosystem Health. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):227-245.
    On most understandings of what an ecosystem is, it is a kind of thing that can be literally, not just metaphorically, healthy or unhealthy. Health is best understood as a kind of well-being; a thing’s health is a matter of retaining those structures and functions that are good for it. While it is true both that what’s good for an ecosystem depends on how we define the system and that how we define the system depends on our interests, these facts (...)
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  24. Katie McShane (2003). Review of Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (9).