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Profile: Katrien Devolder (University of Ghent)
  1. Katrien Devolder (2015). The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research. OUP Oxford.
    Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for biomedical research, but involves the destruction of human embryos. Katrien Devolder explores the tension between the view that embryos should never be deliberately harmed, and the view that such research must go forward. She provides an in-depth analysis of major attempts to resolve the problem.
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  2. Katrien Devolder (2015). U.S. Complicity and Japan's Wartime Medical Atrocities: Time for a Response. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):40-49.
    Shortly before and during the Second World War, Japanese doctors and medical researchers conducted large-scale human experiments in occupied China that were at least as gruesome as those conducted by Nazi doctors. Japan never officially acknowledged the occurrence of the experiments, never tried any of the perpetrators, and never provided compensation to the victims or issued an apology. Building on work by Jing-Bao Nie, this article argues that the U.S. government is heavily complicit in this grave injustice, and should respond (...)
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  3. Laura Capitaine, Katrien Devolder & Guido Pennings (2013). Lifespan Extension and the Doctrine of Double Effect. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):207-226.
    Recent developments in biogerontology—the study of the biology of ageing—suggest that it may eventually be possible to intervene in the human ageing process. This, in turn, offers the prospect of significantly postponing the onset of age-related diseases. The biogerontological project, however, has met with strong resistance, especially by deontologists. They consider the act of intervening in the ageing process impermissible on the grounds that it would (most probably) bring about an extended maximum lifespan—a state of affairs that they deem intrinsically (...)
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  4. Katrien Devolder (2013). A Reply to Levick's' Were It Physically Safe, Reproductive Human Cloning Would Not Be Acceptable'. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons 98--100.
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  5. Katrien Devolder (2013). Killing Discarded Embryos and the Nothing‐is‐Lost Principle. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (4):289-303.
    A widely held view holds that it is permissible to conduct destructive research on embryos discarded following fertility treatment, but not on embryos especially created for research. One argument in support of this view appeals to the nothing-is-lost principle. It holds that because discarded embryos will die soon in any case, and something good is expected to come out of using them for research, it is presumptively permissible to do so. It is then claimed that no equivalent justification can be (...)
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  6. Katrien Devolder (2013). Reply to Levick. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons 25--98.
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  7. Katrien Devolder (2013). Were It Physically Safe, Reproductive Human Cloning Would Be Acceptable. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons 79--88.
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  8. Thomas Douglas, Pieter Bonte, Farah Focquaert, Katrien Devolder & Sigrid Sterckx (2013). Coercion, Incarceration, and Chemical Castration: An Argument From Autonomy. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):393-405.
    In several jurisdictions, sex offenders may be offered chemical castration as an alternative to further incarceration. In some, agreement to chemical castration may be made a formal condition of parole or release. In others, refusal to undergo chemical castration can increase the likelihood of further incarceration though no formal link is made between the two. Offering chemical castration as an alternative to further incarceration is often said to be partially coercive, thus rendering the offender’s consent invalid. The dominant response to (...)
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  9. Thomas Douglas & Katrien Devolder (2013). Procreative Altruism: Beyond Individualism in Reproductive Selection. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):400-419.
    Existing debate on procreative selection focuses on the well-being of the future child. However, selection decisions can also have significant effects on the well-being of others. Moreover, these effects may run in opposing directions; some traits conducive to the well-being of the selected child may be harmful to others, whereas other traits that limit the child’s well-being may preserve or increase that of others. Prominent selection principles defended to date instruct parents to select a child, of the possible children they (...)
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  10. Simon Rippon, Pablo Stafforini, Katrien Devolder, Russell Powell & Thomas Douglas (2010). Resisting Sparrow's Sexy Reductio : Selection Principles and the Social Good. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):16-18.
    Principles of procreative beneficence (PPBs) hold that parents have good reasons to select the child with the best life prospects. Sparrow (2010) claims that PPBs imply that we should select only female children, unlesswe attach normative significance to “normal” human capacities. We argue that this claim fails on both empirical and logical grounds. Empirically, Sparrow’s argument for greater female wellbeing rests on a selective reading of the evidence and the incorrect assumption that an advantage for females would persist even when (...)
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  11. Katrien Devolder (2007). Review of Kerry Lynn Macintosh, Illegal Beings. Human Clones and the Law. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):97-98.
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  12. Katrien Devolder & John Harris (2007). The Ambiguity of the Embryo: Ethical Inconsistency in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):153–169.
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  13. Katrien Devolder & Christopher M. Ward (2007). Rescuing Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: The Possibility of Embryo Reconstitution After Stem Cell Derivation. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):245–263.
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  14. Katrien Devolder (2005). Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Why the Discarded-Created-Distinction Cannot Be Based on the Potentiality Argument. Bioethics 19 (2):167-186.
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  15. Katrien Devolder & John Harris (2005). Compromise and Moral Complicity in the Embryonic Stem Cell Debate. In Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.), Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  16. Katrien Devolder & Julian Savulescu (2005). The Moral Imperative to Conduct Embryonic Stem Cell and Cloning Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (01):7-21.
    On March 8, 2005, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning in which Member States are called upon toa) protect adequately human life in the application of life sciencesb) prohibit all forms of human cloning inasmuch as they are incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human lifec) prohibit the application of genetic engineering techniques that may be contrary to human dignityd) prevent the exploitation of women in the application of life sciencese) adopt and implement (...)
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