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  1. Katrin Flikschuh (2014). The Idea of Philosophical Fieldwork: Global Justice, Moral Ignorance, and Intellectual Attitudes. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (1):1-26.
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  2. Katrin Flikschuh (2013). Kant and Cosmopolitanism. The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship. By Pauline Kleingeld. (Cambridge UP, 2012, Pp. Xvi + 215. Price £55.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):804-807.
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  3. Katrin Flikschuh (2013). Kant and Cosmopolitanism. The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):804-807.
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  4. Katrin Flikschuh (2012). Elusive Unity: The General Will in Hobbes and Kant. Hobbes Studies 25 (1):21-42.
    According to one interpretation of Leviathan, Hobbes sinks the democratic argument in favour of government by representation into his own argument in favour of absolute rule. This paper argues that Kant in turn sinks Hobbes' argument for coercive political authority into Rousseau's construction of the volonté générale . Why does Kant reject Rousseau's argument in favour of popular sovereignty; why does he revert to Hobbes' endorsement of a coercively unifying political authority? The paper examines the different responses given by Hobbes, (...)
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  5. Katrin Flikschuh (2011). Innate Right and Acquired Right in Arthur Ripstein's Force and Freedom. Jurisprudence 1 (2):295-304.
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  6. Katrin Flikschuh (2011). On the Cogency of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 2 (1):17-36.
    This article queries the cogency of human rights reasoning in the context of global justice debates, focusing on Charles Beitz's practice-based approach. By 'cogency' is meant the adequacy of human rights theorising to its intended context of application. Negatively, the author argues that Beitz's characterisation of human rights reasoning as a 'global discursive practice' lacks cogency when considered in the context of the post-colonial state system; she focuses on African decolonisation. Positively, she suggests that Beitz's gloss on international human rights (...)
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  7. Katrin Flikschuh (2010). Kant's Sovereignty Dilemma: A Contemporary Analysis. Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (4):469-493.
  8. Katrin Flikschuh (2009). Kant. In David Boucher & Paul Kelly (eds.), Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oup Oxford.
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  9. Katrin Flikschuh (2009). Kant's Kingdom of Ends : Metaphysical, Not Political. In Jens Timmermann (ed.), Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
  10. Katrin Flikschuh (2008). Reason, Right, and Revolution: Kant and Locke. Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (4):375-404.
  11. Katrin Flikschuh (2008). Sidestepping Morality: Korsgaard on Kant's No-Right to Revolution. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 1:127-145.
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  12. Katrin Flikschuh (2007). Duty, Nature, Right: Kant's Response to Mendelssohn in Theory and Practice III. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):223-241.
    This paper offers an imminent interpretation of Kant's political teleology in the context of his response to Moses Mendelssohn in Theory and Practice III concerning prospects of humankind's moral progress. The paper assesses the nature of Kant's response against his mature political philosophy in the Doctrine of Right . In `Theory and Practice III' Kant's response to Mendelssohn remains incomplete: whilst insisting that individuals have a duty to contribute towards humankind's moral progress, Kant has no conclusive answer as to how (...)
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  13. Katrin Flikschuh (2007). Kant's Indemonstrable Postulate of Right: A Response to Paul Guyer. Kantian Review 12 (1):1-39.
  14. Katrin Flikschuh & Jens Timmermann (2007). Editorial Foreword. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):151-153.
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  15. Katrin Flikschuh, Jens Timmermann & Onora O'Neill (2007). Brill Online Books and Journals. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2).
     
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  16. Katrin Flikschuh (2004). The Limits of Liberal Cosmopolitanism. Res Publica 10 (2):175-192.
    The essay critically reviews two recent contributions to the debate on global justice made by Darrel Moellendorf and Thomas Pogge respectively. Given both authors’ acknowledgement of the substantial contributions which liberal economic practice currently makes to ever-increasing levels of global deprivation and injustice, can we continue to assume with confidence that liberal morality is capable of providing the solution? It is a central claim of the essay that both authors are able to sustain this optimistic assumption only because of their (...)
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  17. Katrin Flikschuh (2002). Kantian Desires: Freedom of Choice and Action in the Rechtslehre. In Mark Timmons (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: Interpretative Essays. Clarendon Press.
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  18. Katrin Flikschuh (2002). Review: Guyer, Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (03):606-.
  19. Katrin Flikschuh (2002). Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness. Dialogue 41 (3):606-610.
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  20. Katrin Flikschuh (2002). Kant on Freedom, Law, and Happiness Paul Guyer New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000, Xii + 440 Pp., $54.95, $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (3):606-611.
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  21. Katrin Flikschuh (2000). Kant and Modern Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Katrin Flikschuh examines the relevance of Kant's political thought to major issues and problems in contemporary political philosophy. She advances and defends two principal claims: that Kant's philosophy of Right endorses the role of metaphysics in political thinking, in contrast to its generally hostile reception in the field today, and that his account of political obligation is cosmopolitan in its inception, assigning priority to the global rather than the domestic context. She shows how Kant's metaphysics of freedom (...)
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  22. Katrin Flikschuh (1999). Freedom and Constraint in Kant's Metaphysical Elements of Justice. History of Political Thought 20 (2):250-271.
    Kant's political thinking is predominantly evaluated in contractarian terms, though recent contributions have also emphasized the natural law influence on him. This paper argues that the assimilation of Kant into either tradition is problematic. An analysis of his account of political obligation cannot ignore the distinctiveness of Kant's general philosophical framework. Two recurrent Kantian themes are crucial to a reconstruction of his political argument. The first is the tension between freedom and causality, or nature. The second is the role of (...)
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  23. Katrin Flikschuh (1999). Review: Gregor (Tr), Wood (Ed, Tr), & Guyer, The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant, Vol. 4, Practical Philosophy. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3:143-146.
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  24. Katrin Flikschuh (1999). Review: Flikschuha, The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3:143-146.
  25. Katrin Flikschuh (1997). On Kant's Rechtslehre. European Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):50–73.
    The paper offers a survey of recent work on Immanuel Kant's _Metaphysical Elements of Justice<D>. The author argues that a distinction should be drawn between the form and the scope of any particular conception of justice. With respect to form, the author further distinguishes between contractarian and obligation-based interpretations of Kant's work; with respect to scope a distinction is made between domestic and global approaches. The author argues that an obligation-based, global reading of Kant's account of justice is more in (...)
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  26. Katrin Flikschuh (1996). Is Kant a Liberal? Res Publica 2 (1):101-110.