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  1. Katrin Froese (2013). Humour as the Playful Sidekick to Language in the Zhuangzi. Asian Philosophy 23 (2):137-152.
    Humour in the Zhuangzi is used to question the priority that human beings bestow upon language and thought, revealing both its limitations and its possibilities. Hierarchies and conventions are overturned and both the sense and senselessness of language are celebrated. Humour also opens up a world in which a plethora of perspectives is acknowledged and the purpose of purposelessness is underscored. Encouraging us to take laughter seriously also allows us to view the seeming gravity of the human condition with increased (...)
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  2. Katrin Froese (2008). Organic Virtue: Reading Mencius with Rousseau. Asian Philosophy 18 (1):83 – 104.
    Both Rousseau and Mencius espouse a process-oriented morality that is attuned to nature. Rousseau maintains that human beings exit the realm of nature as soon as the process of civilization begins, necessitating the need for morality. Because he views the 'natural' human being as the pre-social and independent protohuman, the attempt to recapture the lost harmony of the state of nature will always fall short and the process of becoming moral is an endless task. Mencius, however, views nature as a (...)
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  3. Katrin Froese (2008). The Art of Becoming Human: Morality in Kant and Confucius. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):257-268.
    Kant and Confucius maintain that the art of becoming human is synonymous with the unending process of becoming moral. According to Kant, I must imagine a world in which the universality of my maxims were possible, while realizing that if such a world existed, then morality would disappear. Morality is an impossible possibility because it always meets resistance in our encounter with nature. According to Confucius, human beings become moral by integrating themselves into the already meaningful natural order that is (...)
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  4. Katrin Froese (2006). Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Daoist Thought: Crossing Paths in-Between. State University of New York Press.
    This work of comparative philosophy envisions a cosmological whole that celebrates difference.
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  5. Katrin Froese (2005). Woman’s Eclipse: The Silenced Feminine in Nietzsche and Heidegger. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (2):165-184.
    Nietzsche and Heidegger both challenge the metaphysical conception of the cosmos based on the principles of reason. They argue that the unspeakable, material and non-rational should be imbued with a renewed significance. In so doing, they make it possible to grant the ‘feminine’, which had been traditionally associated with these realms, philosophical importance. However, as Irigaray points out, woman is not an interlocutor in their philosophical dialogues but rather a silent foil against whom masculine self-creation takes place. Furthermore, if woman (...)
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  6. Katrin Froese (2004). From Nihilism to Nothingness: A Comparison. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4:97.
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  7. Katrin Froese (2004). From Nihilism to Nothingness: A Comparison of Nietzschean and Daoist Thought. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):97-116.
  8. Katrin Froese (2002). Rousseau and Nietzsche: Toward an Aesthetic Morality. Lexington Books.
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  9. Katrin Froese (2000). Bodies and Eternity: Nietzsche's Relation to the Feminine. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (1):25-49.
    In this article, I argue that Nietzsche collapses the rigid dichotomy between nature and culture, as well as body and mind, by insisting on their mutually constitutive nature. This forces him to reconceptualize the role of women, who had traditionally been considered to be wedded to both the natural realm and the body. Nietzsche hails women for their insight that culture can never capture nature, and for being attuned to the interplay between the two realms. He attributes an enormous power (...)
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