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  1. Kay Mathiesen & Don Fallis, Information Ethics and the Library Profession.
    We consider the mission of the librarian as an information provider and the core value that gives this mission its social importance. Our focus here is on those issues that arise in relation to the role of the librarian as an information provider. In particular, we focus on questions of the selection and organization of information, which bring up issues of bias, neutrality, advocacy, and children's rights to access information.
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  2. Kay Mathiesen (forthcoming). Game Theory in Business Ethics: Bad Ideology or Bad Press? Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  3. Kay Mathiesen (2014). Human Rights for the Digital Age. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (1):2-18.
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  4. Don Fallis & Kay Mathiesen (2013). Veritistic Epistemology and the Epistemic Goals of Groups: A Reply to Vähämaa. Social Epistemology 27 (1):21 - 25.
    (2013). Veritistic Epistemology and the Epistemic Goals of Groups: A Reply to Vähämaa. Social Epistemology: Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 21-25. doi: 10.1080/02691728.2012.760666.
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  5. Kay Mathiesen (2013). The Human Right to a Public Library. Journal of Information Ethics 22 (1):60-79.
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  6. Kay Mathiesen (2013). The Internet, Children, and Privacy: The Case Against Parental Monitoring. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 15 (4):263-274.
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  7. Kay Mathiesen (2011). Can Groups Be Epistemic Agents? In Hans Bernhard Schmid, Daniel Sirtes & Marcel Weber (eds.), Collective Epistemology. Ontos. 20--23.
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  8. Kay Mathiesen (2007). Introduction to Articles From the Third Annual Information Ethics Roundtable on Intellectual Property. Journal of Information Ethics 16 (2):16-18.
  9. Kay Mathiesen (2007). Introduction to Special Issue of Social Epistemology on "Collective Knowledge and Collective Knowers". Social Epistemology 21 (3):209 – 216.
  10. Kay Mathiesen (2006). Epistemic Risk and Community Policing. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (S1):139-150.
    In his paper “The Social Diffusion of Warrant and Rationality,” Sanford Goldberg argues that relying on testimony makes the warrant for our beliefs “socially diffuse” and that this diminishes our capacity to rationally police our beliefs. Thus, according to Goldberg, rationality itself is socially diffuse. I argue that while testimonial warrant may be socially diffuse (because it depends on the warrants of other epistemic agents) this feature has no special link to our capacity to rationally police our beliefs. Nevertheless, I (...)
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  11. Kay Mathiesen (2006). The Epistemic Features of Group Belief. Episteme 2 (3):161-175.
    Recently, there has been a debate focusing on the question of whether groups can literally have beliefs. For the purposes of epistemology, however, the key question is whether groups can have knowledge. More specifi cally, the question is whether “group views” can have the key epistemic features of belief, viz., aiming at truth and being epistemically rational. I argue that, while groups may not have beliefs in the full sense of the word, group views can have these key epistemic features (...)
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  12. Kay Mathiesen (2006). We're All in This Together: Responsibility of Collective Agents and Their Members. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):240–255.
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  13. Kay Mathiesen (2005). Collective Consciousness. In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 235.
    In this essay, I explore this idea of a collective consciousness. I propose that individuals can share in a collective consciousness by forming a collective subject. I begin the essay by considering and rejecting three possible pictures of collective subjectivity: the group mind, the emergent mind, and the socially embedded mind. I argue that each of these accounts fails to provide one of the following requirements for collective subjectivity: (1) plurality, (2) awareness, and (3) collectivity. I then look to Edmund (...)
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  14. Kay Mathiesen (2005). Epistemic Risk and Community Policing. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (Supplement):139-150.
    In his paper “The Social Diffusion of Warrant and Rationality,” Sanford Goldberg argues that relying on testimony makes the warrant for our beliefs “socially diffuse” and that this diminishes our capacity to rationally police our beliefs. Thus, according to Goldberg, rationality itself is socially diffuse. I argue that while testimonial warrant may be socially diffuse (because it depends on the warrants of other epistemic agents) this feature has no special link to our capacity to rationally police our beliefs. Nevertheless, I (...)
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  15. Kay Mathiesen (2004). What is Information Ethics? Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 34 (1):6.
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  16. Kay Mathiesen (1999). Game Theory in Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):37-45.
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  17. Kay Mathiesen, Race as an Institutional Fact.
    According to Ron Mallon (2004), any adequate account of race must meet three constraints: passing, no-traveling, and reality. "Passing" describes the fact that persons who are treated by others as belonging to one race, may "actually" belong to a different race. "No traveling" refers to the fact that racial concepts such as "white" may pick out different sets of persons in different cultures. "Reality" refers to the fact that racial designations enter into explanations of how people's lives go. However, Mallon (...)
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