Search results for 'Kay Wood' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kay Wood (2011). Education: The Basics. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Education and schooling -- What are the purposes of schooling? -- Who are the students? -- What are we teaching students in schools and universities and why? -- Teaching, learning and assessment -- Alternative views of education -- Education and the world.
     
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  2. Allen W. Wood (1998). Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature: Allen W. Wood. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):189–210.score: 210.0
    [Allen W. Wood] Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy (...)
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  3. Ellen Meiksins Wood (2012). The Ellen Meiksins Wood Reader. Brill.score: 210.0
    Ellen Meiksins Wood is a leading contemporary political theorist who has elaborated an innovative approach to the history of political thought, the social history of political theory .
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  4. Paul Wood (1998). In a Dark Wood. Environmental Ethics 20 (2):215-218.score: 180.0
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  5. D. Wood (2004). Francois Raffoul. Openness and Thought: The Liminal Interrogations of David Wood. Review of Thinking After Heidegger. Research in Phenomenology 34:269-280.score: 180.0
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  6. Allen W. Wood (2008). Kantian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In this book, Allen Wood investigates Kant's conception of ethical theory, using it to develop a viable approach to the rights and moral duties of human beings. By remaining closer to Kant's own view of the aims of ethics, Wood's understanding of Kantian ethics differs from the received "constructivist" interpretation, especially on such matters as the ground and function of ethical principles, the nature of ethical reasoning and autonomy as the ground of ethics.
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  7. Allen W. Wood (2004/1999). Karl Marx. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Since its first publication in 1981, Karl Marx has become one of the most respected books on Marx's philosophical thought. Allen Wood explains Marx's views from a philosophical standpoint and defends Marx against common misunderstandings and criticisms of his views. All the major philosophical topics in Marx's work are considered: alienation, historical materialism, morality, philosophical materialism, and the dialectical method. The second edition has been revised to include a new chapter on capitalist exploitation and new suggestions for further reading. (...)
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  8. Allen Wood, Kant and the Problem of Human Nature.score: 60.0
    Allen Wood “What is the human being?” Kant sometimes treated this question as the most fundamental question of all philosophy: “The field of philosophy in the cosmopolitan sense can be brought down to the following questions: 1. What can I know? 1. What ought I to do? 1. What may I hope? 1. What is the human being? Metaphysics answers the first question, morals the second, religion the third, and anthropology the fourth. Fundamentally, however, we could reckon all of (...)
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  9. Allen W. Wood (1999). Kant's Ethical Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This is a major new study of Kant's ethics that will transform the way students and scholars approach the subject in future. Allen Wood argues that Kant's ethical vision is grounded in the idea of the dignity of the rational nature of every human being. Undergoing both natural competitiveness and social antagonism the human species, according to Kant, develops the rational capacity to struggle against its impulses towards a human community in which the ends of all are to harmonize (...)
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  10. Allen Wood (1998). Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72:189 - 228.score: 60.0
    [Allen W. Wood] Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy (...)
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  11. Allen W. Wood (1970). Kant's Moral Religion. Ithaca,Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
  12. Allen W. Wood, Fichte: From Nature to Freedom (System of Ethics §§ 9-13:).score: 60.0
    Allen W.Wood Stanford University Fichte’s overall aim in the Second Chapter of the System of Ethics is to derive the applicability of the moral principle he has deduced in the First Chapter. That principle was: To determine one’s freedom solely in accordance with the concept of selfdetermination (SW IV:59).1 To show that this principle can be applied is to derive its application from the conditions of free agency in which we find ourselves. In the section of the Second (...)
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  13. Allen W. Wood (1990). Hegel's Ethical Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This important new study offers a powerful exposition of the ethical theory underlying Hegel's philosophy of society, politics, and history. Professor Wood shows how Hegel applies his theory to such topics as human rights, the justification of legal punishment, criteria of moral responsibility, and the authority of individual conscience. The book includes a critical discussion of Hegel's treatment of other moral philosophers (especially Kant, Fichte and Fries), provides an account of the controversial concept of "ethical life," and shows the (...)
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  14. Goran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh, Emily Carasco & Michael Callaghan (2009). Ethical Structures and Processes of Corporations Operating in Australia, Canada, and Sweden: A Longitudinal and Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):485 - 506.score: 60.0
    Based on the 'Partnership Model of Corporate Ethics' (Wood, 2002), this study examines the ethical structures and processes that are put in place by organizations to enhance the ethical business behavior of staff. The study examines the use of these structures and processes amongst the top companies in the three countries of Australia, Canada, and Sweden over two time periods (2001–2002 and 2005–2006). Subsequendy, a combined comparative and longitudinal approach is applied in the study, which we contend is a (...)
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  15. David Wood (ed.) (1990). Writing the Future. Routledge.score: 60.0
    INTRODUCTION EDITING THE FUTURE DAVID WOOD To write is to ride the tiger of time . Philosophers have too long built tiger cages. Philosophy this century has ...
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  16. Allen W. Wood (2014). The Free Development of Each: Studies on Freedom, Right, and Ethics in Classical German Philosophy. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Free Development of Each collects twelve essays on the history of German philosophy by Allen W. Wood, one of the leading scholars in the field. They explore moral philosophy, politics, society, and history in the works of Kant, Herder, Fichte, Hegel, and Marx, and share the basic theme of freedom, as it appears in morality and in politics.
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  17. Paul Kay & Brent Berlin (1997). Science [Ne] Imperialism: There Are Nontrivial Constraints on Color Naming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):196-201.score: 60.0
    Saunders & van Brakel's claim that Berlin and Kay (1969) assumed a language/vision correlation in the area of color categorization and disguised this assumption as a finding is shown to be false. The methodology of the World Color Survey, now nearing completion, is discussed and the possibility of an additional language/vision correlation in color categorization is suggested.
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  18. Cornelia Gräbner & David Wood, Introduction: Poetics of Resistance.score: 60.0
    The following text provides a conceptual and theoretical introduction to a collection of essays written by members of the multidisciplinary network of scholars, artists and cultural producers named ‘Poetics of Resistance’, which seeks to analyse and encourage discussion of the relationships between creativity, culture and political resistance, in the context of neoliberal globalization. The introduction also provides a critical glossary of a set of loosely interlinking keywords, following Raymond Williams, that mark points of encounter and departure between the approaches of (...)
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  19. Martin Wood (1999). Cyborg: A Design for Life in the Borderlands. Emergence 1 (3):92-104.score: 60.0
    Traditional managers have insisted in a highly structured way of institutionalizing the mechanistic, functianalized, physical management of people and artifacts. This focus on structure creates a tension between the need for rigid command on the OM hand and that for flexible response to threats on the other. The modern worker i s thereby confronted with a bewildering multiplicity of partial identities, contradictory viewpoints and corporate strategies that pull in different directions. Wood suggests a contrasting approach, the cyborg self; a (...)
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  20. Neil Lewis & Rega Wood (eds.) (2011). Richard Rufus of Cornwall: In Aristotelis De Generatione Et Corruptione. OUP/British Academy.score: 60.0
    Richard Rufus of Cornwall was an early Scholastic philosopher-theologian who taught at the Universities of Paris and Oxford between 1231 and 1255. In those years he played a vital part in the transformation of philosophy and theology in early thirteenth-century Western Europe. He pioneered the teaching of metaphysics, physics, chemistry, psychology, and ethics. At Paris Rufus gave the earliest lectures on Aristotelian physics and metaphysics of which a record survives. Although acknowledged as a great scholar in his lifetime, his devotion (...)
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  21. W. Jay Wood (2011). God. Mcgill-Queen’s Univ Pr.score: 60.0
    The first part of the book addresses the epistemological concerns, focusing on arguments for and against the claim that theism is rationally justifiable. These include discussion of cosmological arguments, the ontological argument, the argument from design, and the moral argument for God’s existence. Metaphysical questions about God’s nature, in particular God’s knowledge and power, and the nature of religious experience constitute the second part of the book. Epistemological and metaphysical questions are shown to be related since, if the concept of (...)
     
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  22. David W. Wood (2012). "Mathesis of the Mind": A Study of Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre and Geometry. Rodopi.score: 60.0
    This is the first major study in any language on J.G. Fichte’s philosophy of mathematics and theory of geometry. It investigates both the external formal and internal cognitive parallels between the axioms, intuitions and constructions of geometry and the scientific methodology of the Fichtean system of philosophy. In contrast to “ordinary” Euclidean geometry, in his Erlanger Logik of 1805 Fichte posits a model of an “ursprüngliche” or original geometry – that is to say, a synthetic and constructivistic conception grounded in (...)
     
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  23. Neal Wood (2002). Reflections on Political Theory: A Voice of Reason From the Past. Palgrave.score: 60.0
    In this thought-provoking study, Neal Wood challenges the conception of political theory as a lofty discipline remote from the world of real politics. Drawing on the examples of thinkers from Plato to those of the 19th Century, he attempts to define political theory by examining the nature of the state and politics, by identifying the major characteristics that their theories share and by analyzing the conditions that have favored their creation.
     
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  24. Allen W. Wood (1995). Exploitation. Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):136--158.score: 30.0
    It is commonly thought that exploitation is unjust; some think it is part of the very meaning of the word 'exploitation' that it is unjust. Those who think this will suppose that the just society has to be one in which people do not exploit one another, at least on a large scale. I will argue that exploitation is not unjust by definition, and that a society (such as Our own) might be fundamentally just while nevertheless being pervasively exploitative. I (...)
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  25. Graham Wood (2009). Detecting Design: Fast and Frugal or All Things Considered? Sophia 48 (2):195 - 210.score: 30.0
    Within the Cognitive Science of Religion, Justin Barrett has proposed that humans possess a hyperactive agency detection device that was selected for in our evolutionary past because ‘over detecting’ (as opposed to ‘under detecting’) the existence of a predator conferred a survival advantage. Within the Intelligent Design debate, William Dembski has proposed the law of small probability, which states that specified events of small probability do not occur by chance. Within the Fine-Tuning debate, John Leslie has asserted a tidiness principle (...)
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  26. Allen Wood, Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2007). Debating Allison on Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 12 (2):1-39.score: 30.0
  27. Graham Wood (2006). The Fine-Tuning Argument: The ‘Design Inference’ Version. Religious Studies 42 (4):467-471.score: 30.0
    William Dembski claims that the fine-tuning supports the inference that the universe was designed. His ‘design inference’ is based on the identification of two features of the fine-tuning. Dembski claims that it is a ‘specified’ event of small (a priori) probability. Specification, in this context, is the ability to describe an event without using any knowledge of the actual event itself. I argue that we currently do not have the ability to describe accurately the fine-tuning of the universe without using (...)
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  28. Allen W. Wood (1972). The Marxian Critique of Justice. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):244-282.score: 30.0
    When we read Karl M&IX,S descriptions of the capitalist mode of production in Capital amd other writings, all our instincts tell us that these are descriptions of an unjust social system. Marx describes a. society in which one small class of persons lives in comfort and idleness while another class, in ever-increasing numbers, lives in want and vvrctchedncss, laboring to produce thc Wealth enjoyed by the fixst. Marx speaks constantly of capitalist "exploitation" of the worker, and refers to the creation (...)
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  29. Allen Wood (2008). The Duty to Believe According to the Evidence. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 63 (1/3):7 - 24.score: 30.0
    'Evidentialism' is the conventional name (given mainly by its opponents) for the view that there is a moral duty to proportion one's beliefs to evidence, proof or other epistemic justifications for belief. This essay defends evidentialism against objections based on the alleged involuntariness of belief, on the claim that evidentialism assumes a doubtful epistemology, that epistemically unsupported beliefs can be beneficial, that there are significant classes of exceptions to the evidentialist principle, and other shabby evasions and alibis (as I take (...)
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  30. David Wood (2010). Punishment: Consequentialism. Philosophy Compass 5 (6):455-469.score: 30.0
    Punishment involves deliberating harming individuals. How, then, if at all, is it to be justified? This, the first of three papers on the philosophy of punishment (see also 'Punishment: Nonconsequentialism' and 'Punishment: The Future'), examines attempts to justify the practice or institution according to its consequences. One claim is that punishment reduces crime, and hence the resulting harms. Another is that punishment functions to rehabilitate offenders. A third claim is that punishment (or some forms of punishment) can serve to make (...)
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  31. Allen Wood, Autonomy as the Ground of Morality.score: 30.0
    Those of us who are sympathetic to Kantian ethics usually are so because we regard it as an ethics of autonomy, based on rational self-esteem and respect for the human capacity to direct one’s own life according to rational principles. Kantian ethical theory is grounded on the idea that the moral law is binding on me only because it is a law proceeding from my own will. The ground of a law of autonomy lies in the very will which is (...)
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  32. David Wood (2001). What is Ecophenomenology? Research in Phenomenology 31 (1):78-95.score: 30.0
    What is eco-phenomenology? This paper argues that eco-phenomenology, in which are folded both an ecological phenomenology and a phenomenological ecology, offers us a way of developing a middle ground between phenomenology and naturalism, between intentionality and causality. Our grasp of Nature is significantly altered by thinking through four strands of time's plexity - the invisibility of time, the celebration of finitude, the coordination of rhythms, and the interruption and breakdown of temporal horizons. It is also transformed by a meditation on (...)
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  33. Göran Svensson & Greg Wood (2008). A Model of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):303 - 322.score: 30.0
    It appears that in the 30 years that business ethics has been a discipline in its own right a model of business ethics has not been proffered. No one appears to have tried to explain the phenomenon known as ‚business ethics’ and the ways that we as a society interact with the concept, therefore, the authors have addressed this gap in the literature by proposing a model of business ethics that the authors hope will stimulate debate. The business ethics model (...)
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  34. David Wood (ed.) (1991). On Paul Ricoeur: Narrative and Interpretation. Routledge.score: 30.0
    On Paul Ricoeur examines the later work of Paul Ricoeur, particularly his major work, Time and Narrative. The essays in this volume, including three pieces by Ricoeur, consider Time and Narrative, extending and developing the debate it has inspired. Time and Narrative is the finest example of contemporary philosophical hermeneutics and is one of the most significant works of philosophy published in the late twentieth century. Paul Ricoeur's study of the intertwining of time and narrative proposes and examines the possibility (...)
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  35. Allen Wood (2003). The Good Will. Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):457-484.score: 30.0
    Kant begins the First Section of the Groundwork with a statement that is one of the most memorable in all his writings: “There is nothing it is possible to think of anywhere in the world, or indeed anything at all outside it, that can be held to be good without limitation, excepting only a good will” (Ak 4:393).[i] Due to the textual prominence of this claim, readers of the Groundwork have usually proceeded to read that work, and Kant’s other ethical (...)
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  36. Allen Wood, Kant Vs. Eudaimonism.score: 30.0
    Kant was among the first[i] to break decisively with the eudaimonistic tradition of classical ethics by declaring that the moral principle is entirely distinct and divergent from the principle of happiness (G 4:393, KpV 5:21-27).[ii] I am going to argue that what is at issue in Kant’s rejection of eudaimonism is not fundamentally any question of ethical value or the priority among values. On the contrary, on these matters Kant shares the views which led classical ethical theory from Socrates onward (...)
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  37. Allen W. Wood (1979). Marx on Right and Justice: A Reply to Husami. Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (3):267-295.score: 30.0
  38. David W. Wood (2009). Kant and the Power of Imagination by Jane Kneller. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):464-468.score: 30.0
  39. Allen Wood (2009). Review of Arthur Ripstein, Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).score: 30.0
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  40. Allen Wood (2009). Duties to Oneself, Duties of Respect to Others. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 30.0
    One of the principal aims of Kant’s Metaphysics of Morals, especially of the Doctrine of Virtue, is to present a taxonomy of our duties as human beings. The basic division of duties is between juridical duties and ethical duties, which determines the division of the Metaphysics of Morals into the Doctrine of Right and the Doctrine of Virtue. Juridical duties are duties that may be coercively enforced from outside the agent, as by the civil or criminal laws, or other social (...)
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  41. Ledger Wood (1941). The Free-Will Controversy. Philosophy 16 (October):386-397.score: 30.0
  42. Adele Santana & Donna J. Wood (2009). Transparency and Social Responsibility Issues for Wikipedia. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (2):133-144.score: 30.0
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  43. Allen W. Wood (2006). Fichte's Intersubjective I. Inquiry 49 (1):62 – 79.score: 30.0
    The challenge to philosophy of mind for the past two hundred years has been to overcome the Cartesian conception of mind. This essay explores the attempt to do this by J. G. Fichte, especially regarding intersubjectivity or the knowledge of other minds. Fichte provides a transcendental deduction of the concept of the other I, as a condition for experiencing the individuality of our own I. The basis of this argument is the concept of the "summons", which Fichte argues is necessary (...)
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  44. Richard S. Glass & Wallace A. Wood (1996). Situational Determinants of Software Piracy: An Equity Theory Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (11):1189 - 1198.score: 30.0
    Software piracy has become recognized as a major problem for the software industry and for business. One research approach that has provided a theoretical framework for studying software piracy has been to place the illegal copying of software within the domain of ethical decision making assumes that a person must be able to recognize software piracy as a moral issue. A person who fails to recognize a moral issue will fail to employ moral decision making schemata. There is substantial evidence (...)
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  45. Ellen Meiksins Wood (1978). Class Ideology and Ancient Political Theory: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle in Social Context. Blackwell.score: 30.0
  46. Rachel Wood & Susan A. J. Stuart (2009). Aplasic Phantoms and the Mirror Neuron System: An Enactive, Developmental Perspective. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):487-504.score: 30.0
    Phantom limb experiences demonstrate an unexpected degree of fragility inherent in our self-perceptions. This is perhaps most extreme when congenitally absent limbs are experienced as phantoms. Aplasic phantoms highlight fundamental questions about the physiological bases of self-experience and the ontogeny of a physical, embodied sense of the self. Some of the most intriguing of these questions concern the role of mirror neurons in supporting the development of self–other mappings and hence the emergence of phantom experiences of congenitally absent limbs. In (...)
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  47. David Wood (2006). On Being Haunted by the Future. Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):274-298.score: 30.0
    Derrida insists that we understand the 'to-come' not as a real future 'down the road', but rather as a universal structure of immanence. But such a structure is no substitute for the hard work of taking responsibility for what are often entirely predictable and preventable disasters (9/11, the Iraq war, Katrina, global warming). Otherwise "the future can only be anticipated in the form of an absolute danger". Derrida devotes much attention to proposing, imagining, hoping for a 'future' in which im-possible (...)
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  48. Allen W. Wood (2006). The Supreme Principle of Morality. In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 342--80.score: 30.0
    In the Preface to his best known work on moral philosophy, Kant states his purpose very clearly and succinctly: “The present groundwork is, however, nothing more than the search for and establishment of the supreme principle of morality, which already constitutes an enterprise whole in its aim and to be separated from every other moral investigation” (Groundwork 4:392). This paper will deal with the outcome of the first part of this task, namely, Kant’s attempt to formulate the supreme principle of (...)
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  49. Ludger Honnefelder, Rega Wood & Mechthild Dreyer (eds.) (1996). John Duns Scotus: Metaphysics and Ethics. E.J. Brill.score: 30.0
  50. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2002). Business Citizenship: From Domestic to Global Level of Analysis. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):155-188.score: 30.0
    Abstract: In this article we first review the development of the concept of global business citizenship and show how the libertarian political philosophy of free-market capitalism must give way to a communitarian view in order for the voluntaristic, local notion of “corporate citizenship” to take root. We then distinguish the concept of global business citizenship from “corporate citizenship” by showing how the former concept requires a transition from communitarian thinking to a position of universal human rights. In addition, we link (...)
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