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Keith A. Bauer [6]Keith Bauer [6]
  1. Contractarian Baselines, Alexei Marcoux & Keith Bauer (forthcoming). II Announcements and Callsfor Papers II. Business and Society Review.
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  2. Keith A. Bauer (2008). Guest Editorial. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):358-359.
    In the advent of the 21st century there can be no doubt that we have entered uncharted territory as we continue to employ diverse information and communication technologies (ICT) within healthcare. This is simply a matter of fact, at least for the Western world. But, as a question of value, what are the ethical and social ramifications of this healthcare trek? What assessments can we render on this murky, barely explored topography? A utopian answer is that ICT would deliver us (...)
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  3. Keith A. Bauer (2007). Wired Patients: Implantable Microchips and Biosensors in Patient Care. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (03):281-290.
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  4. Keith A. Bauer, Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, Paul J. Ford, Sven Ove Hansson, Matti Häyry, Sarah Hayward, Peter Herissone-Kelly & Micah Hester (2007). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16:251-253.
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  5. Keith A. Bauer, Marcus Conant, Evan G. DeRenzo, Neil Graham, Matti Häyry, Steve Heilig, Micah Hester & Søren Holm (2006). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15:117-119.
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  6. Keith Bauer (2004). Community as Healing: Pragmatist Ethics in Medical Encounters. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):62-63.
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  7. Keith Bauer (2004). Cybermedicine and the Moral Integrity of the Physician–Patient Relationship. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):83-91.
    Some critiques of cybermedicine claim that it is problematic because it fails to create physician–patient relationships. But, electronically mediated encounters do create such relationships. The issue is the nature and quality of those relationships and whether they are conducive to good patient care and meet the ethical ideals and standards of medicine. In this paper, I argue that effective communication and compassion are, in most cases, necessary for the establishment of trusting and morally appropriate physician–patient relationships. The creation of these (...)
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  8. Keith Bauer (2004). Covert Video Surveillance of Parents Suspected of Child Abuse: The British Experience and Alternative Approaches. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):311-327.
    One million cases of child maltreatment and twelve hundred child deaths due to abuse and neglect occur per year. But since many cases of abuse and neglect remain either unreported or unsubstantiated due to insufficient evidence, the number of children who are abused, neglected, and killed at the hands of family caregivers is probably higher. One approach to combat child abuse in the U.K. has been the employment of hospital-based covert video surveillance (CVS) to monitor parents suspected of Munchausen Syndrome (...)
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  9. Keith Bauer, Sara Taub & Kayhan Parsi (2004). Ethical Issues in Tissue Banking for Research: A Brief Review of Existing Organizational Policies. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (2):113-142.
    Based on a general review of international, representative tissue banking policies that were described in the medical, ethics, and legal literature, this paper reviews the range of standards, both conceptually and in existing regulations, relevant to four main factors:(1) commercialization, (2) confidentiality, (3) informed consent, and (4) quality of research. These four factors were selected as reflective of some of the major ethical considerations that arise in the conduct of tissue banking research. The authors emphasize that any policy or ethical (...)
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  10. Keith Bauer (2003). Distributive Justice and Rural Healthcare. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):241-252.
    People living in rural areas make up 20 percent of the U.S. population, but only 9 percent of physicians practice there. This uneven distribution is significant because rural areas have higher percentages of people in poverty, elderly people, people lacking health insurance coverage, and people with chronic diseases. As a way of ameliorating these disparities, e-health initiatives are being implemented. But the rural e-health movement raises its own set of distributive justice concerns about the digital divide. Moreover, even if the (...)
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  11. Keith A. Bauer (2001). Using the Internet to Empower Patients and to Develop Partnerships with Clinicians. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):1-11.
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  12. Keith A. Bauer (2001). Home-Based Telemedicine: A Survey of Ethical Issues. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):137-146.
    In the past decade, digital technology, fiber optics, cellular phones, satellite television, home computers, and the Internet have substantially transformed business, education, and leisure practices. These technologies are becoming so integrated into our daily routines that their ubiquity often goes unnoticed. We are, nonetheless, in the midst of a telecommunications revolution, and the healthcare industry is becoming a major player. The burgeoning field of home-based telemedicine is evidence of this.
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