Search results for 'Keith Lewis Topper' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Keith Lewis Topper (2005). The Disorder of Political Inquiry. Harvard University Press.
    Engaging the work of thinkers such as Richard Rorty, Charles Taylor, Pierre Bourdieu, Roy Bhaskar, and Hannah Arendt, as well as recent literature in political ...
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  2.  17
    A. Berriedale Keith (1907). Greek Cults The Cults of the Greek States. By Lewis Richard Farnell, D.Litt., M.A., F.A.S. Vols. III. And IV. Oxford: Clarendon Press, Henry Frowde. 1907. 8vo. 2 Vols. III. = Pp. Xii + 394; IV. = Pp. Viii + 454. 86 Plates. 32s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (06):171-174.
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  3.  20
    Keith Topper (2001). Not So Trifling Nuances: Pierre Bourdieu, Symbolic Violence, and the Perversions of Democracy. Constellations 8 (1):30-56.
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  4.  14
    Keith Topper (2000). In Defense of Disunity: Pragmatism, Hermeneutics, and the Social Sciences. Political Theory 28 (4):509-539.
  5.  12
    Keith Topper (1998). The Theory of International Politics? An Analysis of Neorealist Theory. Human Studies 21 (2):157-186.
    In recent years a number of writers have defended and attacked various features of structural, or neo-realist theories of international politics. Few, however, have quarrelled with one of the most foundational features of neorealist theory: its assumptions about the nature of science and scientific theories. In this essay I assess the views of science underlying much neorealist theory, especially as they are articulated in the work of Kenneth Waltz. I argue not only that neorealist theories rest on assumptions about science (...)
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  6.  7
    Keith Topper (2007). Ian Shapiro, The Flight From Reality in the Human Sciences:The Flight From Reality in the Human Sciences. Ethics 117 (3):571-576.
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  7. Owen Barfield, C. S. Lewis & G. B. Tennyson (1989). Owen Barfield on C.S. Lewis.
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  8.  26
    C. S. Lewis (1991). Letter From Lewis to Mr and Mrs Sheldon Vanauken. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):538-539.
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  9.  1
    D. W. Hamlyn, Clarence Irving Lewis, John D. Goheen & John L. Mothershead (1972). Collected Papers of Clarence Irving Lewis. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (86):68.
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  10.  24
    C. S. Lewis (1991). Lewis Explains His Reasons for Distrusting the so-Called. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):541-542.
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  11.  34
    David Lewis (1974). Spielman and Lewis on Inductive Immodesty. Philosophy of Science 41 (1):84-85.
  12.  12
    D. M. Lewis (1973). Naphtali Lewis: Greek Historical Documents: The Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xii+125. Toronto: Hakkert, 1971. Paper, $2.25. The Classical Review 23 (02):283-284.
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  13.  4
    Paul Cartledge, W. M. Calder Iii, R. S. Smith, J. Vaio & George Cornewall Lewis (2003). Teaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried MüllerTeaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried Muller. Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:262.
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  14.  1
    H. A. Lewis (1973). Modal Logic: The Lewis‐Modal Systems. Philosophical Books 14 (3):33-34.
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  15. Harry R. Lewis & Christos H. Papadimitriou (1998). Elements of the Theory of Computation Harry R. Lewis, Christos H. Papadimitriou.
     
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  16. Mark Lewis & Karen Allen (eds.) (2006). Mark Lewis. Liverpool University Press.
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  17. David K. Lewis (1991). Parts of Classes with an Appendix by John P. Burgess, A.P. Hazen, and David Lewis.
     
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  18. Hywel David Lewis, Stewart R. Sutherland & T. A. Roberts (eds.) (1989). Religion, Reason, and the Self: Essays in Honour of Hywel D. Lewis. University of Wales Press.
     
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  19. Hywel D. Lewis (1983). Solitude in Philosophy and Literature: The H. B. Acton Memorial Lecture: Hywel D. Lewis. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 16:1-13.
    ‘I understand that the world was nothing, a mechanical chaos of casual, brute enmity on which we stupidly impose our hopes and fears. I understand that, finally and absolutely, I alone exist. All the rest, I saw, is merely what pushes me, or what I push against, blindly—as blindly as all that is not myself pushes back. I create the whole universe, blink by blink. —An ugly god pitifully dying in a tree.’.
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  20.  2
    Clarence Irving Lewis & Paul Arthur Schilpp (eds.) (1968). The Philosophy of C. I. Lewis. La Salle, Ill.,Open Court.
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  21.  12
    Jason Frank (2007). The Disorder of Political Inquiry - by Keith Topper. Constellations 14 (1):147-150.
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  22.  5
    Brian Clack, A. B. P. & C. B. (1996). Dan Cohn-Sherbok. Judaism and Other Faiths. Pp. 186. £40.00.Dan Cohn-Sherbok & Christopher Lewis . Beyond Death: Theological and Philosophical Reflections on Life After Death. Pp. Xii + 219. £40.00 Hbk, £14.99 Pbk.Roy D. Morrison, II. Science, Theology and the Transcendental Horizon: Einstein, Kant and Tillich. Pp. Xxiii + 460. $59·95 Hbk, $39·95 Pbk.Dewi Z. Phillips, J. R. Jones. Pp. 122. £4·95 Pbk.Jean Porter. Moral Action and Christian Ethics. Pp. 254. £35·00.Frank E. Reynolds & David Tracy . Religion and Practical Reason: New Essays in the Comparative Philosophy of Religions. Pp. Ix + 444. $21.95.Keith E. Yandell. The Epistemology of Religious Experience. Pp. Viii + 371. £35·00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 32 (1):139.
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  23.  11
    Paul Brazier (2014). C. S. Lewis: The Question of Multiple Incarnations. Heythrop Journal 55 (3):391-408.
    Formulated by Aquinas, commented on by post-Copernican philosophers and theologians, analysed in depth by C.S. Lewis, and deliberated by some contemporary writers, the question of multiple incarnations either within humanity or amongst extra-terrestrial sentient species is all too intermittently examined: ‘Can the Christ be incarnated more than once in our reality, or somewhere else in the universe, or another reality?’ In this paper, we examine the debate and the conclusions: that is, Lewis’s position within his philosophical theology and (...)
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  24.  43
    Keith DeRose (1994). Lewis on 'Might' and 'Would' Counterfactual Conditionals. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):413 - 418.
  25.  25
    Lewis Filewood (1974). To Gilbert Keith Chesterton. The Chesterton Review 1 (1):36-37.
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  26.  7
    Keith Coleman, Lewis's Notion of a Convention.
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  27.  1
    Keith Stenning (1999). Carroll Lewis (Pseudonym), Das Spiel der Logik, Germam Translation by Micheal Zöllner of 671, Edited and with an Afterword by Good Paul. Tropen Verlag, Cologne, and Frommann-Holzboog, Stuttgart, 1998, 199 Pp. Good Paul, Logik—Ein Spiel, Therein, Pp. 103–119. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 64 (3):1368-1370.
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  28.  1
    Keith Stenning (1999). Review: Lewis Carroll, Michael Zollner, Paul Good, Das Spiel der Logik. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 64 (3):1368-1370.
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  29. Keith S. Donnellan (1961). C. I. Lewis and the Foundations of Necessary Truth. Dissertation, Cornell University
     
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  30. Keith DeRose & Ted A. Warfield (eds.) (1999). Skepticism: A Contemporary Reader. Oxford University Press.
    Recently, new life has been breathed into the ancient philosophical topic of skepticism. The subject of some of the best and most provocative work in contemporary philosophy, skepticism has been addressed not only by top epistemologists but also by several of the world's finest philosophers who are most known for their work in other areas of the discipline. Skepticism: A Contemporary Reader brings together the most important recent contributions to the discussion of skepticism. Covering major approaches to the skeptical problem, (...)
     
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  31. Jessica M. Wilson (2015). Hume's Dictum and Metaphysical Modality: Lewis's Combinatorialism. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to David Lewis. Blackwell 138-158.
    Many contemporary philosophers accept Hume's Dictum, according to which there are no metaphysically necessary connections between distinct, intrinsically typed entities. Tacit in Lewis 's work is a potential motivation for HD, according to which one should accept HD as presupposed by the best account of the range of metaphysical possibilities---namely, a combinatorial account, applied to spatiotemporal fundamentalia. Here I elucidate and assess this Ludovician motivation for HD. After refining HD and surveying its key, recurrent role in Lewis ’s (...)
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  32.  59
    Katherine Hawley (forthcoming). David Lewis on Persistence. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), A Companion to David Lewis. Wiley-Blackwell 237-49.
    This paper provides an overview on David Lewis's writings about persistence. I focus on two issues. First, what is the relationship between the doctrine of Humean Supervenience and the rejection of endurantism? Second, why did Lewis not adopt a stage theory of persistence, given that he advocated a counterpart theory of modality?
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  33.  51
    Hannah Tierney & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Keith Lehrer on the Basing Relation. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):27-36.
    In this paper, we review Keith Lehrer’s account of the basing relation, with particular attention to the two cases he offered in support of his theory, Raco (Lehrer, Theory of knowledge, 1990; Theory of knowledge, (2nd ed.), 2000) and the earlier case of the superstitious lawyer (Lehrer, The Journal of Philosophy, 68, 311–313, 1971). We show that Lehrer’s examples succeed in making his case that beliefs need not be based on the evidence, in order to be justified. These cases (...)
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  34. Adán Salinas (1999). La imagen narrativa de Dios en C. S. Lewis, una lectura de “Las crónicas de Narnia”. Boletín de Filosofía (10):261-278.
    El artículo propone una interpretación de la obra literaria "Las Crónicas de Narnia" del autor ingles C. S Lewis. Tal interpretación posibilita considerar la alegoría religiosa que esta obra literaria realiza sobre la experiencia de la divinidad a través de la figura del León.
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  35.  80
    D. Pritchard (2002). Two Forms of Epistemological Contextualism. Grazer Philosophische Studien 64 (1):19-55.
    The recent popularity of contextualist treatments of the key epistemic concepts has tended to obscure the differences that exist between the various kinds of contextualist theses on offer. The aim of this paper is to contribute towards rectifying this problem by exploring two of the main formulations of the contextualist position currently on offer in the literature—the 'semantic' contextualist thesis put forward by Keith DeRose and David Lewis, and the 'inferential' contextualist thesis advanced by Michael Williams. It is (...)
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  36.  71
    Wayne A. Davis (2004). Are Knowledge Claims Indexical? Erkenntnis 61 (2-3):257-281.
    David Lewis, Stewart Cohen, and Keith DeRose have proposed that sentences of the form S knows P are indexical, and therefore differ in truth value from one context to another.1 On their indexical contextualism, the truth value of S knows P is determined by whether S meets the epistemic standards of the speakers context. I will not be concerned with relational forms of contextualism, according to which the truth value of S knows P is determined by the standards (...)
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  37.  13
    Brian Garrett (2016). Tim, Tom, Time and Fate: Lewis on Time Travel. Analytic Philosophy 57 (3):247-252.
    In his well-known time travel story, David Lewis claims that there is a sense in which Tim can go back in time and kill his Grandfather and a (more inclusive) sense in which he cannot. Lewis describes Tim’s predicament as semi-fatalist, but holds that this does not compromise Tim’s freedom or his ability to kill Grandfather. I argue that if semi-fatalism is true of Tim, it is true of everyone, and that this is a troubling conclusion.
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  38.  46
    Benj Hellie (forthcoming). David Lewis and the Kangaroo: Graphing Philosophical Progress. In Russell Blackford & Damien Broderick (eds.), Philosophy's Future: The Problem of Philosophical Progress. Blackwell
    Data-driven historiography of philosophy looks to objective modeling tools for illumination of the propagation of influence. While the system of David Lewis, the most influential philosopher of our time, raises historiographic puzzles to stymie conventional analytic methods, it proves amenable to data-driven analysis. A striking result is that Lewis only becomes the metaphysician of current legend following the midpoint of his career: his initial project is to frame a descriptive science of mind and meaning; the transition to metaphysics (...)
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  39.  36
    Daniel Nolan (forthcoming). It's a Kind of Magic: Lewis, Magic and Properties. Synthese:1-25.
    David Lewis’s arguments against magical ersatzism are notoriously puzzling. Untangling different strands in those arguments is useful for bringing out what he thought was wrong with not just one style of theory about possible worlds, but with much of the contemporary metaphysics of abstract objects. After setting out what I take Lewis’s arguments to be and how best to resist them, I consider the application of those arguments to general theories of properties and relations. The constraints Lewis (...)
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  40.  7
    Fraser MacBride (2005). Lewis's Animadversions on the Truthmaker Principle. In Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon 117-40.
    The early David Lewis was a staunch critic of the Truthmaker Principle. To endorse the principle, he argued, is to accept that states of affairs are truthmakers for contingent predications. But states of affairs violate Hume's prohibition of necessary connections between distinct existences. So Lewis offered to replace the Truthmaker Principle with the weaker principle that ‘truth supervenes upon being’. This chapter argues that even this principle violates Hume's prohibition. Later Lewis came to ‘withdraw’ his doubts about (...)
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  41.  34
    Duncan Pritchard (2001). Contextualism, Scepticism, and the Problem of Epistemic Descent. Dialectica 55 (4):327–349.
    Perhaps the most dominant anti‐sceptical proposal in recent literature –advanced by such figures as Stewart Cohen, Keith DeRose and David Lewis –is the contextualist response to radical scepticism. Central to the contextualist thesis is the claim that, unlike other non‐contextualist anti‐sceptical theories, contextualism offers a dissolution of the sceptical paradox that respects our common sense epistemological intuitions. Taking DeRose's view as representative of the contextualist position, it is argued that instead of offering us an intuitive response to scepticism, (...)
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  42. Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press 244-260.
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the Open (...)
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  43. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
     
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  44. Robert Stalnaker (2004). Lewis on Intentionality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):199 – 212.
    David Lewis's account of intentionality is a version of what he calls 'global descriptivism'. The rough idea is that the correct interpretation of one's total theory is the one (among the admissible interpretations) that come closest to making it true. I give an exposition of this account, as I understand it, and try to bring out some of its consequences. I argue that there is a tension between Lewis's global descriptivism and his rejection of a linguistic account of (...)
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  45.  81
    A. R. J. Fisher (forthcoming). On Lewis Against Magic: A Study of Method in Metaphysics. Synthese:1-19.
    David Lewis objected to theories that posit necessary connections between distinct entities and to theories that involve a magical grasping of their primitives. In On the Plurality of Worlds, Lewis objected to nondescript ersatzism on these grounds. The literature contains several reconstructions of Lewis ’ critique of nondescript ersatzism but none of these interpretations adequately address his main argument because they fail to see that Lewis ’ critique is based on broader methodological considerations. I argue that (...)
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  46.  49
    Ryan Wasserman (2015). Lewis on Backward Causation. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):141-150.
    David Lewis famously defends a counterfactual theory of causation and a non-causal, similarity-based theory of counterfactuals. Lewis also famously defends the possibility of backward causation. I argue that this combination of views is untenable—given the possibility of backward causation, one ought to reject Lewis's theories of causation and counterfactuals.
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  47. Peter Menzies (1989). Probabilistic Causation and Causal Processes: A Critique of Lewis. Philosophy of Science 56 (4):642-663.
    This paper examines a promising probabilistic theory of singular causation developed by David Lewis. I argue that Lewis' theory must be made more sophisticated to deal with certain counterexamples involving pre-emption. These counterexamples appear to show that in the usual case singular causation requires an unbroken causal process to link cause with effect. I propose a new probabilistic account of singular causation, within the framework developed by Lewis, which captures this intuition.
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  48. Alvin Plantinga (2004). Supralapsarianism, or 'O Felix Culpa'. In Peter van Inwagen (ed.), Christian Faith and the Problem of Evil. Eerdmanns 1-25.
    The problem of evil has challenged religious minds and hearts throughout the ages. Just how can the presence of suffering, tragedy, and wrongdoing be squared with the all-powerful, all-loving God of faith? This book gathers some of the best, most meaningful recent reflections on the problem of evil, with contributions by shrewd thinkers in the areas of philosophy, theology, literature, linguistics, and sociology. In addition to bringing new insights to the old problem of evil, Christian Faith and the Problem of (...)
     
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  49. Joseph A. Baltimore (2011). Lewis' Modal Realism and Absence Causation. Metaphysica 12 (2):117-124.
    A major criticism of David Lewis’ counterfactual theory of causation is that it allows too many things to count as causes, especially since Lewis allows, in addition to events, absences to be causes as well. Peter Menzies has advanced this concern under the title “the problem of profligate causation.” In this paper, I argue that the problem of profligate causation provides resources for exposing a tension between Lewis’ acceptance of absence causation and his modal realism. The result (...)
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  50. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2002). Lewis' Strawman. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among (...)
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