Search results for 'Keith Moyer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    John V. R. Bull, Daniel Callahan, Richard P. Cunningham & Keith Moyer (1990). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (2):136 – 145.
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  2.  23
    Virginia Moyer, Steven M. Teutsch & Jeffrey R. Botkin (2009). Virginia Moyer, Steven M. Teutsch, and Jeffrey R. Botkin Reply. Hastings Center Report 39 (1):7-8.
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  3. Heather E. Keith (2001). Pornography Contextualized: A Test Case for a Feminist-Pragmatist Ethics. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (2):122-136.
  4.  12
    Nancy K. Keith, Charles E. Pettijohn & Melissa S. Burnett (2003). An Empirical Evaluation of the Effect of Peer and Managerial Ethical Behaviors and the Ethical Predispositions of Prospective Advertising Employees. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):251-265.
    An advertising firm''s ethical culture (as defined by the firm''s managerial and peer ethical behaviors) may affect the employees'' comfort levels and ethical behaviors. In this research, scenarios were used to describe advertising firms with various ethical cultures. Respondents'' perceived comfort levels in working for the firms described in the scenarios and the respondents'' behavioral intentions when faced with various advertising situations were assessed. Results of the study indicate that peer ethical behavior exerts a strong influence on the comfort or (...)
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  5. Mark Moyer (2008). Weak and Global Supervenience Are Strong. Philosophical Studies 138 (1):125 - 150.
    Kim argues that weak and global supervenience are too weak to guarantee any sort of dependency. Of the three original forms of supervenience, strong, weak, and global, each commonly wielded across all branches of philosophy, two are thus cast aside as uninteresting or useless. His arguments, however, fail to appreciate the strength of weak and global supervenience. I investigate what weak and global supervenience relations are functionally and how they relate to strong supervenience. For a large class of properties, weak (...)
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  6. Jeanna Moyer (2001). Why Kant and Ecofeminism Don't Mix. Hypatia 16 (3):79-97.
    : This paper consists of two sections. In section one, I explore Val Plumwood's description of the features of normative dualism, and briefly discuss how these features are manifest in Immanuel Kant's view of nature. In section two, I evaluate the claims of Holly L. Wilson, who argues that Kant is not a normative dualist. Against Wilson, I will argue that Kant maintains normative dualisms between humans/nature, humans/animals, humans/culture, and men/women. As such, Kant's philosophy is antithetical to the aims of (...)
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  7.  91
    Mark Moyer (2008). A Survival Guide to Fission. Philosophical Studies 141 (3):299 - 322.
    The fission of a person involves what common sense describes as a single person surviving as two distinct people. Thus, say most metaphysicians, this paradox shows us that common sense is inconsistent with the transitivity of identity. Lewis’s theory of overlapping persons, buttressed with tensed identity, gives us one way to reconcile the common sense claims. Lewis’s account, however, implausibly says that reference to a person about to undergo fission is ambiguous. A better way to reconcile the claims of common (...)
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  8.  67
    Mark Moyer (2006). Statues and Lumps: A Strange Coincidence? Synthese 148 (2):401 - 423.
    Puzzles about persistence and change through time, i.e., about identity across time, have foundered on confusion about what it is for ‘two things’ to be have ‘the same thing’ at a time. This is most directly seen in the dispute over whether material objects can occupy exactly the same place at the same time. This paper defends the possibility of such coincidence against several arguments to the contrary. Distinguishing a temporally relative from an absolute sense of ‘the same’, we see (...)
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  9.  66
    Mark Moyer (2008). Why We Shouldn't Swallow Worm Slices: A Case Study in Semantic Accommodation. Noûs 42 (1):109–138.
    A radical metaphysical theory typically comes packaged with a semantic theory that reconciles those radical claims with common sense. The metaphysical theory says what things exist and what their natures are, while the semantic theory specifies, in terms of these things, how we are to interpret everyday language. Thus may we “think with the learned, and speak with the vulgar.” This semantic accommodation of common sense, however, can end up undermining the very theory it is designed to protect. This paper (...)
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  10.  37
    William M. Keith & David E. Beard (2008). Toulmin's Rhetorical Logic: What's the Warrant for Warrants? Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (1):22-50.
  11.  71
    Mark Moyer, Defending Coincidence: An Explanation of a Sort.
    Can different material objects have the same parts at all times at which they exist? This paper defends the possibility of such coincidence against the main argument to the contrary, the ‘Indiscernibility Argument’. According to this argument, the modal supervenes on the nonmodal, since, after all, the non-modal is what grounds the modal; hence, it would be utterly mysterious if two objects sharing all parts had different essential properties. The weakness of the argument becomes apparent once we understand how the (...)
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  12.  26
    B. William Silcock, Carol B. Schwalbe & Susan Keith (2008). "Secret" Casualties: Images of Injury and Death in the Iraq War Across Media Platforms. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):36 – 50.
    This study examined more than 2,500 war images from U.S. television news, newspapers, news magazines, and online news sites during the first five weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 and found that only 10% showed injury or death. The paper analyzes which media platforms were most willing to show casualties and offers insights on when journalists should use gruesome war images or keep them secret.
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  13.  22
    Susan Keith, Carol B. Schwalbe & B. William Silcock (2006). Images in Ethics Codes in an Era of Violence and Tragedy. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):245 – 264.
    In an analysis of 47 U.S. journalism ethics codes, we found that although most consider images, only 9 address a gripping issue: how to treat images of tragedy and violence, such as those produced on the battlefields of Iraq, during the 2005 London bombings, and after Hurricane Katrina. Among codes that consider violent and tragic images, there is agreement on what images are problematic and a move toward green-light considerations of ethical responsibilities. However, the special problems of violence and truth (...)
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  14.  13
    Anthony Parel & Ronald C. Keith (eds.) (1992). Comparative Political Philosophy: Studies Under the Upas Tree. Sage.
    Like many disciplines, the study of political philosophy has, to a large extent, been the study of modern western political philosophy, particularly liberalism, utilitarianism, and socialism. As a consequence, the study of comparative political philosophy is still in its infancy. The contributors to this volume move beyond this Eurocentric bias to facilitate and exchange perspectives originating in European, Chinese, Indian, and Islamic communities. They document the responses to the perilous transition from "tradition" to "modernity" and address the commonality of human (...)
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  15.  52
    Mark Moyer, Weak and Global Supervenience: Functional Bark and Metaphysical Bite?
    Weak and global supervenience are equivalent to strong supervenience for intrinsic properties. Moreover, weak and global supervenience relations are always mere parts of a more general underlying strong supervenience relation. Most appeals to global supervenience, though, involve spatio-temporally relational properties; but here too, global and strong supervenience are equivalent. _Functionally_ we can characterize merely weak and global supervenience as follows: for A to supervene on B requires that at all worlds an individual’s A properties be a function of its B (...)
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  16.  50
    Mark Moyer (1999). Strengths and Weaknesses of Weak and Strong Supervenience. Philosophical Explorations.
    What is the relation between weak and strong supervenience? Kim claims that weak supervenience is weaker, that it fails to entail strong supervenience. But he mistakenly infers this in virtue of logical form. In fact, one line of reasoning suggests weak supervenience _does_ entail strong. Following this line, we see that weak and strong supervenience.
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  17.  13
    Frank S. Moyer (1990). The Healing Dimensions of the Hospital Ethics Committee: A Theologian's View. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 1 (6):323-331.
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  18.  14
    Susan Keith (2000). The Existential Copy Editor. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (1):43 – 57.
    Newspaper copy editors labor in anonymity and struggle for respect in their newsrooms. These conditions may make it difficult for them to realize their potential as the last line of defense against violations of ethical practice. By adopting existentialism as a guiding moral philosophy, however, copy editors can find the courage and confidence to act as final guardians of ethical journalism. This article examines how copy editors are often overlooked in the literature of journalism ethics and suggests ways in which (...)
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  19.  8
    William Keith (1995). De Rhetorica Fullerae. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (4):488-496.
    I should say at the outset that I actually like this book a lot, but I am not sure how comfortable I am with liking it. It is the sort of innovative, exciting, exasperating, infuriating, and provocative book that's good even when it's bad, because it sets everyone to talking and arguing about all kinds of things. Initially, I will give a brief gloss of the main points of the book and of its virtues. Then I would like to single (...)
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  20.  7
    Jerry W. Rudy & Julian R. Keith (1997). LTP and Memory: Déjà Vu. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):629-629.
    Shors & Matzel's conclusion that LTP is not related to learning is similar to one we reached several years ago. We discuss some methodological advances that have relevance to the issue and applaud the authors for challenging existing dogma.
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  21.  20
    Lisa H. Newton, Louis Hodges & Susan Keith (2004). Accountability in the Professions: Accountability in Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):166 – 190.
    Accountability is viewed as a civilizing element in society, with professional accountability formalized in most cases as duties dating to the Greeks and Socrates; journalists must find their own way, without formal professional or government regulation or licensing. Three scholars look at the process in a line from the formal professional discipline to suggesting problems the journalism fraternity faces without regulation to suggesting serious internal ethics conferences as 1 solution to the problem.
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  22.  4
    William Keith (1990). Cognitive Science on a Wing and a Prayer. Social Epistemology 343 (October-December):343-355.
  23.  47
    Hannah Tierney & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Keith Lehrer on the Basing Relation. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):27-36.
    In this paper, we review Keith Lehrer’s account of the basing relation, with particular attention to the two cases he offered in support of his theory, Raco (Lehrer, Theory of knowledge, 1990; Theory of knowledge, (2nd ed.), 2000) and the earlier case of the superstitious lawyer (Lehrer, The Journal of Philosophy, 68, 311–313, 1971). We show that Lehrer’s examples succeed in making his case that beliefs need not be based on the evidence, in order to be justified. These cases (...)
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  24.  26
    María G. Navarro (2012). Review of 'New Waves in Philosophy of Action' Edited by Jesús H. Aguilar, Andrei A. Buckareff and Keith Frankish. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online Reviews 16 (51).
    New Waves in Philosophy, a book collection that stands out for giving a snapshot of research in all areas of philosophy is a successful editorial project addressed by Vincent F. Hendricks and Duncan Pritchard. New Waves in Philosophy of Action is one of its last titles, edited by Jesús H. Aguilar, Andrei A. Buckareff and Keith Frankish. -/- The book is aimed at the researchers of all fields and readers in general interested in this sub-discipline of philosophy very difficult (...)
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  25.  3
    Keith Chrzan (1991). God and Gratuitous Evil: A Reply to Yandell: Keith Chrzan. Religious Studies 27 (1):99-103.
    In his recent paper ‘Gratuitous Evil and Divine Existence’. Keith Yandell declares the deductive argument from evil solved. He notes, however, that what persists is a probabilistic version of the argument from evil, one concluding from the evidence of evil that it is ‘highly improbable’ that God exists. Yandell attempts to refute this probabilistic argument from gratuitous evil; as shown below, however, he fails.
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  26. Radu J. Bogdan (1981). Keith Lehrer.
     
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  27. Johannes Brandl, Wolfgang Gombocz & Christian Piller (eds.) (1992). Metamind, Knowledge, and Coherence: Essays on the Philosophy of Keith Lehrer. Rodopi.
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  28.  71
    Jens Greve (2013). Response to R. Keith Sawyer. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (2):246-256.
    R. Keith Sawyer rightly claimed that the formulation of several cross-level regularities does not disprove the “autonomy” of sciences. Nevertheless, first, this autonomy becomes gradual because cross-level regularities narrow the scope for strong emergence and, second, these examples do not disprove the metaphysical premises of Kim’s critique. Sawyer and I concur on the thesis according to which the proof of strong emergence is in part an empirical question. However, it also depends on the concept of individualism applied whether a (...)
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  29.  29
    Jeroen van Bouwel (2004). Individualism and Holism, Reduction and Pluralism: A Comment on Keith Sawyer and Julie Zahle. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (4):527-535.
    Commenting on recent articles by Keith Sawyer and Julie Zahle, the author questions the way in which the debate between methodological individualists and holists has been presented and contends that too much weight has been given to metaphysical and ontological debates at the expense of giving attention to methodological debates and analysis of good explanatory practice. Giving more attention to successful explanatory practice in the social sciences and the different underlying epistemic interests and motivations for providing explanations or reducing (...)
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  30. Joseph Almog & Paolo Leonardi (eds.) (2011). Having In Mind: The Philosophy of Keith Donnellan. Oxford, but (C) David Kaplan.
    Keith Donnellan of UCLA is one of the founding fathers of contemporary philosophy of language, along with David Kaplan and Saul Kripke. Donnellan was and is an extremely creative thinker whose insights reached into metaphysics, action theory, the history of philosophy, and of course the philosophy of mind and language. This volume collects the best critical essays on Donnellan's forty-year body of work. The pieces by such noted philosophers as Tyler Burge, David Kaplan, and John Perry, discuss Donnellan's various (...)
     
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  31.  70
    Kent Johnson, Keith Donnellan.
    Keith Donnellan (1931 – ) began his studies at the University of Maryland, and earned his Bachelor’s degree from Cornell University. He stayed on at Cornell, earning a Master’s and a PhD in 1961. He also taught at there for several years before moving to UCLA in 1970, where he is currently Emeritus Professor of Philosophy. Donnellan’s work is mainly in the philosophy of language, with an emphasis on the connections between semantics and pragmatics. His most influential work was (...)
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  32.  57
    Richard Brian Davis (2002). Haecceities, Individuation and the Trinity: A Reply to Keith Yandell. Religious Studies 38 (2):201-213.
    In this paper I reply to Keith Yandell's recent charge that Anselmian theists cannot also be Trinitarians. Yandell's case turns on the contention that it is impossible to individuate Trinitarian members, if they exist necessarily. Since the ranks of Anselmian Trinitarians includes the likes of Alvin Plantinga, Robert Adams, and Thomas Flint, Yandell's claim is of considerable interest and import. I argue, by contrast, that Anselmians can appeal to what Plantinga calls an essence or haecceity – a property essentially (...)
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  33.  7
    Keith E. Yandell (1992). The Doctrine of Hell and Moral Philosophy: KEITH E. YANDELL. Religious Studies 28 (1):75-90.
    The doctrine of hell, stated with a little care, entails that some persons never achieve their greatest good, fail to really flourish and never reach the end for which they were created. If that doctrine is true, and it is tragic that persons never achieve their greatest good, then there are tragic states of affairs whose tragedy is never overcome.
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  34.  6
    Keith Hennessey Brown (2015). Barry Keith Grant, Ed. The Film Genre Reader IV. Film-Philosophy 19.
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  35.  52
    W. D. Hart (2009). The Metaphysics of Knowledge • by Keith Hossack. Analysis 69 (1):178-181.
    Keith Hossack's thesis is that knowledge is a conceptually primitive and metaphysically fundamental relation between a mind and a fact. He argues that in terms of the simple relation of knowledge we can analyze central notions of epistemology , of semantics , of modality and a priori knowledge , of psychology , and of linguistics . He does so in a framework that includes a fairly rich faculty psychology and that stresses causation: knowledge can be caused by belief, but (...)
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  36.  14
    Christian Piller (1991). On Keith Lehrer's Belief in Acceptance. Grazer Philosophische Studien 40:37-61.
    Keith Lehrer's notion of acceptance and its relation to the notion of belief is analyzed in a way that a person only accepts some proposition p if she decides to believe it in order to reach the epistemic aim. This view of acceptance turns out to be untenable: Under the empirical claim that we don't have the power to decide what to beheve it follows that we cannot accept anything. If reaching the truth is the epistemic aim acceptance proves (...)
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  37.  2
    Keith E. Yandell (1994). The Most Brutal and Inexcusable Error in Counting?: Trinity and Consistency: KEITH E. YANDELL. Religious Studies 30 (2):201-217.
    The Anglican Thirty Nine Articles join catholic Christendom in affirming that: There is but one living and true God…and in unity of this Godhead there be three Persons of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.
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  38.  11
    Esther Kroeker (2013). Response to Keith Lehrer: Thomas Reid on Common Sense and Morals. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (2):131-143.
    This paper is a response to Keith Lehrer's ‘Reid on Common Sense and Morals.’ I start by defending the general claim that it is appropriate to call Reid a moral realist. I continue by discussing three aspects of Reid's account of moral ideas. First, our first moral conceptions are non-propositional mental states that are essential ingredients of moral perception. Our first moral conceptions are not gross, indistinct and egocentric but are uninformed mental states that might be about others. Second, (...)
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  39.  7
    Michael P. Carroll (2007). Comment on Keith Haartman's "Religious Ecstasy and Personality Transformation in John Wesley's Methodism: Theoretical and Methodological Considerations". Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):37-49.
    Keith Haartman argues that childrearing practices distinctive of the English middle class in the 18th century produced a type of personality structure characterized by excessive splitting. Methodism proved popular because the Methodist experience providing a way of confronting and working through the conflicts generated by this sort of personality structure. Unfortunately, although Haartman's argument is plausible, there is little or no evidence to support his central contention: that the individuals who found Methodism most appealing were associated with the childhood (...)
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  40.  25
    Brian Barry (2003). Capitalists Rule. Ok? A Commentary on Keith Dowding. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 2 (3):323-341.
    In response to criticisms made by Keith Dowding (hereafter KD) of `Capitalists Rule OK', this article argues (1) that there is a genuine structural conflict of interest between consumers and producers, voters and politicians, and capitalists and governments, and (2) that only by ad hoc and arbitrary limitations on the scope of the concept of power can it be denied that consumers collectively have power over producers and capitalists (collectively) have power over government. KD accepts that voters (collectively) have (...)
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  41. Keith E. Yandell (1969). A Premature Farewell to Theism: KEITH E. YANDELL. Religious Studies 5 (2):251-255.
    In an incisive critique of Professor Hick's Evil and the God of Love , Professor Puccetti claims to ‘carry the campaign as well as the battle’—i.e. to show that, with respect to evil, theists ‘are either “explaining it away” or saying it cannot be explained at all. And in both cases they are in effect admitting they have no rational defence to offer. Which means that despite appearances they really are abandoning the battlefield.’.
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  42.  2
    A. Tudor (1983). Review Articles: Reading Cinema: The Dream That Kicks by Michael Chanan, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1980, Pp 353, 12.50 Stars by Richard Dyer, London: British Film Institute, 1979, Pp 204, 2.25 Women's Pictures by Annette Kuhn, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982, Pp Xiv + 226, E4.95 Cultures on Celluloid by Keith Reader, London: Quartet Books, 1981, Pp 216 11.50 The Celluloid Closet by Vito Russo, New York: Harper & Row, 1981, Pp Xil + 276, 15. [REVIEW] Theory, Culture and Society 1 (3):157-162.
    Reading Cinema: The Dream that Kicks by Michael Chanan, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1980, pp 353, £12.50 Stars by Richard Dyer, London: British Film Institute, 1979, pp 204, £2.25 Women's Pictures by Annette Kuhn, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982, pp xiv + 226, E4.95 Cultures on Celluloid by Keith Reader, London: Quartet Books, 1981, pp 216 £11.50 The Celluloid Closet by Vito Russo, New York: Harper & Row, 1981, pp xil + 276, £15.
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  43. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1987). Keith Graham, The Battle of Democracy. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 46:43.
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  44. Keith Bain (2010). Keith Bain on Movement. Currency House.
     
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  45. Peter Burke & Brian Harrison (eds.) (2000). Civil Histories: Essays Presented to Sir Keith Thomas. OUP Oxford.
    This volume is a tribute to one of England's greatest living historians, Sir Keith Thomas, by distinguished scholars who have been his pupils. They describe the changing meanings of civility and civil manners since the sixteenth century. They show how the terms were used with respect to different people - women, the English and the Welsh, imperialists, and businessmen - and their effects in fields as varied as sexual relations, religion, urban politics, and private life.
     
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  46. Peter Burke, Brian Harrison & Paul Slack (2000). Keith Thomas. In Peter Burke & Brian Harrison (eds.), Civil Histories: Essays Presented to Sir Keith Thomas. OUP Oxford 8--10.
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  47. Keith J. Cooper (1985). Scientific Method and the Appraisal of Religion: KEITH J. COOPER. Religious Studies 21 (3):319-329.
    In looking for criteria by which to assess religious conceptual systems, many philosophers have turned for help to scientific methodology. Perhaps this is because they felt philosophers of science were themselves looking in the right epistemological direction, and had a viable way of describing what they saw. Richard Swinburne has provided a strong, sustained treatment of the application of scientific method to religious truth claims, in The Existence of God . He there makes use of what he sees as ‘the (...)
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  48. James W. Cornman & Keith Jt Author Lehrer (1968). Philosophical Problems and Arguments an Introduction [by] James W. Cornman and Keith Lehrer. --. Macmillan.
     
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  49. Andrew Denham & Mark Garnett (2001). Keith Joseph. Routledge.
    Hailed by Margaret Thatcher as the founder of modern conservatism, Keith Joseph is commonly ranked among the most influential politicians of the late-20th century. A complex and enigmatic figure Joseph was almost unique among Mrs Thatcher's senior ministers in refusing to write his own memoirs. Challenging both the "mad monk" view held by his critics and his status of mythical hero to his admirers, the authors present a picture of Joseph as a thinker and decision-maker. the authors tell of (...)
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  50. Andrew Denham & Mark Garnett (2002). Keith Joseph. Routledge.
    Hailed by Margaret Thatcher as the founder of modern conservatism, Keith Joseph is commonly ranked among the most influential politicians of the late-20th century. A complex and enigmatic figure Joseph was almost unique among Mrs Thatcher's senior ministers in refusing to write his own memoirs. Challenging both the "mad monk" view held by his critics and his status of mythical hero to his admirers, the authors present a picture of Joseph as a thinker and decision-maker. the authors tell of (...)
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