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  1. Keith S. Taber (2008). Towards a Curricular Model of the Nature of Science. Science and Education 17 (2-3):179-218.
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  2. Keith S. Taber (2006). Constructivism's New Clothes: The Trivial, the Contingent, and a Progressive Research Programme Into the Learning of Science. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 8 (2):189-219.
    Constructivism has been a key referent for research into the learning of science for several decades. There is little doubt that the research into learners’ ideas in science stimulated by the constructivist movement has been voluminous, and a great deal is now known about the way various science topics may commonly be understood by learners of various ages. Despite this significant research effort, there have been serious criticisms of this area of work: in terms of its philosophical underpinning, the validity (...)
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  3. Keith S. Taber (2005). Learning Quanta: Barriers to Stimulating Transitions in Student Understanding of Orbital Ideas. Science Education 89 (1):94-116.
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  4. Keith S. Taber (2003). Mediating Mental Models of Metals: Acknowledging the Priority of the Learner's Prior Learning. Science Education 87 (5):732-758.
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  5. Keith S. Taber (2003). The Atom in the Chemistry Curriculum: Fundamental Concept, Teaching Model or Epistemological Obstacle? Foundations of Chemistry 5 (1):43-84.
    Research into learners' ideas aboutscience suggests that school and collegestudents often hold alternative conceptionsabout `the atom'. This paper discusses whylearners acquire ideas about atoms which areincompatible with the modern scientificunderstanding. It is suggested that learners'alternative ideas derive – at least in part –from the way ideas about atoms are presented inthe school and college curriculum. Inparticular, it is argued that the atomicconcept met in science education is anincoherent hybrid of historical models, andthat this explains why learners commonlyattribute to atoms properties (...)
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  6. Keith S. Taber (2001). The Mismatch Between Assumed Prior Knowledge and the Learner's Conceptions: A Typology of Learning Impediments. Educational Studies 27 (2):159-171.
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