8 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Keith W. Miller [7]Keith W. . Miller [1]
  1. Frances S. Grodzinsky, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf (forthcoming). Developing Automated Deceptions and the Impact on Trust. Philosophy and Technology:1-15.
    As software developers design artificial agents (AAs), they often have to wrestle with complex issues, issues that have philosophical and ethical importance. This paper addresses two key questions at the intersection of philosophy and technology: What is deception? And when is it permissible for the developer of a computer artifact to be deceptive in the artifact’s development? While exploring these questions from the perspective of a software developer, we examine the relationship of deception and trust. Are developers using deception to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David Larson & Keith W. Miller (2009). Ethics in the IT Classroom. Journal of Information Ethics 18 (2):38-49.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Marty J. Wolf, Keith W. Miller & Frances S. Grodzinsky (2009). Free, Source-Code-Available, or Proprietary: An Ethically Charged, Context-Sensitive Choice. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 39 (1):15-26.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Frances S. Grodzinsky, Keith W. Miller & Marty J. Wolf (2008). The Ethics of Designing Artificial Agents. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):115-121.
    In their important paper “Autonomous Agents”, Floridi and Sanders use “levels of abstraction” to argue that computers are or may soon be moral agents. In this paper we use the same levels of abstraction to illuminate differences between human moral agents and computers. In their paper, Floridi and Sanders contributed definitions of autonomy, moral accountability and responsibility, but they have not explored deeply some essential questions that need to be answered by computer scientists who design artificial agents. One such question (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Deborah G. Johnson & Keith W. Miller (2008). Un-Making Artificial Moral Agents. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):123-133.
    Floridi and Sanders, seminal work, “On the morality of artificial agents” has catalyzed attention around the moral status of computer systems that perform tasks for humans, effectively acting as “artificial agents.” Floridi and Sanders argue that the class of entities considered moral agents can be expanded to include computers if we adopt the appropriate level of abstraction. In this paper we argue that the move to distinguish levels of abstraction is far from decisive on this issue. We also argue that (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Keith W. Miller (2008). Critiquing a Critique. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):245-249.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Keith W. Miller & Bethany J. Spielman (2008). Review of Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Keith W. Miller (2005). Web Standards: Why so Many Stray From the Narrow Path. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):477-479.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation