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Profile: Kelly McCormick (Texas Christian University)
  1.  21
    Lera Boroditsky, Orly Fuhrman & Kelly McCormick (2011). Do English and Mandarin Speakers Think About Time Differently? Cognition 118 (1):123-129.
    Time is a fundamental domain of experience. In this paper we ask whether aspects of language and culture affect how people think about this domain. Specifically, we consider whether English and Mandarin speakers think about time differently. We review all of the available evidence both for and against this hypothesis, and report new data that further support and refine it. The results demonstrate that English and Mandarin speakers do think about time differently. As predicted by patterns in language, Mandarin speakers (...)
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  2.  46
    Orly Fuhrman, Kelly McCormick, Eva Chen, Heidi Jiang, Dingfang Shu, Shuaimei Mao & Lera Boroditsky (2011). How Linguistic and Cultural Forces Shape Conceptions of Time: English and Mandarin Time in 3D. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1305-1328.
    In this paper we examine how English and Mandarin speakers think about time, and we test how the patterns of thinking in the two groups relate to patterns in linguistic and cultural experience. In Mandarin, vertical spatial metaphors are used more frequently to talk about time than they are in English; English relies primarily on horizontal terms. We present results from two tasks comparing English and Mandarin speakers’ temporal reasoning. The tasks measure how people spatialize time in three-dimensional space, including (...)
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  3.  3
    Kelly McCormick (forthcoming). A Dilemma for Morally Responsible Time Travelers. Philosophical Studies:1-11.
    In this paper I argue that new attempts to undermine the principle of alternative possibilities via appeal to time travel fail. My argument targets a version of a Frankfurt-style counterexample to the principle recently developed by Spencer. I argue that in avoiding one prominent objection to standard Frankfurt-style counterexamples Spencer’s time travel case runs afoul of another. Furthermore, the very feature of the case which makes it initially appealing also makes it impossible to revise the case such that it can (...)
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  4. Kelly McCormick (2013). Anchoring a Revisionist Account of Moral Responsibility. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 7 (3).
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  5.  19
    Kelly McCormick (2015). Companions in Innocence: Defending a New Methodological Assumption for Theorizing About Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Studies 172 (2):515-533.
    The contemporary philosophical debate on free will and moral responsibility is rife with appeal to a variety of allegedly intuitive cases and principles. As a result, some have argued that many strands of this debate end in “dialectical stalemates,” boiling down to bedrock, seemingly intractable disagreements about intuition . Here I attempt to carve out a middle ground between conventional reliance on appeal to intuition and intuitional skepticism in regards to the philosophical discussion of moral responsibility in particular. The main (...)
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  6.  12
    Kelly McCormick (2014). Holding Responsibility Hostage: Responsibility, Justification, and the Compatibility Question. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (4):623-641.
    Traditional work on moral responsibility has for quite some time focused on the compatibility question: is moral responsibility compatible with determinism ? But there is a second question that has also played a central role, though perhaps less explicitly. Call this second question the justificatory question:Can our reactive attitudes, judgments about moral responsibility, and the attendant practice of moral praising and blaming be rationally maintained and justified?It is not uncommon to take providing an answer to the compatibility question to be (...)
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  7.  3
    Kelly Mccormick (2014). D. Justin Coates and Neal A. Tognazzini , Blame: Its Nature and Norms. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 40 (3):528-534.
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  8. Kelly McCormick (2014). D. Justin Coates and Neal A. Tognazzini , Blame: Its Nature and Norms. Social Theory and Practice 40 (3):528-534.
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  9. Kelly McCormick (2016). Rethinking Responsibility, Written by K.E. Boxer. Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (1):131-134.
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