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Kelly Oliver [85]Kelly A. Oliver [1]
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Profile: Kelly Oliver
  1. Christina Hendricks & Kelly Oliver, Introduction : How to Do (Feminist) Things with Words.
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  2. Kelly Oliver (2013). If You Can't Be Good, Be Careful. Philosophy Today 55 (Supplement):47-55.
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  3. Kelly Oliver (2013). Kristeva's Sadomasochistic Subject and the Sublimation of Violence. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):13-26.
    Do representations of violence incite or quell violent desires and actions? This question--the question of the relation between mimesis and catharsis--is as old as Western Philosophy itself. In this essay, I attempt to think through how Kristeva might describe the difference between representations of violence that perpetuate violent desires and actions versus representations of violence that sublimate violent desires and thereby prevent violent actions.
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  4. Lori Gruen, Kari Weil, Kelly Oliver, Traci Warkentin, Stephanie Jenkins, Carrie Rohman, Emily Clark & Greta Gaard (2012). Introduction. Hypatia 27 (3):492-526.
  5. Lori Gruen, Kari Weil, Kelly Oliver, Traci Warkentin, Stephanie Jenkins, Carrie Rohman, Emily Clark & Greta Gaard (2012). Invited Symposium: Feminists Encountering Animals. Hypatia 27 (3):492 - 526.
  6. Kelly Oliver (2012). Ambivalence Toward Animals and the Moral Community. Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  7. Kelly Oliver (2012). Love Bites! Or Taking Ethics to Heart: Response to Critics on Animal Lessons. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):187-199.
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  8. Kelly Oliver (2012). See Topsy “Ride the Lightning”: The Scopic Machinery of Death. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1):74-94.
    abstract: This essay explores the connections between speculation, spectacle, and the death penalty, particularly insofar as they bear on what is “proper to man” and on the man–animal distinction. Returning to a scene of death from Derrida's seminar The Beast and the Sovereign, specifically the scene of an elephant's autopsy, we see how what he calls “the globalization of the autopsic model” of sovereignty requires the death of the animal (Derrida 2009, 296). Following Derrida, we see how man's dominion over (...)
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  9. Kelly Oliver (2012). The Plight of Ethics. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (2):118-133.
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  10. Kelly Oliver, Cynthia Willett, Julie Willett, Naomi Zack, Anne-Marie Schultz, Jennifer Ingle & Lenore Wright (2012). Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
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  11. Kelly Oliver (2011). Between the She-Wolf and Little Red Riding Hood: The Figure of the Girl in Derrida's The Beast and The Sovereign. Derrida Today 4 (2):257-280.
    This essay explores the important role played by the figure of the virgin girl at the centre of The Beast and The Sovereign. Derrida hints that she may offer a figure between the beast and the sovereign, between the two marionettes of Nature and Culture. Moreover, it seems that she is both what props up the fabled distinction between man and animal and at the same time that upon which man erects himself as sovereign lord and master. Taking Derrida's suggestions (...)
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  12. Kelly Oliver (2011). Deconstructing “Grown Versus Made”. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 7 (16):42-52.
    In this essay, I consider what happens to debates over genetic enhancement when we “deconstruct” the opposition between “grown and made” and the notion of freedom of choice that comes with it. Along with the binary grown and made comes other such oppositions at the center of these debates: chance and choice, accident and deliberation, nature and culture. By deconstructing the oppositions between grown versus made (chance versus choice, or accident versus deliberate), and free versus determined, alternative routes through these (...)
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  13. Kelly Oliver (2011). “If You Can't Be Good, Be Careful”. Philosophy Today 55 (Supplement):47-55.
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  14. Kelly Oliver (2011). Little Hans's Little Sister. Philosophia 1 (1):9-28.
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  15. Kelly Oliver (2010). Animal Ethics: Toward an Ethics of Responsiveness. Research in Phenomenology 40 (2):267-280.
    The concepts of animal, human, and rights are all part of a philosophical tradition that trades on foreclosing the animal, animality, and animals. Rather than looking to qualities or capacities that make animals the same as or different from humans, I investigate the relationship between the human and the animal. To insist, as animal rights and welfare advocates do, that our ethical obligations to animals are based on their similarities to us reinforces the type of humanism that leads to treating (...)
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  16. Kelly Oliver (2010). Enhancing Evolution:Whose Body? Whose Choice? Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):74-96.
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  17. Kelly Oliver (2010). Julia Kristeva's Maternal Passions. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 18 (1):1-8.
    This article critically engages Julia Kristeva’s latest work on maternal passion as an antidote to what she calls “feminine fatigue.” Oliver elaborates, criticizes, and expands Kristeva’s view that maternity can be a model for thinking about passion and its relation to creativity and even to ethics. She relates Kristeva’s thinking about feminine fatigue to contemporary feminism in the United States. .
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  18. Kelly Oliver (2010). Media Representations of Women and the “Iraq War”. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 5 (12):14-22.
    This essay examines media images of women in recent conflicts in the Middle East. From the Abu Ghraib prison abuses to protests in Iran, women have become the public face of violence, carried out and suffered. Women’s bodies are figured as sexual and violent, a potent combination that stirs public imagination and feeds into stereotypes of women as femme fatales or “bombshells.”.
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  19. Kelly Oliver (2010). Motherhood, Sexuality, and Pregnant Embodiment: Twenty-Five Years of Gestation. Hypatia 25 (4):760-777.
    My essay is framed by Hypatia's first special issue on Motherhood and Sexuality at one end, and by the most recent special issue (as of this writing) on the work of Iris Young, whose work on pregnant embodiment has become canonical, at the other. The questions driving this essay are: When we look back over the last twenty-five years, what has changed in our conceptions of pregnancy and maternity, both in feminist theory and in popular culture? What aspects of feminist (...)
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  20. Kelly Oliver (2009). Animal Lessons: How They Teach Us to Be Human. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction: The role of animals in philosophies of man -- Part I: What's wrong with animal rights? -- The right to remain silent -- Part II: Animal pedagogy -- You are what you eat : Rousseau's cat -- Say the human responded : Herder's sheep -- Part III: Difference worthy of its name -- Hair of the dog : Derrida's and Rousseau's good taste -- Sexual difference, animal difference : Derrida's sexy silkworm -- Part IV: It's our fault -- The (...)
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  21. Kelly Oliver (2009). Bodies Against the Law: Abu Ghraib and the War on Terror. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (1):63-80.
    In this essay, I argue that the contemporary notion of law has been reduced to regulations and disciplinary codes that do not and cannot give meaning to our emotional lives and moral sensibilities. As a result, we have increasing numbers of what I call “abysmal individuals” who suffer from a split between law—broadly conceived as that which gives form and structure to social life—and personal embodied sensations of pain and pleasure. My attempt to understand the place of Abu Ghraib within (...)
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  22. Kelly Oliver (2009). Duplicity Makes the Man, or, Can Animals Lie? In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press.
     
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  23. Kelly Oliver (2009). Duplicity Makes the Man. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press. 104.
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  24. Kelly Oliver (2009). Sexual Difference, Animal Difference: Derrida and Difference "Worthy of Its Name". Hypatia 24 (2):54 - 76.
    I challenge the age-old binary opposition between human and animal, not as philosophers sometimes do by claiming that humans are also animals, or that animals are capable of suffering or intelligence, but rather by questioning the very category of "the animal" itself. This category groups a nearly infinite variety of living beings into one concept measured in terms of humans—animals are those creatures that are not human. In addition, I argue that the binary opposition between human and animal is intimately (...)
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  25. Kelly Oliver & S. K. Keltner (eds.) (2009). Psychoanalysis, Aesthetics, and Politics in the Work of Julia Kristeva. State University of New York Press.
    Considers the social and political significance of Kristeva’s oeuvre.
     
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  26. Elizabeth Grosz, Dana Heller, E. Ann Kaplan, Julia Kristeva, Kelly Oliver & Benigno Trigo (2008). Feminist Time Against Nation Time: Gender, Politics, and the Nation-State in an Age of Permanent War. Lexington Books.
     
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  27. Kelly Oliver (2008). Strange Kinship. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (1):101-120.
    The development of the emerging science of ecology influenced the later work of both Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Both use zoology, biology, and ecology intheir attempts to navigate between mechanism and vitalism, but their interpretations and use of the life sciences take them on divergent paths and lead them to radically different conclusions regarding the relationship between man and animal. This essay takes up the problematic of kinship with animals in Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Beyond the texts of these two thinkers are (...)
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  28. Kelly Oliver (2008). What is Wrong with (Animal) Rights? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (3):pp. 214-224.
  29. Kelly Oliver (2008). Women: The Secret Weapon of Modern Warfare? Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 1-16.
    The images from wars in the Middle East that haunt us are those of young women killing and torturing. Their media circulated stories share a sense of shock. They have both galvanized and confounded debates over feminism and women's equality. And, as Oliver argues in this essay, they share, perhaps subliminally, the problematic notion of women as both offensive and defensive weapons of war, a notion that is symptomatic of fears of women's "mysterious" powers.
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  30. Alice A. Jardine, Shannon Lundeen & Kelly Oliver (eds.) (2007). Living Attention: On Teresa Brennan. State University of New York Press.
    Interdisciplinary exploration of the scope and impact of Teresa Brennan’s lifework.
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  31. Kelly Oliver (2007). Innocence, Perversion, and Abu Ghraib. Philosophy Today 51 (3):343-356.
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  32. Kelly Oliver (2007). Stopping the Anthropological Machine: Agamben with Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. Phaenex 2 (2):1-23.
    Agamben maintains that Heidegger continues the work of the anthropological machine by defining Dasein as uniquely open to the closedness of the animal. Yet, Agamben’s own thinking does not so much open up the concept of animal as it attempts to save humanity from the anthropological machine that always produces the animal as the constitutive outside within the human itself. Agamben’s return to religious metaphors at best displaces the binary man-animal with the binary religion-science, and at worst returns us to (...)
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  33. Kelly Oliver (2007). Tropho Ethics. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 15 (1):37-57.
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  34. Jodi Dean, Cathrine Egeland, Elizabeth Grosz, Sara Heinämaa, Lisa Käll, Johanna Oksala, Kelly Oliver, Tiina Rosenberg, Kristin Sampson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (2006). Sex, Breath, and Force: Sexual Difference in a Post-Feminist Era. Lexington Books.
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  35. Kelly Oliver (2004). Ecological Subjectivity: Merleau-Ponty and a Vision of Ethics. Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (1):102-125.
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  36. Kelly Oliver (2004). Forgiveness and Community. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):1-15.
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  37. Kelly Oliver & Lisa Walsh (eds.) (2004). Contemporary French Feminism. OUP Oxford.
    Have we entered a historical moment of 'post-feminism'? This volume presents a timely and convincing 'no'. These essays demonstrate that there is a new generation of French women who take up questions of equality and difference from a position distinct from either first or second wave feminism, a position that often attempts to move beyond the binary of equality and/or difference to a new form of the individual.
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  38. Steven Crowell & Kelly Oliver (2003). Editors' Introduction. Philosophy Today 47 (9999):3-11.
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  39. Mary Beth Mader & Kelly Oliver (2003). French Feminism. In Robert C. Solomon & David L. Sherman (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Continental Philosophy. Blackwell Pub.. 309.
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  40. Kelly Oliver (2003). Forgiveness and Subjectivity. Philosophy Today 47 (3):280-292.
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  41. Kelly Oliver (2003). Repetition to Working-Through. In Ann Cahill & Jennifer Hansen (eds.), The Continental Feminism Reader. Rowman & Littlefield. 168.
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  42. Kelly Oliver (2003). Subjectivity and Subject Position: The Double Meaning of Witnessing. Studies in Practical Philosophy 3 (2):132-143.
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  43. Kelly Oliver (2003). The Morality of American Manhood, Responsibility, and Virility. In Ann Cahill & Jennifer Hansen (eds.), The Continental Feminism Reader. Rowman & Littlefield. 43--4.
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  44. Kelly Oliver (2002). Psychic Space and Social Melancholy. In Kelly Oliver & Steve Edwin (eds.), Between the Psyche and the Social: Psychoanalytic Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. 49--65.
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  45. Kelly Oliver (2002). The Depressed Mother. In Kelly Oliver & Steve Edwin (eds.), Between the Psyche and the Social: Psychoanalytic Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. 49.
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  46. Kelly Oliver & Steve Edwin (eds.) (2002). Between the Psyche and the Social: Psychoanalytic Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
  47. Tamsin Lorraine, Robyn Ferrell, Kelly Oliver, Kalpana Seshadri-Crooks, Frances Restuccia, E. Ann Kaplan, Catherine Peebles, Emily Zakin, Lisa Walsh & Cynthia Willett (2001). Between the Psyche and the Social: Psychoanalytic Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  48. Kelly Oliver (2001). Book Review: Cathryn Vasseleu. Textures of Light: Vision and Touch in Irigaray, Levinas and Merleau-Ponty. New York: Routledge, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (1):106-108.
  49. Kelly Oliver (2001). Book Review: Tamsin Lorraine. Irigaray and Deleuze: Experiments in Visceral Philosophy. Ithaca: New York: Cornell University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (1):100-102.
  50. Kelly Oliver (2001). Irigaray and Deleuze: Experiments in Visceral Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 16 (1):100-102.
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