Search results for 'Kenneth Leeds' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Frank Chessa, Thomas I. Cochrane, Joan MacGregor & Kenneth Leeds (2009). Wanted, Dead or Alive. Hastings Center Report 39 (3):4-6.
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  2.  3
    Anne R. DeWindt (1985). CM Fraser and Kenneth Emsley, Eds., The Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield From October 1639 to September 1640.(The Wakefield Court Rolls Series of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1.) Leeds: Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1977. Paper. Pp. Xxviii, 196.£ 10 (Subscription Price);£ 12.50 (Separate Volume Price). Helen M. Jewell, Ed., The Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield From September 1348 to September 1350.(The Wakefield Court Rolls Series of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 2.) Leeds ... [REVIEW] Speculum 60 (1):146-147.
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  3. in Logical Reconstructions Of Meinong (2004). Types of Negation in Logical Reconstructions of Meinong Andrew Kenneth Jorgensen University of Leeds. Grazer Philosophische Studien 67:21-36.
     
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  4.  2
    J. Kenneth (2003). The Role of Nonprofit* in Health Care. In Peter Joseph Hammer (ed.), Uncertain Times: Kenneth Arrow and the Changing Economics of Health Care. Duke University Press 243.
  5. Stephen Leeds (1999). Gauges: Aharonov, Bohm, Yang, Healey. Philosophy of Science 66 (4):606-627.
    I defend the interpretation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect originally advanced by Aharonov and Bohm, i.e., that it is caused by an interaction between the electron and the vector potential. The defense depends on taking the fiber bundle formulation of electrodynamics literally, or almost literally.
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  6.  79
    Stephen Leeds (2003). Foundations of Statistical Mechanics—Two Approaches. Philosophy of Science 70 (1):126-144.
    This paper is a discussion of David Albert's approach to the foundations of classical statistical menchanics. I point out a respect in which his account makes a stronger claim about the statistical mechanical probabilities than is usually made, and I suggest what might be motivation for this. I outline a less radical approach, which I attribute to Boltzmann, and I give some reasons for thinking that this approach is all we need, and also the most we are likely to get. (...)
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  7. Stephen Leeds (2007). Physical and Metaphysical Necessity. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (4):458–485.
    I propose a different way of thinking about metaphysical and physical necessity: namely that the fundamental notion of necessity is what would ordinarily be called "truth in all physically possible worlds" – a notion which includes the standard physical necessities and the metaphysical ones as well; I suggest that the latter are marked off not as a stricter kind of necessity but by their epistemic status. One result of this reconceptualization is that the Descartes-Kripke argument against naturalism need no longer (...)
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  8. Stephen Leeds (2007). Juhl on Many Worlds. Noûs 41 (3):536–549.
  9. Stephen Leeds (2007). Correspondence Truth and Scientific Realism. Synthese 159 (1):1 - 21.
    I argue that one good reason for Scientific Realists to be interested in correspondence theories is the hope they offer us of being able to state and defend realistic theses in the face of well-known difficulties about modern physics: such theses as, that our theories are approximately true, or that they will tend to approach the truth. I go on to claim that this hope is unlikely to be fulfilled. I suggest that Realism can still survive in the face of (...)
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  10.  41
    Stephen Leeds (1989). Malament and Zabell on Gibbs Phase Averaging. Philosophy of Science 56 (2):325-340.
    In their paper "Why Gibbs Phase Averages Work--The Role of Ergodic Theory" (1980), David Malament and Sandy Zabell attempt to explain why phase averaging over the microcanonical ensemble gives correct predictions for the values of thermodynamic observables, for an ergodic system at equilibrium. Their idea is to bypass the traditional use of limit theorems, by relying on a uniqueness result about the microcanonical measure--namely, that it is uniquely stationary translation-continuous. I argue that their explanation begs questions about the relationship between (...)
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  11.  65
    Stephen Leeds (2002). Perception, Transparency, and the Language of Thought. Noûs 36 (1):104-129.
  12.  53
    Stephen Leeds (1993). Qualia, Awareness, Sellars. Noûs 27 (3):303-330.
  13.  74
    Stephen Leeds (1973). How to Think About Reference. Journal of Philosophy 70 (15):485-503.
  14.  92
    Stephen Leeds (1984). Chance, Realism, Quantum Mechanics. Journal of Philosophy 81 (10):567-578.
  15. Stephen Leeds (2001). Possibility: Physical and Metaphysical. In Carl Gillett & Barry M. Loewer (eds.), Physicalism and Its Discontents. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
  16.  45
    Stephen Leeds (1995). Holes and Determinism: Another Look. Philosophy of Science 62 (3):425-437.
    I argue that Earman and Norton's familiar "hole argument" raises questions as to whether GTR is a deterministic theory only given a certain assumption about determinism: namely, that to ask whether a theory is deterministic is to ask about the physical situations described by the theory. I think this is a mistake: whether a theory is deterministic is a question about what sentences can be proved within the theory. I show what these sentences look like: for interesting theories, a harmless (...)
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  17.  62
    Stephen Leeds & Richard Healey (1996). A Note on Van Fraassen's Modal Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 63 (1):91-104.
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  18.  28
    Stephen Leeds (1997). Incommensurability and Vagueness. Noûs 31 (3):385-407.
  19.  43
    Stephen Leeds (1995). Wheeler--Feynman Again: A Reply to Price. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (3):381-383.
  20.  31
    Stephen Leeds (1975). Two Senses of 'Appears Red'. Philosophical Studies 28 (September):199-205.
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  21.  8
    Stephen Leeds (1981). Kyburg and Fiducial Inference. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):78-91.
  22.  15
    Stephen Leeds (1994). Price on the Wheeler-Feynman Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):288-294.
  23.  17
    Stephen Leeds (1990). Levi's Decision Theory. Philosophy of Science 57 (1):158-168.
    Suppose my utilities are representable by a set of utility assignments, each defined for atomic sentences; suppose my beliefs are representable by a set of probability assignments. Then each of my utility assignments together with each of my probability assignments will determine a utility assignment to non-atomic sentences, in a familiar way. This paper is concerned with the question, whether I am committed to all the utility assignments so constructible. Richard Jeffrey (1984) says (in effect) "no", Isaac Levi (1974) says (...)
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  24.  15
    Stephen Leeds (2000). Tooley on Causation and Probabilities. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (2):223 – 230.
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  25.  10
    Stephen Leeds (1975). A Note on Craigian Instrumentalism. Journal of Philosophy 72 (7):177-184.
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  26.  16
    Kris Rutten & Ronald Soetaert (2013). Narrative and Rhetorical Approaches to Problems of Education. Jerome Bruner and Kenneth Burke Revisited. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):327-343.
    Over the last few decades there has been a strong narrative turn within the humanities and social sciences in general and educational studies in particular. Especially Jerome Bruner’s theory of narrative as a specific ‘mode of knowing’ was very important for this growing body of work. To understand how the narrative mode works Bruner proposes to study narratives ‘at their far reach’—as an art form—and on several occasions he refers to the dramatistic pentad as an important method for ‘unpacking’ narratives. (...)
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  27.  5
    Kris Rutten & Ronald Soetaert (2015). Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):339-347.
    In this article we introduce the special issue Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric, which brings together a number of contributions that were first presented at the conference Rhetoric as Equipment for Living. Kenneth Burke, Culture and Education. Kenneth Burke [1897–1993] is one of the foundational figures in the development of what is known as the ‘new rhetoric’. The aim of the contributions to this special issue is to explore what is pedagogical about Burke’s anthropological (...)
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  28.  5
    Jennifer Richards (2015). Equipment for Thinking: Or Why Kenneth Burke is Still Worth Reading. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):363-375.
    In a market place crowded with practical rhetoric books what educational value could a challenging work such as Kenneth Burke’s A Rhetoric of Motives possibly have? Burke knows but doesn’t use the terminology of the classical art and rather than analysing the persuasive rhetoric of well-known speeches to equip us with strategies, he weaves his way around literary texts, teasing out meanings that their authors something intended, sometimes did not. Yet, despite such difficulties, A Rhetoric of Motives is a (...)
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  29.  9
    Gregory J. Morgan (2001). Bacteriophage Biology and Kenneth Schaffner's Rendition of Developmentalism. Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):85-92.
    In this paper I consider Kenneth Schaffner''s(1998) rendition of ''''developmentalism'''' from the point of viewof bacteriophage biology. I argue that the fact that a viablephage can be produced from purified DNA and host cellularcomponents lends some support to the anti-developmentalist, ifthey first show that one can draw a principled distinctionbetween genetic and environmental effects. The existence ofhost-controlled phage host range restriction supports thedevelopmentalist''s insistence on the parity of DNA andenvironment. However, in the case of bacteriophage, thedevelopmentalist stands on less (...)
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  30.  2
    Alexis Cartonnet (2011). Structuralisme et néoréalisme dans le champ des relations internationales. Le cas de Kenneth Waltz. Astérion 9.
    Cet article esquisse un rapprochement entre un courant de pensée politique, le néoréalisme, et une méthode en sciences humaines, le structuralisme. Ce courant et cette méthode ont suivi des trajectoires séparées, de l’après-guerre à la fin des années soixante-dix, jusqu’à ce que Kenneth Waltz croise ces deux problématiques. Après avoir défini respectivement réalisme et structuralisme, cet article établit leur connexion et tente d’éclairer les raisons pour lesquelles ce rapprochement n’avait pas été conduit jusqu’alors.
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  31.  2
    Bruce Reichenbach (1994). Kenneth C. Bailey 1924-1993. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 67 (4):135 - 136.
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  32. Kenneth Burke, Herbert W. Simons & Trevor Melia (1989). The Legacy of Kenneth Burke.
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  33.  3
    Greig E. Henderson & David Cratis Williams (eds.) (2001). Unending Conversations: New Writings by and About Kenneth Burke. Southern Illinois University Press.
    Previously unpublished writings by and about Kenneth Burke plus essays by such Burkean luminaries as Wayne C. Booth, William H. Rueckert, Robert Wess, Thomas Carmichael, and Michael Feehan make the publication of Unending Conversations a ...
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  34. Kenneth Laine Ketner, Walker Percy & Patrick H. Samway (1995). A Thief of Peirce the Letters of Kenneth Laine Ketner and Walker Percy.
     
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  35. Stan A. Lindsay (1998). Implicit Rhetoric: Kenneth Burke's Extension of Aristotle's Concept of Entelechy. Upa.
    Implicit Rhetoric examines the implications of Kenneth Burke's concept of entelechy, the most transcendent term in Burke's philosophical system. The author discusses Burke's ideas on the existence of 'implicit' rhetoric which goes against Aristotle's view that rhetoric includes an essentially 'explicit' view of criticism.
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  36. Dennis Schulting (2009). Review: Westphal, Kenneth, Kant's Transcendental Proof of Realism. [REVIEW] Kant-Studien 100 (3):382-385.
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  37.  15
    Sydney Shoemaker (2002). Reply to Leeds. Noûs 36 (1):130-136.
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  38. James W. Chesebro, Carole Blair, Celeste Condit & Bernard L. Brock (eds.) (1995). Kenneth Burke and Contemporary European Thought: Rhetoric in Transition. University Alabama Press.
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  39. Gillian Robinson (1994). Reviews : Kenneth Baynes, The Normative Grounds of Social Criticism: Kant, Rawls and Habermas (State University of New York Press, 1992); Janna Thompson, Justice and World Order: A Philosophical Inquiry (Routledge, 1992); Seyla Benhabib, Situating the Self: Gender, Community and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics (Polity, 1992). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 37 (1):165-170.
    Reviews : Kenneth Baynes, The Normative Grounds of Social Criticism: Kant, Rawls and Habermas ; Janna Thompson, Justice and World Order: A Philosophical Inquiry ; Seyla Benhabib, Situating the Self: Gender, Community and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics.
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  40. Stephen Bygrave (2012). Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology. Routledge.
    _Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology_ is a lucid and accessible introduction to a major twentieth-century thinker those ideas have influenced fields as diverse as literary theory, philosophy, linguistics, politics and anthropology. Stephen Bygrave explores the content of Burke's vast output of work, focusing especially on his preoccupation with the relation between language, ideology and action. By considering Burke as a reader and writer of narratives and systems, Bygrave examines the inadequacies of earlier readings of Burke and unfolds his thought within (...)
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  41.  6
    Kenneth Einar Himma (2010). Plantinga's Version of the Free-Will Argument: The Good and Evil That Free Beings Do: Kenneth Einar Himma. Religious Studies 46 (1):21-39.
    According to Plantinga's version of the free-will argument , the existence of free beings in the world who, on the whole, do more good than evil is the greater moral good that cannot be secured by even an omnipotent God without allowing some evil and thereby shows the logical compatibility of God with evil. In this essay, I argue that there are good empirical and moral reasons, from the standpoint of one plausible conception of Christian ethics, to doubt that Plantinga's (...)
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  42.  44
    Lawrence A. Shapiro (2009). A Review of Frederick Adams and Kenneth Aizawa, the Bounds of Cognition. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):267-273.
    In The Bounds of Cognition, Fred Adams and Kenneth Aizawa treat the arguments for extended cognition to withering criticism. I summarize their main arguments and focus special attention on their distinction between the extended cognitive system hypothesis and the extended cognition hypothesis, as well as on their demand for a mark of the mental.
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  43.  2
    Dominic Burbidge (forthcoming). Space for Virtue in the Economics of Kenneth J. Arrow, Amartya Sen and Elinor Ostrom. Journal of Economic Methodology:1-17.
    Virtue ethics interprets human action as pursuing good ends through practices that develop qualities internal to those final goals. The philosophical approach has been identified as critical of economics, leading in turn to the innovative response that by viewing the market as mutually beneficial exchange, economic practice is in fact defendable on virtue ethics grounds. This defends economics using arguments drawn from virtue ethics, but there is a need also to explore space for virtue ethics within economic theory. Examining key (...)
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  44. Kenneth Einar Himma (2009). The Free-Will Defence: Evil and the Moral Value of Free Will: Kenneth Einar Himma. Religious Studies 45 (4):395-415.
    One version of the free-will argument relies on the claim that, other things being equal, a world in which free beings exist is morally preferable to a world in which free beings do not exist . I argue that this version of the free-will argument cannot support a theodicy that should alleviate the doubts about God's existence to which the problems of evil give rise. In particular, I argue that the value thesis has no foundation in common intuitions about morality. (...)
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  45.  21
    Valerie Malhotra Bentz & Wade Kenny (1997). "Body-as-World": Kenneth Burke's Answer to the Postmodernist Charges Against Sociology. Sociological Theory 15 (1):81-96.
    Postmodernism charges that sociological methods project ways of thinking and being from the past onto the future, and that sociological forms of presentation are rhetorical defenses of ideologies. Postmodernism contends that sociological theory presents reified constructs no more based in reality than are fictional accounts. Kenneth Burke's logology predates and adequately addresses postmodernism's valid charges against sociology. At the same time, logology avoids the idealistic tendencies and ethical pitfalls of radical forms of postmodernist deconstruction, which acknowledge neither pretextual and (...)
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  46.  13
    Kenneth Seeskin (1985). Kenneth Seeskin Replies. Philosophy and Literature 9 (2):201-202.
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  47.  34
    Robert F. Hadley (1997). Explaining Systematicity: A Reply to Kenneth Aizawa. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 12 (4):571-79.
    In his discussion of results which I (with Michael Hayward) recently reported in this journal, Kenneth Aizawa takes issue with two of our conclusions, which are: (a) that our connectionist model provides a basis for explaining systematicity within the realm of sentence comprehension, and subject to a limited range of syntax (b) that the model does not employ structure-sensitive processing, and that this is clearly true in the early stages of the network''s training. Ultimately, Aizawa rejects both (a) and (...)
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  48.  24
    Stephen Bygrave (1993). Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology. Routledge.
    In a career of over seventy years, Kenneth Burke has produced a body of challenging and fascinating theoretical work. This work has had a bigger reputation than it has had a readership. Burke has been hailed not only as a strong precursor of the work of Fredric Jameson, Frank Lentriccia, and others, but also as a powerful original thinker whose writings have yet to be grappled with. Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology is a lucid and accessible introduction to (...)
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  49.  3
    Fredric R. Jameson (1978). The Symbolic Inference; Or, Kenneth Burke and Ideological Analysis. Critical Inquiry 4 (3):507-523.
    However this may be, it is clear that the rhetoric of the self in American criticism will no longer do, any more than its accompanying interpretative codes of identity crises and mythic reintegration, and that a post-individualistic age needs new and post-individualistic categories for grasping both the production and the evolution of literary form as well as the semantic content of the literary text and the latter's relationship to collective experience and to ideological contradiction. What is paradoxical about Burke's own (...)
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  50.  6
    Chiara Bassetti (2014). Kenneth Liberman: More Studies in Ethnomethodology. Human Studies 37 (4):597-602.
    I shall confess since the beginning that I have fallen in love with this book. Reasons are as varied as its merits. First, it actually constitutes what the title promises: “More Studies in Ethnomethodology”. This is not just because of the Foreword by Harold Garfinkel and the life-time collaboration of which the latter and the book itself testify between the founder of Ethnomethodology and one of his students, Kenneth Liberman—by now Professor Emeritus with his own experience of “25 years (...)
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