Search results for 'Kenneth Royce Moore' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth Royce Moore (2008). Plato's Fable: On the Mortal Condition in Shadowy Times – Joshua Mitchell. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):539–541.score: 870.0
  2. Kenneth Royce Moore (2011). Morality and Behaviour in Democratic Athens (G.) Herman Morality and Behaviour in Democratic Athens: A Social History. Pp. Xxii + 472, Figs, Ills, Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Cased, £73, US$141 (Paper, £35, US$60). ISBN: 978-0-521-85021-6 (978-0-521-12535-2 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):530-532.score: 870.0
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  3. Dylan Futter (2013). Review of Moore, Kenneth Royce. Plato, Politics and a Practical Utopia.London: Continuum. 2012. ISBN 978-1-4411-5317-3. [REVIEW] Plato - the Internet Journal of the International Plato Society (Plato 12 (2012)).score: 525.0
    In Plato, Politics and a Practical Utopia Kenneth Royce Moore offers a working model of Magnesia, the city of Plato's Laws. His method is to treat the “second-best city” “as if it were a real polis of the ancient world” (p. 82). Moore's conclusion is that Plato has created a “fairly large city”, with some unusual institutional features, but one that is “strangely practical” and firmly grounded in reality (p. ix). The Laws is often said to (...)
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  4. H. F. Moore (1973). Book Review:The Psychology of Knowing J. R. Royce, W. W. Rozeboom. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 40 (2):322-.score: 360.0
  5. J. T. Moore (1980). Beyond Marx and Mach: Aleksandr Bogdanov's "Philosophy of Living Experience." By Kenneth M. Jensen. Modern Schoolman 57 (3):280-281.score: 360.0
  6. John M. Moore (1983). Polybius on the Writing of History Kenneth Sacks: Polybius on the Writing of History. (University of California Publications, Classical Studies, 24.) Pp. Viii + 233. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of California Press, 1981. Paper, $20. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (02):190-192.score: 360.0
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  7. Kenneth Colburn & Mary Moore (2010). Honoring (Recollecting) Our Memory of Peter McHugh as Social Theorist. Human Studies 33 (2):271-279.score: 240.0
    The recent death of Peter McHugh becomes an occasion for the remembrance and recollection of the distinctive form of reflexive or analytic social inquiry, which framed his work and that of his longtime friend and collaborator, Alan Blum. Following dual appointments at York University, Toronto, Canada in 1972, Blum and McHugh’s partnership formed the basis for a community of scholars and students throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. A brief review of McHugh and Blum’s works shows theoretical roots in social (...)
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  8. Andrew Crane, Dirk Ulrich Gilbert, Kenneth E. Goodpaster, Marcia P. Miceli & Geoff Moore (2011). Comments on BEQ's Twentieth Anniversary Forum on New Directions for Business Ethics Research. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):157-187.score: 240.0
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  9. William C. Dennison, Robert J. Orth, Kenneth A. Moore, J. Court Stevenson, Virginia Carter, Stan Kollar, Peter W. Bergstrom & Richard A. Batiuk (forthcoming). Assessing Water Quality with Submersed Aquatic Vegetation. BioScience.score: 240.0
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  10. Doohwan Ahn, Sanda Badescu, Giorgio Baruchello, Raj Nath Bhat, Laura Boileau, Rosalind Carey, Camelia-Mihaela Cmeciu, Alan Goldstone, James Grieve, John Grumley, Grant Havers, Stefan Höjelid, Peter Isackson, Marguerite Johnson, Adrienne Kertzer, J.-Guy Lalande, Clinton R. Long, Joseph Mali, Ben Marsden, Peter Monteath, Michael Edward Moore, Jeff Noonan, Lynda Payne, Joyce Senders Pedersen, Brayton Polka, Lily Polliack, John Preston, Anthony Pym, Marina Ritzarev, Joseph Rouse, Peter N. Saeta, Arthur B. Shostak, Stanley Shostak, Marcia Landy, Kenneth R. Stunkel, I. I. I. Wheeler & Phillip H. Wiebe (2009). Null. The European Legacy 14 (6):731-771.score: 240.0
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  11. Michael S. Moore (2012). Moore's Truths About Causation and Responsibility: A Reply to Alexander and Ferzan. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):445-462.score: 210.0
    In this response to the review of Moore, Causation and Responsibility, by Larry Alexander and Kimberly Ferzan, previously published in this journal, two issues are discussed. The first is whether causation, counterfactual dependence, moral blame, and culpability, are all scalar properties or relations, that is, matters of more-or-less rather than either-or. The second issue discussed is whether deontological moral obligation is best described as a prohibition against using another as a means, or rather, as a prohibition on an agent (...)
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  12. Josiah Royce (1969/2005). The Basic Writings of Josiah Royce. Fordham University Press.score: 210.0
    Now back in print, and in paperback, these two classicvolumes illustrate the scope and quality of Royce’sthought, providing the most comprehensive selection ofhis writings currently available. They offer a detailedpresentation of the viable relationship Royce forgedbetween the local experience of community and thedemands of a philosophical and scientific vision ofthe human situation.The selections reprinted here are basic to any understandingof Royce’s thought and its pressing relevanceto contemporary cultural, moral, and religious issues.
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  13. G. E. Moore (1993). G.E. Moore: Selected Writings. Routledge.score: 210.0
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an (...)
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  14. G. E. Moore, Moore's Margin Notes on Reid.score: 180.0
  15. G. E. Moore (1959). G. E. Moore. Mind 68 (269):1-1.score: 180.0
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  16. Josiah Royce (1916). Words of Professor Royce at the Walton Hotel at Philadelphia, December 29, 1915. Philosophical Review 25 (3):507-514.score: 180.0
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  17. Robert Burch & Josiah Royce (1987). An Unpublished Logic Paper by Josiah Royce. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 23 (2):173 - 204.score: 180.0
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  18. John Fiske, Josiah Royce & Edward Curtis Smith, Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy : Based on the Doctrine of Evolution, with Criticisms on the Positive Philosophy / by John Fiske ; with an Introduction by Josiah Royce ... ; in Four Volumes. [REVIEW]score: 180.0
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  19. S. Moore (2001). In What Follows, We Shall Bring Out as Clearly as Possible These Points of Similarities That Moore's Thinking on Goodness Have with Phenomenological Thinking on Values. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 28:N0 - 2.score: 180.0
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  20. Josiah Royce (1970). The Letters of Josiah Royce. Chicago,University of Chicago Press.score: 180.0
     
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  21. Josiah Royce (1971). The Philosophy of Josiah Royce. New York,Crowell.score: 180.0
     
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  22. Barbara M. Kinach & Carol A. Moore (1991). Kinach/Moore Bibliography (From Page 7). Inquiry 8 (2):13-13.score: 180.0
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  23. G. E. Moore (1986). G.E. Moore: The Early Essays. Temple University Press.score: 180.0
     
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  24. Josiah Royce (1976). The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce. Greenwood Press.score: 180.0
    The possibility of error.--Individuality and freedom.--The temporal and the eternal.--The conception of immortality.--Loyalty and religion.--The idea of the universal community.--The moral burden of the individual.--The realm of grace.--Time and guilt.--Atonement.
     
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  25. Josiah Royce (1952). The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce; Edited, with an Introductory Essay, by Stuart Gerry Brown. [Syracuse, N.Y.]Syracuse University Press.score: 180.0
     
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  26. S. R. Barrett (1990). Book Reviews : Kenneth Moore, Ed., Waymarks. University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Indiana, 1987. Pp. X, 157, $15.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (2):256-257.score: 120.0
  27. Kevin Sauvé (1994). Brooke Noel Moore and Kenneth Bruder, Philosophy: The Power of Ideas, Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):280-281.score: 120.0
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  28. Eliot Deutsch (2011). A Memorial Tribute to Kenneth K. Inada. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):408-408.score: 54.0
    My first meeting with Kenneth I nada was in 1964, when I passed through Hawai‘i, on my way back from India, at the invitation of Charlie Moore, Editor of Philosophy East and West and Director of that summer’s East-West Philosophers’ Conference. Acting for Moore, who was ill at the time of my arrival, Ken, a member of the UH Philosophy faculty, was kind enough to take me on a tour of the UH-Manoa campus; he did so with (...)
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  29. Kenneth Williford (2004). Moore, the Diaphanousness of Consciousness, and Physicalism. Metaphysica 5 (2):133-50.score: 54.0
    I discuss the main features of Moore’s characterization of consciousness in his well-known 1903 “The Refutation of Idealism” and his little-known 1910 “The Subject-Matter of Psychology.” The presentation is somewhere between an expository exercise in the history of analytical ontology and a philosophical engagement with Moore’s interesting claims. Among other things, I argue that Moore’s famous thesis of the “diaphanousness” of consciousness cannot, contrary to Moore’s own claims, be used to undermine physicalism but in fact can (...)
     
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  30. Kenneth Einar Himma, Separation, Risk, and the Necessity of Privacy to Well-Being: A Comment on Adam Moore's Toward Informational Privacy Rights.score: 42.0
    Moore attempts to show that privacy, conceived as "control over access to oneself and to information about oneself" is "necessary" for human well-being. Moore grounds his argument in an analysis of the need for physical separation, which Moore suggests is universal among animal species. Moore notes, "One basic finding of animal studies is that virtually all animals seek periods of individual seclusion or small-group intimacy." Citing several studies involving rats and other animals, Moore points out (...)
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  31. Kenneth W. Stikkers (2001). Royce and Gadamer on Interpretation as the Constitution of Community. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (1):14-19.score: 36.0
  32. Winfield E. Nagley, John M. Koller, S. K. Saksena, Kenneth K. Inada & Abraham Kaplan (1967). Tributes to Charles A. Moore as Philosopher, Teacher, Colleague, Editor, and Conference Director. Philosophy East and West 17 (1/4):7-14.score: 36.0
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  33. Kenneth W. Stikkers (2007). Commentary on Mathew A. Foust, "Tragedy and the Sorrow of Finitude: Reflections on Sin and Death in the Philosophy of Josiah Royce". The Pluralist 2 (2):115 - 118.score: 36.0
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  34. Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press. 244-260.score: 27.0
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the (...)
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  35. Clayton Littlejohn (2010). Moore's Paradox and Epistemic Norms. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):79 – 100.score: 24.0
    We shall evaluate two strategies for motivating the view that knowledge is the norm of belief. The first draws on observations concerning belief's aim and the parallels between belief and assertion. The second appeals to observations concerning Moore's Paradox. Neither of these strategies gives us good reason to accept the knowledge account. The considerations offered in support of this account motivate only the weaker account on which truth is the fundamental norm of belief.
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  36. Guy Fletcher (2008). 'Mill, Moore, and Intrinsic Value'. Social Theory and Practice 34 (4):517-32.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I examine how philosophers before and after G. E. Moore understood intrinsic value. The main idea I wish to bring out and defend is that Moore was insufficiently attentive to how distinctive his conception of intrinsic value was, as compared with those of the writers he discussed, and that such inattentiveness skewed his understanding of the positions of others that he discussed and dismissed. My way into this issue is by examining the charge of inconsistency (...)
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  37. Anthony Brueckner (2009). Moore-Paradoxicality and the Principle of Charity. Theoria 75 (3):245-247.score: 24.0
    In a recent article in Theoria , Hamid Vahid offered an explanation of the phenomenon of Moore-paradoxicality which employed Davidson's Principle of Charity regarding radical interpretation. I argue here that Vahid's explanation fails.
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  38. Timothy Chan (2010). Moore's Paradox is Not Just Another Pragmatic Paradox. Synthese 173 (3):211 - 229.score: 24.0
    One version of Moore’s Paradox is the challenge to account for the absurdity of beliefs purportedly expressed by someone who asserts sentences of the form ‘p & I do not believe that p’ (‘Moorean sentences’). The absurdity of these beliefs is philosophically puzzling, given that Moorean sentences (i) are contingent and often true; and (ii) express contents that are unproblematic when presented in the third-person. In this paper I critically examine the most popular proposed solution to these two puzzles, (...)
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  39. Luca Moretti (2014). The Dogmatist, Moore's Proof and Transmission Failure. Analysis 74 (3):382-389.score: 24.0
    According to Jim Pryor’s dogmatism, if you have an experience as if P, you acquire immediate prima facie justification for believing P. Pryor contends that dogmatism validates Moore’s infamous proof of a material world. Against Pryor, I argue that if dogmatism is true, Moore’s proof turns out to be non-transmissive of justification according to one of the senses of non-transmissivity defined by Crispin Wright. This type of non-transmissivity doesn’t deprive dogmatism of its apparent antisceptical bite.
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  40. Jack Woods (2014). Expressivism and Moore's Paradox. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (5):1-12.score: 24.0
    Expressivists explain the expression relation which obtains between sincere moral assertion and the conative or affective attitude thereby expressed by appeal to the relation which obtains between sincere assertion and belief. In fact, they often explicitly take the relation between moral assertion and their favored conative or affective attitude to be exactly the same as the relation between assertion and the belief thereby expressed. If this is correct, then we can use the identity of the expression relation in the two (...)
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  41. Timothy Chan (2008). Belief, Assertion and Moore's Paradox. Philosophical Studies 139 (3):395 - 414.score: 24.0
    In this article I argue that two received accounts of belief and assertion cannot both be correct, because they entail mutually contradictory claims about Moore’s Paradox. The two accounts in question are, first, the Action Theory of Belief (ATB), the functionalist view that belief must be manifested in dispositions to act, and second, the Belief Account of Assertion (BAA), the Gricean view that an asserter must present himself as believing what he asserts. It is generally accepted also that Moorean (...)
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  42. Amy Kind (2003). Shoemaker, Self-Blindness and Moore's Paradox. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (210):39-48.score: 24.0
    I show how the 'innersense' (quasiperceptual) view of introspection can be defended against Shoemaker's influential 'argument from selfblindness'. If introspection and perception are analogous, the relationship between beliefs and introspective knowledge of them is merely contingent. Shoemaker argues that this implies the possibility that agents could be selfblind, i.e., could lack any introspective awareness of their own mental states. By invoking Moore's paradox, he rejects this possibility. But because Shoemaker's discussion conflates introspective awareness and selfknowledge, he cannot establish his (...)
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  43. John N. Williams (2006). Moore's Paradox and Conscious Belief. Philosophical Studies 127 (3):383-414.score: 24.0
    For Moore, it is a paradox that although I would be absurd in asserting that (it is raining but I don.
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  44. Nikolay Milkov (2004). G. E. Moore and the Greifswald Objectivists on the Given and the Beginning of Analytic Philosophy. Axiomathes 14 (4):361-379.score: 24.0
    Shortly before G. E. Moore wrote down the formative for the early analytic philosophy lectures on Some Main Problems of Philosophy (1910–1911), he had become acquainted with two books which influenced his thought: (1) a book by Husserl's pupil August Messer and (2) a book by the Greifswald objectivist Dimitri Michaltschew. Central to Michaltschew's book was the concept of the given. In Part I, I argue that Moore elaborated his concept of sense-data in the wake of the Greifswald (...)
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  45. Uriah Kriegel (2004). Moore's Paradox and the Structure of Conscious Belief. Erkenntnis 61 (1):99-121.score: 24.0
    Propositions such as <It is raining, but I do not believe that it is raining> are paradoxical, in that even though they can be true, they cannot be truly asserted or believed. This is Moore’s paradox. Sydney Shoemaker has recently ar- gued that the paradox arises from a constitutive relation that holds between first- and second-order beliefs. This paper explores this approach to the paradox. Although Shoemaker’s own account of the paradox is rejected, a different account along similar lines (...)
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  46. Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (2011). Moore's Paradox, Truth and Accuracy. Acta Analytica 26 (3):243-255.score: 24.0
    G. E. Moore famously observed that to assert ‘I went to the pictures last Tuesday but I do not believe that I did’ would be ‘absurd’. Moore calls it a ‘paradox’ that this absurdity persists despite the fact that what I say about myself might be true. Krista Lawlor and John Perry have proposed an explanation of the absurdity that confines itself to semantic notions while eschewing pragmatic ones. We argue that this explanation faces four objections. We give (...)
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  47. Ian Proops (2006). Soames on the Metaphysics and Epistemology of Moore and Russell. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 129 (3):627–635.score: 24.0
    A critical discussion of selected chapters of the first volume of Scott Soames’s Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century. It is argued that this volume falls short of the minimal standards of scholarship appropriate to a work that advertises itself as a history, and, further, that Soames’s frequent heuristic simplifications and distortions, since they are only sporadically identified as such, are more likely confuse than to enlighten the student. These points are illustrated by reference to Soames’s discussions of Russell’s logical (...)
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  48. Michael Cholbi (2009). Moore's Paradox and Moral Motivation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):495-510.score: 24.0
    Assertions of statements such as ‘it’s raining, but I don’t believe it’ are standard examples of what is known as Moore’s paradox. Here I consider moral equivalents of such statements, statements wherein individuals affirm moral judgments while also expressing motivational indifference to those judgments (such as ‘hurting animals for fun is wrong, but I don’t care’). I argue for four main conclusions concerning such statements: 1. Such statements are genuinely paradoxical, even if not contradictory. 2. This paradoxicality can be (...)
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  49. Susana Nuccetelli (2009). Sosa's Moore and the New Dogmatists. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):180-186.score: 24.0
    Abstract: Some seventy years ago, G. E. Moore invoked his own sensory experience (as of a hand before him in the right circumstances), added some philosophical analysis about externality, and took himself to have offered his "Proof" of the existence of an external world. Current neo-Mooreans either reject completely the standard negative assessment of the Proof or qualify it substantially. For Sosa, the Proof can be persuasive, but only when read literally as offering reasons for the conclusion that there (...)
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