56 found
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  1.  35
    James Lee Lindon, Jolaine R. Draugalis, Kenneth V. Iserson & Stephen Joel Coons (1996). Evaluation of a Bioethics Committee Intervention: A Limitation of Medical Treatment Form. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 8 (3):145-156.
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  2.  19
    Kenneth V. Iserson, Floyd B. Goffin & James J. Markham (1989). The Future Functions of Hospital Ethics Committees. HEC Forum 1 (2):63-76.
  3.  30
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1992). No: Bioethics Committees Are Not Responsible for Considering Cost of Care During Case Review. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 4 (1):53-55.
  4.  28
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2001). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):456-458.
    This section is meant to be a mutual effort. If you find an article you think should be abstracted in this section, do not be bashful—submit it for consideration to feature editor Kenneth V. Iserson care of CQ. If you do not like the editorial comments, this will give you an opportunity to respond in the letters section. Your input is desired and anticipated.
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  5.  11
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1998). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Lecture. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):112-114.
    This section is meant to be a mutual effort. If you find an article you think should be abstracted in this section, do not be bashful—submit it for consideration to Kenneth V. Iserson care of CQ. If you do not like the editorial comments, this will give you an opportunity to respond in the letters section. Your input is desired and anticipated.
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  6.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2007). The Three Faces of "Yes": Consent for Emergency Department Procedures. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):42 – 45.
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  7.  7
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2006). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (2).
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  8.  37
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1991). Strategic Planning for Bioethics Committees and Networks. HEC Forum 3 (3):117-127.
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  9.  13
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2011). The Rapid Ethical Decisionmaking Model: Critical Medical Interventions in Resource-Poor Environments. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):108-114.
    Applying bioethical principles can be difficult in resource-poor environments, particularly for Western doctors unfamiliar with these limitations. The challenges become even greater when clinicians must make rapid critical decisions. As the following case in Zambia illustrates, the Rapid Ethical Decisionmaking Model, long used in emergency medicine, is a useful tool in such circumstances.
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  10.  5
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2002). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):106-108.
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  11.  5
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2003). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1).
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  12.  13
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2000). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (4):580-582.
    This section is meant to be a mutual effort. If you find an article you think should be abstracted in this section, do not be bashful—submit it for consideration to feature editor Kenneth V. Iserson care of CQ. If you do not like the editorial comments, this will give you an opportunity to respond in the letters section. Your input is desired and anticipated.
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  13.  13
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1993). Abstracts of Note. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (3):393.
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  14.  12
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1996). The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (4):585.
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  15.  4
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2008). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3).
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  16.  4
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1998). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):230-232.
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  17.  4
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1997). The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):497.
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  18.  5
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2003). Bioethics and Graduate Medical Education: The Great Match. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):61-65.
    Given the money, prestige and power at stake in high-level sports, ethical lapses are hardly surprising. Nor are the rules, people, and organizations we entrust to punish infractions and ensure fair play. Similarly, the high stakes involved in medical education invite ethical slips. Yet, there are not only few referees in this all-important “game,” but also the subject itself has been almost entirely off-limits in the academic literature.
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  19.  5
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1997). Starting at Our Future. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (2):243.
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  20.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2007). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3).
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  21.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1994). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):307.
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  22.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1999). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (1).
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  23.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1999). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Lecture. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2).
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  24.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2004). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (2).
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  25.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1994). The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (4):633.
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  26.  16
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1998). Sperm Donation From a Comatose, Dying Man. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):209-213.
    The patient was a 19-year-old man who was the victim of an accidental head injury. The attending neurosurgeon felt that, due to uncontrollable and repeated elevated intracranial pressures, the patient would die within 48 hours. The patient's mother requested that the neurosurgeon contact a urologist to collect the patient's sperm for implantation into the patient's girlfriend. The neurosurgeon felt that the situation raised a number of ethical issues and requested that the hospital's bioethics committee consider the case.
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  27.  14
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1991). Point and Counterpoint: Should the Ethics Committee Visit the Patient? No: Hec Members Should Not Visit the Patient. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 3 (1):19-22.
  28.  4
    David L. Meyers & Kenneth V. Iserson (1993). Save the Life of the Child. Hastings Center Report 23 (2):46-46.
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  29.  4
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1997). Physician's Guide to Managed Care David B. Nash (Ed.). HEC Forum 9 (4):373-374.
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  30.  16
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2000). Telemedicine: A Proposal for an Ethical Code. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (3):404-406.
    Telemedicine encompasses medical practice, teaching, and research with real-time interactions over distances too great for unaided communication. It includes audio and video transmissions, either separately or combined, and can be done through mechanical or electronic means. In many ways, telemedicine is a subset of medical informatics, itself a rapidly developing field. Prior definitions have been broader, including not only medical practice over distance, but also simple information transfer.
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  31.  2
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1992). Abstracts of Note. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (4):405.
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  32.  2
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1993). The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (1):115.
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  33.  13
    Jorge Hernández-Arriaga, Carlos Aldana-Valenzuela & Kenneth V. Iserson (2001). Jehovah's Witnesses and Medical Practice in Mexico: Religious Freedom, Parens Patriae, and the Right to Life. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):47-52.
    The influx of new groups into society, such as recently established religious groups whose practices differ from societal norms, may disturb relatively stable communities. This instability is exacerbated if these practices contravene long-held fundamental societal tenets, such as the protection of children. This situation now exists in Mexico, where the country's traditional Catholic and secular values clash with those of a religion introduced from the United States, Jehovah's Witnesses. The focal point for these clashes, as it has been elsewhere, is (...)
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  34.  15
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2004). From Creatures to Corpsicles: Man's Search for Immortality. HEC Forum 16 (3):160-172.
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  35.  15
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2007). Has Emergency Medicine Research Benefited Patients? An Ethical Question. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):289-295.
    From an ethical standpoint, the goal of clinical research is to benefit patients. While individual investigations may not yield results that directly improve patients’ evaluation or treatment, the corpus of the research should lead in that direction. Without the goal of ultimate benefit to patients, such research fails as a moral enterprise. While this may seem obvious, the need to protect and benefit patients can get lost in the milieu of clinical research. Many advances in emergency medicine have been based (...)
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  36.  5
    Daniel Callahan, Larry R. Churchill, Denise M. Dudzinski, Carl Elliott, Joseph J. Fins, Renée C. Fox, Michael L. Gross, Lena Halldenius, Matti Häyry & Kenneth V. Iserson (2005). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:355-356.
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  37.  5
    Adrienne Asch, Erika Blacksher, David A. Buehler, Ellen L. Csikai, Francesco Demartis, Joseph J. Fins, Nina Glick Schiller, Mark J. Hanson, H. Eugene Hern Jr & Kenneth V. Iserson (1998). Monica Arruda is a Candidate for the BSN/MSN in the University of Penn-Sylvania School of Nursing and Senior Research Assistant in the Center for Bioethics at Penn. Her Previous Work has Focused on the Commercialization of Genetic Testing. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:7-8.
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  38.  5
    David A. Buehler, Paul Carrick, David DeGrazia, Alan M. Goldberg, Richard N. Hill, Kenneth V. Iserson & Andrew Jameton (1999). Kenneth M. Boyd, MA, BD, Ph. D., is Senior Lecturer in Medical Ethics, Edinburgh University Medical School, Research Director of the Institute of Medical Ethics, and Associate Minister of the Church of St. John the Evangelist, Princes Street, Edinburgh, Scotland. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8:6-7.
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  39.  10
    Jorge Hernández-Arriaga, Victoria Navarrete de Olivares & Kenneth V. Iserson (1999). The Development of Bioethics in Mexico. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):382-385.
    As in other countries, medical ethics in Mexico has rescued the world of philosophical ethics from oblivion. The needs of clinical medicine gave birth to Mexican bioethics. After the growth of scientific and technologic subjects in medical schools, the humanities, such as medical history, deontology, and medical philosophy, were replaced by such core subjects as radiology, pharmacology, and microbiology. Since the 1950s, graduates from Mexican medical schools have not been exposed to any courses in the medical humanities.
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  40.  3
    Kenneth V. Iserson & Ferdinand Schoeman (1992). The Usual Suspects. Hastings Center Report 22 (2):56-57.
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  41.  4
    Simona Giordano, Kenneth Gundle, John Harris, Anne Hunsaker Hawkins, Matti Häyry, Kenneth V. Iserson, Greg Loeben, Terrance McConnell & Ann E. Mills (2005). Walt Davis, MD, MA, is Assistant Professor, Director of Graduate Education and a Member of the University of Virginia's Clinical Ethics Service, at the Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Raanon Gillon, MD, is the Former Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics and Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics, Imperial College, London, England. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:1-2.
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  42.  4
    Richard E. Champlin, Ka Wah Chan, Leonard M. Fleck, John Harris, Matti Häyry, Søren Holm, Kenneth V. Iserson, Lynn A. Jansen & Martin Korbling (2004). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian of the Pamela and Kenneth Fong Optometry and Health Sciences Library. This Library Serves the University of California, Berkeley–University of California, San Francisco Joint Medical Pro-Gram and the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:117-118.
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  43.  4
    Arthur L. Caplan, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Mildred K. Cho, Steve Heilig, John Hubert, Kenneth V. Iserson, Tom Koch & Mark G. Kuczewski (1998). David Buehler, M. Div., MA, is Founder of Bioethika Online Publishers and Also Serves as Chaplain to the University Lutheran Ministry of Providence, Rhode Island. Michael M. Burgess, Ph. D., is Chair in Biomedical Ethics, Centre for Applied Ethics at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:335-336.
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  44.  4
    Kathryn E. Artnak, Erika Blacksher, Michael C. Brannigan, Matti Häyry, Insoo Hyun, Kenneth V. Iserson, Patricia A. Marshall, Maghboeba Mosavel & India J. Ornelas (2008). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17:137-138.
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  45.  2
    Kenneth V. Iserson (1994). Life Versus Death: Exposing a Misapplication of Ethical Reasoning. Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (3):261.
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  46.  8
    Kenneth V. Iserson, Dorothy Rasinski Gregory, Kate Christensen & Marc R. Ofstein (1992). Willful Death and Painful Decisions: A Failed Assisted Suicide. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (2):147.
    The patient was a woman in her 30s who, until the rapid progression of an ultimately fatal neurologic disease, had been a very successful professional, enjoying athletics and an active social life. In the 6 months of swift deterioration, she had gone from being extremely vibrant and energetic to being totally unable to care for her personal needs. There had been no loss of intellectual capacity. Her sister later recounted to Dr. J., the emergency department physician, that she had found (...)
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  47.  3
    David A. Asch, Jeffrey R. Botkin, Katrina A. Bramstedt, Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr, D. Micah Hester, Kenneth V. Iserson & Mark G. Kuczewski (2002). Bette Anton, MLS, is the Head Librarian of the Optometry Library/Health Sciences Information Service. This Library Serves the University of California at Berkeley–University of California at San Francisco Joint Medical Program and the University of California at Berkeley School of Optometry. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11:4-5.
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  48.  3
    Barbara J. Evans, Sven Ove Hansson, Steve Heilig, Ana Smith Iltis, Kenneth V. Iserson, Anita F. Khayat, Greg Loeben, Jerry Menikoff & Rebecca D. Pentz (2004). Nancy Berlinger, Ph. D., M. Div., is Deputy Director and Associate for Religious Studies at The Hastings Center, Garrison, New York. Michael A. DeVita, MD, is Associate Professor of Critical Care Medicine and Internal Medicine and Chair of the UPMC Ethics Committee, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:313-314.
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  49.  6
    Kenneth V. Iserson (2001). Commentary: The (Partially) Educated Patient: A New Paradigm? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):154-156.
    Physician-patient communication is not optimal. It suffers from an imbalance of information and power, misunderstandings and incomplete information transferred between the parties, and time constraints. Time constraints are due to patient volume, physician responsibilities, and explicit or implicit time restrictions imposed by patient insurers or physician employers. Communication is also complicated by a hesitancy to ask questions or give specific information, delays in accessing parties to transfer important information (usually, it is difficult to contact or recontact the physician), and poor (...)
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  50.  7
    Kenneth V. Iserson & Nicki Pesik (2003). Ethical Resource Distribution After Biological, Chemical, or Radiological Terrorism. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (4):455-465.
    In situations with limited medical resources, be they personnel, equipment, or time, clinicians use “triage” to determine which patients receive treatment. What type of treatment a patient receives depends on the triage “lottery” rules in place. Although these rules for sorting patients and distributing resources are standardized for most situations, they must be somewhat altered after overwhelming, nonstandard disasters.
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