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  1. Bruce Ackerman, Richard J. Arneson, Ronald W. Dworkin, Gerald F. Gaus, Kent Greenawalt, Vinit Haksar, Thomas Hurka, George Klosko, Charles Larmore, Stephen Macedo, Thomas Nagel, John Rawls, Joseph Raz & George Sher (2003). Perfectionism and Neutrality: Essays in Liberal Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Editors provide a substantive introduction to the history and theories of perfectionism and neutrality, expertly contextualizing the essays and making the collection accessible.
     
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  2.  30
    Kent Greenawalt (1987). Conflicts of Law and Morality. Oxford University Press.
    Powerful emotion and pursuit of self-interest have many times led people to break the law with the belief that they are doing so with sound moral reasons. This study is a comprehensive philosophical and legal analysis of the gray area in which the foundations of law and morality clash. This objective book views these oblique circumstances from two perspectives: that of the person who faces a possible conflict between the claims of morality and law and must choose whether or not (...)
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  3.  3
    Kent Greenawalt (1989). [Book Review] Religious Convictions and Political Choice. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 8 (2):70-78.
    How far may Americans properly rely on their religious beliefs when they make and defend political decisions? For example, are ordinary citizens or legislators doing something wrong when they consciously allow their decisions respecting abortion laws to be determined by their religious views? Despite its intense contemporary relevance, the full dimensions of this issue have until now not been thoroughly examined. Religious Convictions and Political Choice represents the first attempt to fill this gap. Beginning with an account of the basic (...)
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  4. Kent Greenawalt (2009). Religion and the Constitution: Volume 2: Establishment and Fairness. Princeton University Press.
    Balancing respect for religious conviction and the values of liberal democracy is a daunting challenge for judges and lawmakers, particularly when religious groups seek exemption from laws that govern others. Should students in public schools be allowed to organize devotional Bible readings and prayers on school property? Does reciting "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance establish a preferred religion? What does the Constitution have to say about displays of religious symbols and messages on public property? Religion and the Constitution (...)
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  5.  1
    Kent Greenawalt (1994). Law and Objectivity. Philosophical Review 103 (3):551-553.
    In modern times the idea of the objectivity of law has been undermined by skepticism about legal institutions, disbelief in ideals of unbiased evaluation, and a conviction that language is indeterminate. Greenawalt here considers the validity of such skepticism, examining such questions as: whether the law as it exists provides determinate answers to legal problems; whether the law should treat people in an "objective way," according to abstract rules, general categories, and external consequences; and how far the law is anchored (...)
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  6.  9
    Kent Greenawalt (1986). Discrimination and Reverse Discrimination. Law and Philosophy 5 (1):135-143.
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  7.  1
    Kent Greenawalt (2007). Does God Belong in Public Schools? Princeton University Press.
    Controversial Supreme Court decisions have barred organized school prayer, but neither the Court nor public policy exclude religion from schools altogether. In this book, one of America's leading constitutional scholars asks what role religion ought to play in public schools. Kent Greenawalt explores many of the most divisive issues in educational debate, including teaching about the origins of life, sex education, and when--or whether--students can opt out of school activities for religious reasons.Using these and other case studies, Greenawalt considers how (...)
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  8.  9
    Kent Greenawalt (1987). A Matter of Principle and Law's Empire by Ronald Dworkin. Journal of Philosophy 84 (5):284-291.
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  9.  12
    Kent Greenawalt (1988). Hart's Rule of Recognition and the United States. Ratio Juris 1 (1):40-57.
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  10. Kent Greenawalt (2002). Constitutional and Statutory Interpretation. In Jules L. Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press 268--268.
     
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  11.  4
    Kent Greenawalt (1994). Dualism and its Status. Ethics 104 (3):480-499.
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  12.  1
    Kent Greenawalt (1996). Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press.
    Should "hate speech" be made a criminal offense, or does the First Amendment oblige Americans to permit the use of epithets directed against a person's race, religion, ethnic origin, gender, or sexual preference? Does a campus speech code enhance or degrade democratic values? When the American flag is burned in protest, what rights of free speech are involved? In a lucid and balanced analysis of contemporary court cases dealing with these problems, as well as those of obscenity and workplace harassment, (...)
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  13.  5
    Kent Greenawalt (1998). Justifications, Excuses, and a Model Penal Code for Democratic Societies. Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (1):14-28.
  14. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Too Thin and Too Rich: Distinguishing Features of Legal Positivism. In Robert P. George (ed.), The Autonomy of Law: Essays on Legal Positivism. Oxford University Press 1--13.
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  15.  2
    Kent Greenawalt (1976). Restricting the Right of Privacy: The Burger Court and Claims of Privacy. Hastings Center Report 6 (4):19-20.
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  16.  5
    Kent Greenawalt (1988). Book Review:Law and Morals: Warnock, Gillick and Beyond. Simon Lee. [REVIEW] Ethics 98 (4):848-.
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  17.  1
    Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter Four. Insults, Epithets, and “Hate Speech”. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 47-70.
  18.  5
    Kent Greenawalt (1999). Religion in the Public Square. Philosophical Review 108 (2):293-296.
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  19.  2
    Kent Greenawalt (2001). Vagueness and Judicial Responses to Legal Indeterminacy. Legal Theory 7 (4):433-445.
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  20.  2
    Kent Greenawalt (1989). Law and Objectivity: How People Are Treated. Criminal Justice Ethics 8 (2):31-55.
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  21.  2
    Kent Greenawalt (1993). Religious Grounds in Liberal Politics. Criminal Justice Ethics 12 (2):3-13.
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  22. Kent Greenawalt & Excuses Justifications (1998). A Model Penal Code for Democratic Societies, 17 CRIM. JUST. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Ethics. Cambridge University Press 14--25.
     
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  23. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Contents. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press
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  24. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter Eight. Conclusion: General Lessons. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 150-154.
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  25. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter Five. Campus Speech Codes and Workplace Harassment. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 71-98.
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  26. Kent Greenawalt (2010). Comparative Legal Interpretation. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: dimensions of inquiry -- Speaker intent and convention; linguistic meaning and pragmatics; Vagueness and indeterminacy: three topics in the philosophy of language -- Literary interpretation, performance art, and related subjects -- Religious interpretation -- General theories of interpretation -- Starting from the bottom: informal instructions -- The law of agency -- Wills -- Contracts -- Judicial alterations of textual provisions: Cy Pres and relatives -- Conclusion and a comparison.
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  27. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter One. Introduction: Free Speech Themes. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 1-10.
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  28. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter Seven. Individuals and Communities. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 124-149.
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  29. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter Six. Obscenity. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 99-123.
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  30. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter Three. Flag Burning. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 28-46.
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  31. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Chapter Two. General Principles of Free Speech Adjudication in the United States and Canada. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 11-27.
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  32. Kent Greenawalt (2003). Establishing Religious Ideas: Evolution, Creationism, and Intelligent Design. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 17 (2):321-398.
  33. Kent Greenawalt (2016). From the Bottom Up: Selected Essays. Oxford University Press Usa.
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  34. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Index. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 183-183.
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  35.  16
    Kent Greenawalt (2010). Legal Interpretation: Perspectives From Other Disciplines and Private Texts. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: dimensions of inquiry -- Speaker intent and convention; linguistic meaning and pragmatics; Vagueness and indeterminacy: three topics in the philosophy of language -- Literary interpretation, performance art, and related subjects -- Religious interpretation -- General theories of interpretation -- Starting from the bottom: informal instructions -- The law of agency -- Wills -- Contracts -- Judicial alterations of textual provisions: Cy Pres and relatives -- Conclusion and a comparison.
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  36. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Notes. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press 155-182.
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  37. Kent Greenawalt (1996). Preface. In Fighting Words: Individuals, Communities, and Liberties of Speech. Princeton University Press
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  38. Kent Greenawalt (2009). Religion and the Constitution: Volume I: Free Exercise and Fairness. Princeton University Press.
    Balancing respect for religious conviction and the values of liberal democracy is a daunting challenge for judges and lawmakers, particularly when religious groups seek exemption from laws that govern others. Should members of religious sects be able to use peyote in worship? Should pacifists be forced to take part in military service when there is a draft, and should this depend on whether they are religious? How can the law address the refusal of parents to provide medical care to their (...)
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  39. Kent Greenawalt (2013). Statutory and Common Law Interpretation. Oxford University Press Usa.
    As Kent Greenwalt's second volume on aspects of legal interpretation, this book analyzes statutory and common law interpretation and compares the two. In respect to statutory interpretation, it first asks whether judges are "faithful agents" of the legislature or "independent cooperative partners." It concludes that the obvious answer is that neither simple categorization really fits-that the function of judges involves a combination of roles. The next issue addressed is whether the intent of those in authority (...)
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  40. Leslie Green, Kent Greenawalt, Nancy J. Hirschmann, George Klosko, Mark C. Murphy, John Rawls, Joseph Raz, Rolf Sartorius, A. John Simmons, M. B. E. Smith, Philip Soper, Jeremy Waldron, Richard A. Wasserstrom & Robert Paul Wolff (1998). The Duty to Obey the Law: Selected Philosophical Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The question 'Why should I obey the law?' introduces a contemporary puzzle that is as old as philosophy itself. The puzzle is especially troublesome if we think of cases in which breaking the law is not otherwise wrongful, and in which the chances of getting caught are negligible. Philosophers from Socrates to H.L.A. Hart have struggled to give reasoned support to the idea that we do have a general moral duty to obey the law but, more recently, the greater number (...)
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