Search results for 'Kent Still' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kent Still (2009). The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl: A Historical Development (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 321-322.score: 240.0
  2. Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust & Kent Still (eds.) (2005). Addressing Levinas. Northwestern University Press.score: 240.0
    At a time of great and increasing interest in the work of Emmanuel Levinas, this volume draws readers into what Levinas described as "philosophy itself"--"a discourse always addressed to another." Thus the philosopher himself provides the thread that runs through these essays on his writings, one guided by the importance of the fact of being addressed--the significance of the Saying much more than the Said. The authors, leading Levinas scholars and interpreters from across the globe, explore the philosopher's relationship to (...)
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  3. D. M. Metcalf, E. C. Dodd & J. P. C. Kent (1963). Byzantine Silver Stamps: With an Excursus on the Comes Sacrarum Largitionum by J. P. C. Kent. Journal of Hellenic Studies 83:217.score: 180.0
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  4. Martin Kavka (2005). Review of Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust, Kent Still (Eds.), Addressing Levinas. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (11).score: 150.0
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  5. Robyn Lee (2006). Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust, and Kent Still, Eds., Addressing Levinas Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (3):216-218.score: 150.0
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  6. A. Woodward (2007). Claire Nouvet, Zrinka Stahuljak, and Kent Still, Eds., Minima Memoria: In the Wake of Jean-Francois Lyotard. Philosophy in Review 27 (5):366.score: 150.0
     
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  7. James Kent (2013). Freethought Student Alliance. Australian Humanist, The 110 (110):27.score: 60.0
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  8. Kent H. Redford (2013). The Best Idea Still Being Perfected. BioScience 63 (11):902-903.score: 36.0
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  9. Otis T. Kent (1984). Brentano and the Relational View of Consciousness. Man and World 17 (1):19-52.score: 30.0
    What is consciousness? brentano suggests that consciousness is a simple binary relation between a self and an object. in this paper, i offer a textual clarification and a qualified philosophical defense of brentano's suggestion. in part i, i indicate the ordinary facts of subjective experience that any adequate theory of consciousness must account for. in part ii, i argue on textual grounds that brentano's theory has been misunderstood by chisholm. in part iii, i argue that brentano's theory meets the conditions (...)
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  10. John B. Kent (1928). The Status of the Data of Experience. Journal of Philosophy 25 (23):617-627.score: 30.0
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  11. Arthur Still (1979). Perception and Representation. In Philosophical Problems In Psychology. London: Methuen.score: 30.0
     
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  12. Robyn Carston (2008). Linguistic Communication and the Semantics/Pragmatics Distinction. Synthese 165 (3):321 - 345.score: 24.0
    Most people working on linguistic meaning or communication assume that semantics and pragmatics are distinct domains, yet there is still little consensus on how the distinction is to be drawn. The position defended in this paper is that the semantics/pragmatics distinction holds between (context-invariant) encoded linguistic meaning and speaker meaning. Two other ‘minimalist’ positions on semantics are explored and found wanting: Kent Bach’s view that there is a narrow semantic notion of context which is responsible for providing semantic (...)
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  13. Robyn Carston & Gower Street, Semantics/Pragmatics Distinction.score: 24.0
    Most people working on linguistic meaning or communication assume that semantics and pragmatics are distinct domains, yet there is still little consensus on how the distinction is to be drawn. The position defended in this paper is that the semantics/pragmatics distinction holds between (context-invariant) encoded linguistic meaning and speaker meaning. Two other ‘minimalist’ positions on semantics are explored and found wanting: Kent Bach’s view that there is a narrow semantic notion of context which is responsible for providing semantic (...)
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  14. Cian Dorr (2014). Transparency and the Context-Sensitivity of Attitude Reports. In Manuel García-Carpintero & Genoveva Martí (eds.), Empty Representations: Reference and Non-existence. Oxford University Press. 25-66.score: 24.0
    This paper defends the claim that although ‘Superman is Clark Kent and some people who believe that Superman flies do not believe that Clark Kent flies’ is a logically inconsistent sentence, we can still utter this sentence, while speaking literally, without asserting anything false. The key idea is that the context-sensitivity of attitude reports can be - and often is - resolved in different ways within a single sentence.
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  15. Andrea Onofri (2013). On Non-Pragmatic Millianism. Philosophical Studies 166 (2):305-327.score: 24.0
    Speakers often judge the sentence “Lois Lane believes that Superman flies” to be true and the sentence “Lois Lane believes that Clark Kent flies” to be false. If Millianism is true, however, these sentences express the very same proposition and must therefore have same truth value. “Pragmatic” Millians like Salmon and Soames have tried to explain speakers’ “anti-substitution intuitions” by claiming that the two sentences are routinely used to pragmatically convey different propositions which do have different truth values. “Non-Pragmatic” (...)
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  16. Fred Adams & Ken Aizawa (forthcoming). Why the Mind is Still in the Head. In P. Robbins & M. Aydede (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Philosophical interest in situated cognition has been focused most intensely on the claim that human cognitive processes extend from the brain into the tools humans use. As we see it, this radical hypothesis is sustained by two kinds of mistakes, confusing coupling relations with constitutive relations and an inattention to the mark of the cognitive. Here we wish to draw attention to these mistakes and show just how pervasive they are. That is, for all that the radical philosophers have said, (...)
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  17. Nicholas Shackel (2014). Still Waiting for a Plausible Humean Theory of Reasons. Philosophical Studies 167 (3):607-633.score: 18.0
    In his important recent book Schroeder proposes a Humean theory of reasons that he calls hypotheticalism. His rigourous account of the weight of reasons is crucial to his theory, both as an element of the theory and constituting his defence to powerful standard objections to Humean theories of reasons. In this paper I examine that rigourous account and show it to face problems of vacuity and consonance. There are technical resources that may be brought to bear on the problem of (...)
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  18. Jonas Åkerman & Patrick Greenough (2010). Hold the Context Fixed, Vagueness Still Remains. In Sebastiano Moruzzi & Richard Dietz (eds.), Cuts and Clouds. Oxford University Press. 275--88.score: 18.0
    Contextualism about vagueness (hereafter ‘Contextualism’) is the view that vagueness consists in a particular species of context-sensitivity and that properly accommodating this fact into our semantic theory will yield a plausible solution to the sorites paradox.[1],[2] But Contextualism, as many commentators have noted, faces the following immediate objection: if we hold the context fixed, vagueness still remains, therefore vagueness is not a species of context-sensitivity. Call this ‘the simple objection’.[3] Absent a convincing reply to the simple objection, Contextualism is (...)
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  19. Wai-Hung Wong (2011). What the Skeptic Still Can't Learn From How We Use the Word 'Know'. In J. Bridges, N. Kolodny & W. Wong (eds.), The Possibility of Philosophical Understanding: Reflections on the Thought of Barry Stroud. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
     ’ The Significance of Philosophical Scepticism has been widely read and discussed by philosophers who are interested in skepticism about our knowledge of the external world.1 Some of his later writings on the topic (such as Stroud (1989) and (1994)) are considered essential reading too. This does not, however, mean that what Stroud says about skepticism2 has as much impact on the discussion of skepticism as it deserves. It seems that his insights into the nature of skepticism have been (...)
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  20. Wayne M. Martin (2005). Bubbles and Skulls: The Phenomenological Structure of Self-Consciousness in Dutch Still-Life Painting. In M. Wrathal & Hubert L. Dreyfus (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Phenomenology and Existentialism. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    In this paper I investigate the representation of self-consciousness in the still life tradition in the Netherlands around the time of Descartes’ residence there. I treat the paintings of this tradition as both a phenomenological resource and as a phenomenological undertaking in their own right. I begin with an introductory overview of the still life tradition, with particular attention to semiotic structures characteristic of the vanitas still life. I then focus my analysis on the representation of self-consciousness (...)
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  21. J. Wallach Scott (2010). Gender: Still a Useful Category of Analysis? Diogenes 57 (1):7-14.score: 18.0
    This paper traces the history of uses of the word "gender". It suggests that though "gender" has been recuperated and become commonplace, many issues persist around the way "women" and "men", and the power relations between them, are defined and are evolving. Provided it still allows us to question the meanings attached to the sexes, how they are established and in what contexts, gender remains a useful, because critical, analytical category.
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  22. R. Stecker (2011). Should We Still Care About the Paradox of Fiction? British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):295-308.score: 18.0
    The paradox of fiction presents an inconsistent triad of propositions, all of which are purported to be plausible or difficult to abandon. Here is an instance of the paradox: (1) Sally pities Anna (where Anna is the character Anna Karenina). (2) To pity someone, one must believe that they exist and are suffering. (3) Sally does not believe that Anna exists. Here is the problem. The paradox was formulated during the heyday of the cognitive theory of the emotions when there (...)
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  23. Siu L. Chow (1998). The Null-Hypothesis Significance-Test Procedure is Still Warranted. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):228-235.score: 18.0
    Entertaining diverse assumptions about empirical research, commentators give a wide range of verdicts on the NHSTP defence in Statistical significance. The null-hypothesis significance-test procedure (NHSTP) is defended in a framework in which deductive and inductive rules are deployed in theory corroboration in the spirit of Popper's Conjectures and refutations (1968b). The defensible hypothetico-deductive structure of the framework is used to make explicit the distinctions between (1) substantive and statistical hypotheses, (2) statistical alternative and conceptual alternative hypotheses, and (3) making (...)
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  24. Carol S. Jeffers (2010). A Still Life is Really a Moving Life: The Role of Mirror Neurons and Empathy in Animating Aesthetic Response. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (2):pp. 31-39.score: 18.0
    In the Western aesthetic canon, the still life enjoys a certain prestige; its place in the museum and on the pages of the art history text is secure. Art aficionados who appreciate the character of Cezanne's apples help to ensure the lofty standing of the still life, as do students who admire the dewdrops still glistening on flowers picked and painted in the nineteenth century. For some students, however, it is difficult to understand such veneration. Despite the (...)
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  25. Luca Barlassina (2011). After All, It’s Still Replication: A Reply to Jacob on Simulation and Mirror Neurons. Res Cogitans 8 (1):92-111.score: 18.0
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the simulation theory (ST), mindreading is based on the ability the mind has of replicating others' mental states and processes. Mirror neurons (MNs) are a class of neurons that fire both when an agent performs a goal-directed action and when she observes the same type of action performed by another individual. Since MNs appear to form a replicative mechanism in which a portion of the observer's brain replicates (...)
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  26. Selmer Bringsjord & David A. Ferrucci (1998). Logic and Artificial Intelligence: Divorced, Still Married, Separated ...? [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 8 (2):273-308.score: 18.0
    Though it''s difficult to agree on the exact date of their union, logic and artificial intelligence (AI) were married by the late 1950s, and, at least during their honeymoon, were happily united. What connubial permutation do logic and AI find themselves in now? Are they still (happily) married? Are they divorced? Or are they only separated, both still keeping alive the promise of a future in which the old magic is rekindled? This paper is an attempt to answer (...)
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  27. Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore, Kent Bach on Minimalism for Dummies.score: 18.0
    According to Kent Bach (forthcoming), our book, Insensitive Semantics (IS), suffers from its 'implicit endorsement' of (1): (1) Every complete sentence expresses a proposition (this is Propositionalism, a fancy version of the old grammar school dictum that every complete sentence expresses a complete thought) (Bach (ms.)) In response (C&L, forthcoming), we claim to be unaware of endorsing (1). No argument in IS depends on (1), we say. We don't claim to have shown that that there couldn't be grammatical sentences (...)
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  28. Frank Ackerman (2002). Still Dead After All These Years: Interpreting the Failure of General Equilibrium Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):119-139.score: 18.0
    More than 25 years after the discovery that the equilibrium point of a general equilibrium model is not necessarily either unique or stable, there is still a need for an intuitively comprehensible explanation of the reasons for this discovery. Recent accounts identify two causes of the finding of instability: the inherent difficulties of aggregation, and the individualistic model of consumer behaviour. The mathematical dead end reached by general equilibrium analysis is not due to obscure or esoteric aspects of the (...)
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  29. Daniel Steel (2003). Making Time Stand Still: A Response to Sober's Counter-Example to the Principle of the Common Cause. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):309-317.score: 18.0
    In a recent article, Elliot Sober responds to challenges to a counter-example that he posed some years earlier to the Principle of the Common Cause (PCC). I agree that Sober has indeed produced a genuine counter-example to the PCC, but argue against the methodological moral that Sober wishes to draw from it. Contrary to Sober, I argue that the possibility of exceptions to the PCC does not undermine its status as a central assumption for methods that endeavor to draw causal (...)
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  30. Lesley Wischmann (1987). Dying on the Front Page: Kent State and the Pulitzer Prize. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (2):67 – 74.score: 18.0
    A non?journalist, non?academic examines problems of privacy for innocent victims of news events through the example of John Filo's 1971 Pulitzer Prize photograph of Jeff Miller's body after the killing of four students at Kent State University. The author suggests that photojournalists have responsibility for the publication uses of their photographs, both at the time of first publication and through the years, and argues that photographs which intrude on victims? privacy should never be used for advertising purposes.
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  31. Jacques Derrida (2010). Athens, Still Remains: The Photographs of Jean-François Bonhomme. Fordham University Press.score: 18.0
    At once photographic analysis, philosophical essay, and autobiographical narrative, Athens, Still Remains presents an original theory of photography and throws a fascinating light on Derrida's life and work.The book begins with a sort of ...
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  32. Douglas M. Haynes (2002). Still the Heart of Darkness: The Ebola Virus and the Meta-Narrative of Disease in The Hot Zone. Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (2):133-145.score: 18.0
    Still the Heart of Darkness analyzes Richard Preston's best-selling account of an Ebola virus outbreak in Reston, Virginia in 1989. Through a textual examination of The Hot Zone, this essay demonstrates how Preston grounds his narrative about the threat of rare emerging viruses from the third world in terms of the colonialist discourse about Africa as the white man's grave, most notably Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. By foregrounding previous outbreaks in Africa, Preston simultaneously darkens its landscape and inscribes (...)
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  33. Tim Kraft (2014). Transmission Arguments Against Knowledge Closure Are Still Fallacious. Synthese 191 (12):2617-2632.score: 18.0
    Transmission arguments against closure of knowledge base the case against closure on the premise that a necessary condition for knowledge is not closed. Warfield argues that this kind of argument is fallacious whereas Brueckner, Murphy and Yan try to rescue it. According to them, the transmission argument is no longer fallacious once an implicit assumption is made explicit. I defend Warfield’s objection by arguing that the various proposals for the unstated assumption either do not avoid the fallacy or turn the (...)
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  34. Laura A. Michaelis (1993). 'Continuity' Within Three Scalar Models: The Polysemy of Adverbial Still. Journal of Semantics 10 (3):193-237.score: 18.0
    This study represents an elaboration and revision of König's (1977) account of the synchronic interrelations among three senses of the English adverbial still. These senses at issue are those in which still serves as a marker of a state's continuation to a temporal reference point, as a concessive particle, and as an indicator of marginal membership within a graded category. I argue here that the three semanrically and grammatically distinct senses can be reconciled by the modern speaker, the (...)
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  35. Y. Greenberg (2008). Presupposition Accommodation and Informativity Considerations with Aspectual Still. Journal of Semantics 26 (1):49-86.score: 18.0
    This paper deals with a newly observed phenomenon which lies at the interface of the semantics and pragmatics of aspectual still (as in John is still asleep), namely the fact that still is infelicitous when it appears in past tense sentences whose reference time is not specified by some temporal adverbial or the utterance context. The main claim of the paper is that in such sentences, the truth of the assertion and that of the ‘prior time’ presupposition (...)
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  36. A. Berardinelli (2004). Do Intellectuals Still Exist? The Case of Italy. Diogenes 51 (4):81-88.score: 18.0
    It has never been easy to understand what intellectuals are, whether they still exist, or whether they are vanishing into a huge ‘cultural middle class’ where high culture and mass culture meld into one another. With particular reference to Italy, Alfonso Berardinelli looks back at the undisputed intellectuals of the past, suggesting that they were their own critics and most determined detractors at the same time, yet full of confidence in their capacity to lay down laws for organizing and (...)
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  37. Joan Wallach Scott (2010). Gender: Still a Useful Category of Analysis? Diogenes 57 (1):7-14.score: 18.0
    This paper traces the history of uses of the word “gender”. It suggests that though “gender” has been recuperated and become commonplace, many issues persist around the way “women” and “men”, and the power relations between them, are defined and are evolving. Provided it still allows us to question the meanings attached to the sexes, how they are established and in what contexts, gender remains a useful, because critical, analytical category.
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  38. Marco Bertamini (2001). If a Tree Falls in the Forest and There is Nobody Around, Does Chasles' Theorem Still Apply? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):655-656.score: 18.0
    The limitations of the concept of internalised kinematic geometry have been recognised by Barlow, Hecht, Kubovy & Epstein, and Todorovic. I am in agreement but I still find the perception of curvature in two frames of apparent motion fascinating and I suggest some new directions. [Barlow; Hecht; Kubovy & Epstein; Shepard; Todorovic].
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  39. Camilo J. Cela-Conde (1996). Bipedal/Savanna/Cladogeny Model. Can It Still Be Held? History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (2):213 - 224.score: 18.0
    With the discovery of Australopithecus, the concepts of bipedalism, the emergence of the open savannas, and the separation of pongids and hominids (bipedal-savanna-cladogeny; the BSC model) were integrated in an attempt to interpret the keys to the emergence of man. However, palæoclimatology, palaeoecology, and the morphology of A. ramidus and A. afarensis show that early hominids were better adapted to the tropical forest. Consequently, the BSC model is no longer valid, even though the relationship between open savannas and bipedalism can (...)
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  40. Gijsbert van den Brink (2011). Are We Still Special? Evolution and Human Dignity. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 53 (3):318-332.score: 18.0
    It has recently been argued by both lay people, church leaders and academic philosophers that evolutionary theory – and especially the theory of common ancestry – rules out any adequate notion of human dignity (I). In this paper, this claim is examined and refuted. First of all, when spelled out in a conceptually unambiguous way, it turns out that the evolutionary argument against human dignity hinges on the belief that human uniqueness , as this was traditionally encapsulated in the doctrine (...)
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  41. Craig W. J. Minogue (2011). Is the Foucauldian Conception of Disciplinary Power Still at Work in Contemporary Forms of Imprisonment? Foucault Studies 11:179-193.score: 18.0
    In this article I will identify the position from which I write and the methodology I will employ, and then I will ask: ”Is the Foucauldian conception of disciplinary power still at work in contemporary forms of imprisonment?” I will answer this question in the affirmative and report the results of a case study of the operational philosophy of a contemporary prison in Melbourne Australia while highlighting some key comparative points from Discipline and Punish . How prisoners resist and (...)
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  42. Stephen M. Siviy (2000). It Still Takes at Least Two to Tango. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):264-265.score: 18.0
    The target article provides a useful investigative model for studying social behaviors, but it falls short of establishing a more comprehensive conceptual framework for understanding complex social inter- actions. Social behaviors such as play involve a dynamic and complex interplay between two or more organisms. Even when feed-forward mechanisms are taken into account and the model is anchored to evolutionary theory, the utility of this model is still limited by the conspicuous absence of neurobiological theory and data.
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  43. Marzenna Cyzman (2011). “Lying, Poets Tell the Truth …”. “The Logical Status of Fictional Discourse” by John Searle – a Still Possible Solution to an Old Problem? Logic and Logical Philosophy 20 (4):317-326.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this article is to consider an answer to the question whether Searle’s idea of sentence in a literary text is still relevant. Understanding literary utterances as specific speech acts, pretended illocutions, is inherent in the process of considering the sentence in a literary text in broader terms. Accordingly, it appears necessary to outline it. Reference to other ideas formulated both in the theory of literature as a speech act [R. Ohmann, S. Levin] as well as in (...)
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  44. Franciszek Ryszka (1990). “Mitteleuropa”—Does It Still Exist, or Is It a Mere Geopolitical Abstraction? World Futures 29 (3):218-226.score: 18.0
    (1990). “Mitteleuropa”—Does it still exist, or Is it a mere geopolitical abstraction? World Futures: Vol. 29, The Future of European Integration, pp. 218-226.
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  45. A. Santamaria, A. Merino, O. Vinas & P. Arrizabalaga (2009). Does Medicine Still Show an Unresolved Discrimination Against Women? Experience in Two European University Hospitals. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):104-106.score: 18.0
    Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the (...)
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  46. Kent Dunnington (2007). Chapter Eight The Impassible Suffered: Divine Love and the Doctrine of Divine Impassibility By Kent Dunnington. In Thomas Jay Oord (ed.), The Many Facets of Love: Philosophical Explorations. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 66.score: 18.0
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  47. Robert A. Hutchinson & Steve W. Lindsay (2006). Perceived Nuisance of Mosquitoes on the Isle of Sheppey, Kent, Uk. Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (5):707-712.score: 18.0
    Little is known about the biting nuisance of mosquitoes in the UK, despite the high numbers found in some locations. A telephone questionnaire survey was used to determine the perceived nuisance of biting insects on the Isle of Sheppey, Kent, a place notorious for mosquitoes. Two hundred randomly selected individuals were interviewed and asked if they suffered from mosquito bites. If they answered yes, they were asked to describe where and when they were bitten, and what measures they took (...)
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  48. Robert Louden (2010). The World We Want: How and Why The Ideals of the Enlightenment Still Elude Us. OUP USA.score: 18.0
    The World We Want compares the future world that Enlightenment intellectuals had hoped for with our own world at present. In what respects do the two worlds differ, and why are they so different? To what extent is and isn't our world the world they wanted, and to what extent do we today still want their world? Unlike previous philosophical critiques and defenses of the Enlightenment, the present study focuses extensively on the relevant historical and empirical record first, by (...)
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  49. [deleted]Jayne Morriss, Alexander N. W. Taylor, Etienne B. Roesch & Carien M. van Reekum (2013). Still Feeling It: The Time Course of Emotional Recovery From an Attentional Perspective. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Emotional reactivity and the time taken to recover, particularly from negative, stressful, events, are inextricably linked, and both are crucial for maintaining well-being. It is unclear, however, to what extent emotional reactivity during stimulus onset predicts the time course of recovery after stimulus offset. To address this question, 25 participants viewed arousing (negative and positive) and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) followed by task-relevant face targets, which were to be gender categorised. Faces were presented early (400–1500 (...)
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  50. Toru Shimizu (2003). Toward the Answer, but Still Far to Go. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):569-570.score: 18.0
    The target article about the origin and evolution of the isocortex triggers questions about unresolved issues that still need to be dealt with, including: (1) the evolutionary scenario of the origin of the lateral isocortex, (2) the expansion of the dorsal pallium in nonmammals, and (3) the heterogeneity of the anterior dorsal ventricular ridge.
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