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Kevin Aho [19]Kevin A. Aho [6]
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Profile: Kevin Aho (Florida Gulf Coast University)
  1. Kevin Aho (2014). Existentialism: An Introduction. Polity.
    The book covers secular thinkers such as Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, and Beauvoir as well as religious authors, such as Buber, Dostoevsky, Marcel, and Kierkegaard.
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  2. Kevin Aho (2013). The Body. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury 269.
     
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  3. Kevin A. Aho (2013). Depression and Embodiment: Phenomenological Reflections on Motility, Affectivity, and Transcendence. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):751-759.
    This paper integrates personal narratives with the methods of phenomenology in order to draw some general conclusions about ‘what it means’ and ‘what it feels like’ to be depressed. The analysis has three parts. First, it explores the ways in which depression disrupts everyday experiences of spatial orientation and motility. This disruption makes it difficult for the person to move and perform basic functional tasks, resulting in a collapse or contraction of the life-world. Second, it illustrates how depression creates a (...)
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  4. Kevin Aho, Metontology and the Body-Problem in Being and Time.
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  5. Kevin A. Aho (2012). Assessing the Role of Virtue Ethics in Psychology: A Commentary on the Work of Blaine Fowers, Frank Richardson, and Brent Slife. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):43-49.
    Drawing on the work of Fowers, Richardson, and Slife, this commentary offers an overview and critical assessment of the theory and practice of virtue ethics in psychology. The commentary highlights the importance of a hermeneutic or relational understanding of selfhood and the value of interpreting human meanings within the context of a shared tradition. I conclude with some critical remarks that focus on reconciling the assumptions of naturalism with hermeneutic philosophy, the issue of conservatism in virtue ethics, and problems of (...)
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  6. Kevin Aho & Charles Guignon (2011). Medicalized Psychiatry and the Talking Cure: A Hermeneutic Intervention. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (3):293-308.
    The dominance of the medical-model in American psychiatry over the last 30 years has resulted in the subsequent decline of the “talking cure”. In this paper, we identify a number of problems associated with medicalized psychiatry, focusing primarily on how it conceptualizes the self as a de-contextualized set of symptoms. Drawing on the tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology, we argue that medicalized psychiatry invariably overlooks the fact that our identities, and the meanings and values that matter to us, are created and (...)
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  7. Kevin Aho (2010). The Psychopathology of American Shyness: A Hermeneutic Reading. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (2):190-206.
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  8. Kevin Aho, Robert Audi, Peter A. French, Al Gini, Charles Guignon, Annette Holba, Marcia Homiak, Mike W. Martin & Valerie Tiberius (2010). The Value of Time and Leisure in a World of Work. Lexington Books.
    This book is concerned with how we should think and act in our work, leisure activities, and time utilization in order to achieve flourishing lives. The scope papers range from general theoretical considerations of the value, e.g. 'What is a balanced life?', to specific types of considerations, e.g. 'How should we cope with the effects of work on moral decision-making?'.
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  9. Kevin Aho (2009). Heidegger's Neglect of the Body. State University of New York Press.
    In Heidegger's Neglect of the Body, Kevin A. Aho suggests the critics largely fail to appreciate Heidegger's nuanced understanding of Dasein, which is not to be ...
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  10. James Aho & Kevin Aho (2008). Body Matters: A Phenomenology of Sickness, Disease, and Illness. Lexington Books.
    Written in a jargon-free way, Body Matters provides a clear and accessible phenomenological critique of core assumptions in mainstream biomedicine and explores ways in which health and illness are experienced and interpreted differently in various socio-historical situations. By drawing on the disciplines of literature, cultural anthropology, sociology, medical history, and philosophy, the authors attempt to dismantle common presuppositions we have about human afflictions and examine how the methods of phenomenology open up new ways to interpret the body and to re-envision (...)
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  11. Kevin Aho (2008). Medicalizing Mental Health:A Phenomenological Alternative. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (4):243-259.
    With the increasingly close relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and the American Psychiatric Association (APA) there has been a growing tendency in the mental health professions to interpret everyday emotional suffering and behavior as a medical condition that can be treated with a particular drug. In this paper, I suggest that hermeneutic phenomenology is uniquely suited to challenge the core assumptions of medicalization by expanding psychiatry's narrow conception of the self as an enclosed, biological individual and recognizing the ways in (...)
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  12. Kevin Aho (2008). Rethinking the Psychopathology of Depression. Philosophical Practice 3 (1):207-218.
    The instrumental classification of depression made possible by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual and the widespread pharmacological approach to treatment in mainstream biopsychiatry has generated a cottage industry of criticism. This paper explores the potential shortcomings of the DSM/bio-psychiatric model and introduces the value of philosophical counseling—specifically by means of integrating the insights of Existentialism and Buddhism—as a way to overcome a number of diagnostic and methodological problems. Philosophical counseling, in this regard, is not overly concerned with the objective question (...)
     
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  13. Kevin Aho (2007). Acceleration and Time Pathologies: The Critique of Psychology in Heidegger's Beiträge. Time and Society 16 (1):25-42.
    In his Contributions to Philosophy, Martin Heidegger introduces "acceleration" as one of the three symptoms--along with "calculation" and the "outbreak of massiveness"--of our technological way of "being-in-the-world." In this article, I unpack the relationship between these symptoms and draw a twofold conclusion. First, interpreting acceleration in terms of time pathologies, I suggest the self is becoming increasingly fragmented and emotionally overwhelmed from chronic sensory arousal and time pressure. This experience makes it difficult for us to qualitatively distinguish what matters to (...)
     
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  14. Kevin Aho (2007). Gender and Time: Revisiting the Question of Dasein's Neutrality. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):137-155.
    Many critics have attempted to give an account of a gendered incarnation of Dasein in response to Heidegger’s “neutral” or “asexual” interpretation. In this paper,I suggest gendered readings of Dasein are potentially misleading. I argue Dasein is gendered only to the extent that “the Anyone” (das Man)—understood as relational background of social practices, institutions, and languages—constitutes the space or “clearing” (Lichtung) of intelligibility. However, this reading misrepresents the core motivation of Heidegger’s early project, namely to arrive at “temporality” (Zeitlichkeit) as (...)
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  15. Kevin Aho (2007). Logos and the Poverty of Animals. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 7:109-126.
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  16. Kevin Aho (2007). Logos and the Poverty of Animals: Rethinking Heidegger’s Humanism. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 7:109-126.
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  17. Kevin Aho (2007). Recovering Play; On the Relationship Between Leisure and Authenticity in Heidegger‟ s Thought. Janus Head 10 (1):217-238.
    This paper attempts to reconcile, what appear to be, two conflicting accounts of authenticity in Heidegger’s thought. Authenticity in Being and Time is commonly interpreted in ‘existentialist’ terms as willful commitment and resoluteness in the face of one’s own death but, by the late 1930’s, is reintroduced in terms of Gelassenheit, as a non-willful openness that “lets beings be.” By employing Heidegger’s conception of authentic historicality , understood as the retrieval of Dasein’s past, and drawing on his writings on Hölderlin (...)
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  18. Kevin Aho (2007). Simmel on Acceleration, Boredom, and Extreme Aesthesia. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (4):447-462.
    By focusing on the unique velocity and over-stimulation of metropolitan life, Georg Simmel pioneered an interpretation of cultural boredom that has had a significant impact on contemporary social theory by viewing it through the modern experience of time-pressure and social acceleration. This paper explores Simmel's account of boredom by showing how--in the frenzy of modern life--it has become increasingly difficult to qualitatively distinguish which choices and commitments actually matter to us. Furthermore, this emotional indifference invariably pushes us towards more excessive (...)
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  19. Kevin Aho (2006). Animality Revisited: The Question of Life in Heidegger's Early Freiburg Lectures. Existentia 16 (5-6):379-392.
    Heidegger's assessment of animals in his 1929/30 Freiburg lecture course, The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics, has been the focal point of much recent debate. In this course, it appears Heidegger preserves the prejudices of metaphysical humanism by establishing an opposition between animal "behavior" (Benehmen) and human "comportment" (Verhalten) to the extent that humans, unlike animals, embody an understanding of being and, therefore, encounter beings as such. In this essay, I suggest this distinction can be properly understood only by turning to (...)
     
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  20. Kevin A. Aho (2005). The Missing Dialogue Between Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty: On the Importance of the Zollikon Seminars. Body and Society 11 (2):1-23.
  21. Kevin A. Aho (2004). The Missing Flesh: On Heidegger's Alleged Neglect of the Body. Dissertation, University of South Florida
    One of the traditional metaphysical assumptions that Heidegger's Being and Time challenges is that the disembodied 'theoretical' standpoint has priority over the embodied 'practical' standpoint. Heidegger argues that any act of theoretical reflection is derivative of pre-reflective social practices that we are "always already" familiar with. Some contemporary critics insist they are continuing this project by exploring aspects of our concrete practices that Heidegger's analysis allegedly overlooks, particularly by focusing on the role that the body plays in everyday life. In (...)
     
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  22. Kevin Aho (2003). Why Heidegger Is Not An Existentialist: Interpreting Authenticity And Historicity In Being And Time. Florida Philosophical Review 3 (2):5-22.
    Heidegger's Being and Time is often interpreted as an important contribution to the canon of Existentialist philosophy. This popular interpretation is due largely to the theme of "authenticity" that is carefully developed in Division II. Here, Heidegger explains how we, as human beings, can temporarily sever ourselves from our bondage to a "fallen" public world by owning up to the anxious awareness of our inevitable death. It is in resolutely facing death that we can become individuals for the first time (...)
     
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