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  1. Kevin C. Elliott & Daniel J. McKaughan (forthcoming). Nonepistemic Values and the Multiple Goals of Science. Philosophical Explorations.
    Recent efforts to argue that nonepistemic values have a legitimate role to play in assessing scientific models, theories, and hypotheses typically either reject the distinction between epistemic and nonepistemic values or incorporate nonepistemic values only as a secondary consideration for resolving epistemic uncertainty. Given that scientific representations can legitimately be evaluated not only based on their fit with the world but also with respect to their fit with the needs of their users, we show in two case studies that nonepistemic (...)
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  2. Kevin C. Elliott (2014). Environmental Health Ethics. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (2):238-239.
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  3. Kevin C. Elliott (2014). Financial Conflicts of Interest and Criteria for Research Credibility. Erkenntnis 79 (5):917-937.
    The potential for financial conflicts of interest (COIs) to damage the credibility of scientific research has become a significant social concern, especially in the wake of high-profile incidents involving the pharmaceutical, tobacco, fossil-fuel, and chemical industries. Scientists and policy makers have debated whether the presence of financial COIs should count as a reason for treating research with suspicion or whether research should instead be evaluated solely based on its scientific quality. This paper examines a recent proposal to develop criteria for (...)
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  4. David B. Resnik & Kevin C. Elliott (2014). Bisphenol A and Risk Management Ethics. Bioethics 28 (8).
    It is widely recognized that endocrine disrupting compounds, such as Bisphenol A, pose challenges for traditional paradigms in toxicology, insofar as these substances appear to have a wider range of low-dose effects than previously recognized. These compounds also pose challenges for ethics and policymaking. When a chemical does not have significant low-dose effects, regulators can allow it to be introduced into commerce or the environment, provided that procedures and rules are in place to keep exposures below an acceptable level. This (...)
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  5. Kevin C. Elliott (2013). Douglas on Values: From Indirect Roles to Multiple Goals. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):375-383.
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  6. Kevin C. Elliott (2013). Legally Poisoned: How the Law Puts Us at Risk From Toxicants. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):226 - 229.
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  7. Kevin C. Elliott (2012). Epistemic and Methodological Iteration in Scientific Research. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (2):376-382.
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  8. Justin Weinberg & Kevin C. Elliott (2012). Science, Expertise, and Democracy. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):83-90.
  9. Katherine W. Robinson & Kevin C. Elliott (2011). Environmental Aesthetics and Public Environmental Philosophy. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):175 - 191.
    We argue that environmental aesthetics, and specifically the concept of aesthetic integrity, should play a central role in a public environmental philosophy designed to communicate about environmental problems in an effective manner. After developing the concept of the ?aesthetic integrity? of the environment, we appeal to empirical research to show that it contributes significantly to people?s sense of place, which is, in turn, central to their well-being and motivational state. As a result, appealing to aesthetic integrity in policy contexts is (...)
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  10. Kevin C. Elliott (2010). Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles, Energy Policy, and the Ethics of Expertise. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (4):376-393.
    Relatively few thinkers have attempted to develop a systematic ‘ethics of expertise’ (EOE) that can guide scientists and other technical experts in providing information to the public. This paper argues that the prima facie duty to disseminate information in a manner that does not damage the self-determination of decision makers could fruitfully serve as one of the core principles of an EOE. Moreover, this duty can be fleshed out in promising ways by drawing on the concept of informed consent, which (...)
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  11. Kevin C. Elliott (2010). Nature in Common? Environmental Ethics 32 (1):79-84.
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  12. Kevin Christopher Elliott (2010). Is a Little Pollution Good for You?: Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : societal values and environmental research -- The Hormesis case -- An argument for societal values in policy-relevant research -- Lesson #1 : safeguarding science -- Lesson #2 : diagnosing deliberation -- Lesson #3 : ethics for experts -- The MCS and ED cases.
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  13. Maureen A. O'Malley, Kevin C. Elliott & Richard M. Burian (2010). From Genetic to Genomic Regulation: Iterativity in microRNA Research. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):407-417.
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  14. Kevin C. Elliott (2009). The Ethical Significance of Language in the Environmental Sciences: Case Studies From Pollution Research. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):157 – 173.
    This paper examines how ethically significant assumptions and values are embedded not only in environmental policies but also in the language of the environmental sciences. It shows, based on three case studies associated with contemporary pollution research, how the choice of scientific categories and terms can have at least four ethically significant effects: influencing the future course of scientific research; altering public awareness or attention to environmental phenomena; affecting the attitudes or behavior of key decision makers; and changing the burdens (...)
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  15. Kevin C. Elliott (2008). Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin, James Moor, and John Weckert (Eds.):Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology,:Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. Philosophy of Science 75 (3):405-408.
  16. Charles S. Bryan, Theresa J. Call & Kevin C. Elliott (2007). The Ethics of Infection Control: Philosophical Frameworks. Ethics 28 (9):1077-1084.
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  17. Kevin C. Elliott (2006). An Ethics of Expertise Based on Informed Consent. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):637-661.
    Ethicists widely accept the notion that scientists have moral responsibilities to benefit society at large. The dissemination of scientific information to the public and its political representatives is central to many of the ways in which scientists serve society. Unfortunately, the task of providing information can often give rise to moral quandaries when scientific experts participate in politically charged debates over issues that are fraught with uncertainty. This paper develops a theoretical framework for an “ethics of expertise” (EOE) based on (...)
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  18. Kevin C. Elliott (2006). A Novel Account of Scientific Anomaly: Help for the Dispute Over Low-Dose Biochemical Effects. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):790-802.
    The biological effects of low doses of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals are currently a matter of significant scientific controversy. This paper argues that philosophers of science can contribute to alleviating this controversy by examining it with the aid of a novel account of scientific anomaly. Specifically, analysis of contemporary research on chemical hormesis (i.e., alleged beneficial biological effects produced by low doses of substances that are harmful at higher doses) suggests that scientists may initially describe anomalous phenomena in terms of (...)
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  19. Kevin C. Elliott (2005). Developmental Systems Theory and Human Embryos: A Response to Austriaco. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (2):249-259.
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