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Kevin Carnahan [6]Kevin M. Carnahan [1]
  1. Kevin Carnahan (2013). Religion, and Not Just Religious Reasons, in the Public Square: A Consideration of Robert Audi's and Nicholas Wolterstorff's Religion in the Public Square. Philosophia 41 (2):397-409.
    For the last several decades, philosophers have wrestled with the proper place of religion in liberal societies. Usually, the debates among these philosophers have started with the articulation of various conceptions of liberalism and then proceeded to locate religion in the context of these conceptions. In the process, however, too little attention has been paid to the way religion is conceived. Drawing on the work of Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff, two scholars who are often read as holding opposing views (...)
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  2. Kevin M. Carnahan (2013). What Should a Christian Realist Presume About War? Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (4):410-430.
    Reinhold Niebuhr, the father of Christian realism, died in the early 1970s. Since that time, discussions in theological ethics have been dominated by two competing accounts of just-war rationality: the presumption against harm position (PAH) and the presumption against injustice position (PAI). Starting from the accounts of moral tragedy found in the PAI and PAH positions, this article argues that there are reasons for Christian realists to reject both positions. Basil Mitchell’s account of ‘cumulative case’ argumentation provides a model for (...)
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  3. Kevin Carnahan (2010). The Philosophy of War & Peace. By Jenny Teichman. Heythrop Journal 51 (4):713-713.
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  4. Kevin Carnahan (2008). Perturbations of the Soul and Pains of the Body: Augustine on Evil Suffered and Done in War. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):269-294.
    Many contemporary scholars debate whether war should be conceived as a relative evil or a morally neutral act. The works of Augustine may offer new ways of thinking through the categories of this debate. In an early period, Augustine develops the distinction between evil done and evil suffered. Augustine's early treatments of war locate the saint as detached sage doing only good, and immune from evil suffered. In a middle period, he develops a richer picture of the evil suffered on (...)
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  5. Kevin Carnahan (2008). Violent Democracy. By Daniel Ross. Heythrop Journal 49 (3):525–526.
  6. Kevin Carnahan (2007). Conviction and Conflict: Islam, Christianity and World Order. By Michael Nazir-Ali. Heythrop Journal 48 (4):653–654.
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  7. Kevin Carnahan (2007). Prophetic Realism: Beyond Militarism and Pacifism in an Age of Terror. By Ronald H. Stone. Heythrop Journal 48 (4):655–657.