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Kevin Davey [15]Kevin J. Davey [1]
  1. Paul Anderson & Kevin Davey, American Dissident.
    Ever since, while continuing to develop his liguistic theories, he has been the most prominent US critic both of his country's foreign policy and of the intellectuals and media that give it overwhelming consensual support. "The Responsibility of Intellectuals" was followed by a series of ever more devastating attacks on American policy in Vietnam (collected in American Power and the New Mandarins and At War With Asia ): by 1970, he was far and away the best known intellectual opponent of (...)
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  2. Kevin Davey (2014). Can Good Science Be Logically Inconsistent? Synthese 191 (13):3009-3026.
    Some philosophers have recently argued that contrary to the traditional view, good scientific theories can in fact be logically inconsistent. The literature is now full of case-studies that are taken to support this claim. I will argue however that as of yet no-one has managed to articulate a philosophically interesting view about the role of logically inconsistent theories in science that genuinely goes against tradition, is plausibly true, and is supported by any of the case studies usually given.
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  3. Kevin Davey (2011). Idealizations and Contextualism in Physics. Philosophy of Science 78 (1):16-38.
  4. Kevin Davey (2011). Thermodynamic Entropy and Its Relation to Probability in Classical Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 78 (5):955-975.
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  5. Kevin Davey (2009). What is Gibbs's Canonical Distribution? Philosophy of Science 76 (5):970-983.
    Although the canonical distribution is one of the central tools of statistical mechanics, the reason for its effectiveness is poorly understood. This is due in part to the fact that there is no clear consensus on what it means to use the canonical distribution to describe a system in equilibrium with a heat bath. I examine some traditional views as to what sort of thing we should take the canonical distribution to represent. I argue that a less explored alternative, according (...)
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  6. Kevin Davey (2008). The Justification of Probability Measures in Statistical Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 75 (1):28-44.
    According to a standard view of the second law of thermodynamics, our belief in the second law can be justified by pointing out that low-entropy macrostates are less probable than high-entropy macrostates, and then noting that a system in an improbable state will tend to evolve toward a more probable state. I would like to argue that this justification of the second law is unhelpful at best and wrong at worst, and will argue that certain puzzles sometimes associated with the (...)
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  7. Kevin Davey (2007). Alexander Pruss the Principle of Sufficient Reason: A Reassessment. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006). Pp. XIII+335. £48.00 (Hbk). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 43 (4):500-503.
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  8. Kevin Davey (2007). Aristotle, Zeno, and the Stadium Paradox. History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (2):127 - 146.
  9. Kevin Davey & Mark Lippelmann (2007). Closed Systems, Explanations, and the Cosmological Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):89 - 101.
    Examples involving infinite suspended chains or infinite trains are sometimes used to defend perceived weaknesses in traditional cosmological arguments. In this article, we distinguish two versions of the cosmological argument, suggest that such examples can only be relevant if it is one specific type of cosmological argument that is being considered, and then criticize the use of such examples in this particular type of cosmological argument. Our criticism revolves around a discussion of what it means to call a system closed, (...)
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  10. Kevin Davey, Justification in Statistical Mechanics.
    According to a standard view of the second law of thermodynamics, our belief in the second law can be justified by pointing out that low entropy macrostates are less probable than high entropy macrostates, and then noting that a system in an improbable state will tend to evolve toward a more probable state. I would like to argue that this justification of the second law of thermodynamics is fundamentally flawed, and will show that some puzzles sometimes associated with the second (...)
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  11. Kevin Davey (2006). Debating Design: From Darwin to DNA - Edited by William A. Dembski and Michael Ruse. Philosophical Books 47 (4):383-386.
  12. Kevin Davey (2003). Is Mathematical Rigor Necessary in Physics? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):439-463.
    Many arguments found in the physics literature involve concepts that are not well-defined by the usual standards of mathematics. I argue that physicists are entitled to employ such concepts without rigorously defining them so long as they restrict the sorts of mathematical arguments in which these concepts are involved. Restrictions of this sort allow the physicist to ignore calculations involving these concepts that might lead to contradictory results. I argue that such restrictions need not be ad hoc, but can sometimes (...)
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  13. Kevin Davey (2002). Obligation and the Conditional in Stit Theory. Studia Logica 72 (3):339-362.
    In this paper, we consider two different ways in which modus-ponens type reasoning with conditional obligations may be formalized. We develop necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of each, and make some philosophical observations about the differences between the minor premises that each formalization requires. All this is done within the context of the Belnap-Perloff stit theory.
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  14. Kevin Davey & Rob Clifton (2001). Insufficient Reason in the ‘New Cosmological Argument’. Religious Studies 37 (4):485-490.
    In a recent article in this journal, Richard Gale and Alexander Pruss offer a new cosmological proof for the existence of God relying only on the Weak Principle of Sufficient Reason, W-PSR. We argue that their proof relies on applications of W-PSR that cannot be justified, and that our modal intuitions simply do not support W-PSR in the way Gale and Pruss take them to.
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  15. Kevin J. Davey (1994). Inseparability in Recursive Copies. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 68 (1):1-52.
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