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  1. Kevin Gibson, William Bottom & J. Keith Murnighan (forthcoming). Once Bitten: Defection and Reconciliation in a Cooperative Enterprise. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  2. Kevin Gibson (2012). Rethinking the Discourse. Philosophy Now 88:16-18.
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  3. Kevin Gibson (2012). Stakeholders and Sustainability: An Evolving Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (1):15-25.
    This conceptual article has three parts: In the first, I discuss the shortcomings of treating the environment as a stakeholder and conclude that doing so is theoretically vague and lacks prescriptive force. In the second part, I recommend moving from broad notions of preserving nature and appeals to beauty to a more concrete analytic framework provided by the idea of human sustainability. Using sustainability as the focus of concern is significant as it provides us with a more tenable and quantifiable (...)
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  4. Kevin Gibson (2011). Toward an Intermediate Position on Corporate Moral Personhood. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):71-81.
    Models of moral responsibility rely on foundational views about moral agency. Many scholars believe that only humans can be moral agents, and therefore business needs to create models that foster greater receptivity to others through ethical dialog. This view leads to a difficulty if no specific person is the sole causal agent for an act, or if something comes about through aggregated action in a corporate setting. An alternate approach suggests that corporations are moral agents sufficiently like humans to be (...)
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  5. Kevin Gibson & John R. Boatright (2011). Letters and Responses. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):527-531.
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  6. Kevin Gibson (2009). Profit From the Priceless: Heritage Sites, Property Rights and the Duty to Preserve. Business and Society Review 114 (3):327-348.
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  7. Kevin Gibson (2007). Ethics and Business: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    In this lively undergraduate textbook, Kevin Gibson explores the relationship between ethics and the world of business, and how we can serve the interests of both. He builds a philosophical groundwork that can be applied to a wide range of issues in ethics and business, and shows readers how to assess dilemmas critically and work to resolve them on a principled basis. Using case studies drawn from around the world, he examines topics including stakeholder responsibilities, sustainability, corporate social responsibility, and (...)
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  8. Kevin Gibson (2003). Contrasting Role Morality and Professional Morality: Implications for Practice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):17–29.
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  9. Kevin Gibson (2003). Games Students Play: Incorporating the Prisoner's Dilemma in Teaching Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):53-64.
    The so-called "Prisoner''s Dilemma" is often referred to in business ethics, but probably not well understood. This article has three parts: (1) I claim that models derived from game theory are significant in the field for discussions of prudential ethics and the practical decisions managers make; (2) I discuss using them as a practical pedagogical exercise and some of the lessons generated; (3) more speculatively, I suggest that they are useful in discussions of corporate personhood.
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  10. Kevin Gibson (2002). Going Beyond Intuitions: Reclaiming the Philosophy in Business Ethics. Teaching Business Ethics 6 (2):151-166.
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  11. Kevin Gibson (2000). The Moral Basis of Stakeholder Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 26 (3):245 - 257.
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  12. Kevin Gibson (1999). David Fritzsche: Business Ethics: A Global and Managerial Perspective. Teaching Business Ethics 3 (2):197-199.
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  13. Kevin Gibson (1999). Joanne B. Cuilla, Ethics: The Heart of Leadership. Teaching Business Ethics 3 (2):201-203.
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  14. Kevin Gibson (1999). Mediation in the Medical Field: Is Neutral Intervention Possible? Hastings Center Report 29 (5):6-13.
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  15. Kevin Gibson (1997). Larry May, The Socially Responsive Self Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (3):188-190.
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  16. Kevin Gibson (1996). Is the Numbering System in Wittgenstein's Tractatus a Joke? Journal of Philosophical Research 21:139-148.
    Many commentators have dismissed Wittgenstein’s numbering system in the Tractatus as either incoherent or a joke. In this paper I offer a way to rehabilitate the system along the lines of Wittgenstein’s own instructions. Reading the Tractatus in this way not only offers a way to make sense of the numbering, but also offers a significant improvement in examining the meaning of the text.
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  17. Kevin Gibson (1995). Fictitious Persons and Real Responsibilities. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (9):761 - 767.
    I believe that corporations should be held responsible for their actions. Traditional discussions about the moral responsibility of an organization have relied on a model of criminal intent. Demonstrating intent demands that we find a moral agent capable of intending, and this has led to problems. Here I replace the analysis based on criminal law by one based on tort law. Under this framework I suggest that corporations can be held responsible for the harms caused by their activities even if (...)
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  18. Kevin Gibson (1994). Business Ethics and Engineering Ethics. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):19-21.
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  19. Kevin Gibson (1994). Harmony, Hobbes and Rational Negotiation: A Reply to Dees and Cramton's Promoting Honesty in Negotiation. Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):373-381.
    Dees and Cramton have argued that we should take a deontological stand to make negotiations more ethical (“Promoting Honesty in Negotiation: An Exercise in Practical Ethics” BEQ, Vol. 3, #3). I suggest that their analysis is overdetermined, and that one can, in fact, reach the same conclusions through a Hobbesian approach to negotiation. I suggest that an equally valid way to develop ethical negotiation is through the consequentialist “Harmony Thesis” which posits that moral behavior is coextensive with beneficial results.
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  20. Kevin Gibson (1994). Harmony, Hobbes and Rational Negotiation. Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):373-381.
    Dees and Cramton have argued that we should take a deontological stand to make negotiations more ethical (“Promoting Honesty in Negotiation: An Exercise in Practical Ethics” BEQ, Vol. 3, #3). I suggest that their analysis is overdetermined, and that one can, in fact, reach the same conclusions through a Hobbesian approach to negotiation. I suggest that an equally valid way to develop ethical negotiation is through the consequentialist “Harmony Thesis” which posits that moral behavior is coextensive with beneficial results.
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  21. Kevin Gibson (1993). Transitivity, Torts, and Kingdom Loss. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:83-96.
    Here I look at the views of Mackie about the transitivity of causal statements. Mackie suggests that we replace total transitivity with a calculation which assigns a proportional value to partial causes; this allows us to work out an overall proportion of a single event in a causal chain. I marry the philosophical discussion with a sketch of tort law by means of an unusual hypothetical. I suggest that Mackie’s proportional analysis could be have a useful practical application since current (...)
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  22. Kevin Gibson (1989). Ranken on Disharmony and Business Ethics. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):209-214.
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