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  1. Kevin Melchionne (2013). Leddy, Thomas. The Extraordinary in the Ordinary: The Aesthetics of Everyday Life. Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press, 2012, 275 Pp., $32.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):296-298.
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  2. Kevin Melchionne (2013). The Definition of Everyday Aesthetics.'. Contemporary Aesthetics 11.
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  3. Kevin Melchionne (2011). A New Problem for Aesthetics. Contemporary Aesthetics 9.
    The essay introduces the problem of aesthetic unreliability, the variety of ways in which it is difficult to grasp our aesthetic experience and the consequent confusion and unreliability of what we take as our taste.
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  4. Kevin Melchionne (2010). On the Old Saw “I Know Nothing About Art but I Know What I Like&Quot;. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):131-141.
    The theory of taste faces a neglected epistemological problem. The cultivation of taste is functionally dependent upon self-knowledge of aesthetic satisfaction and its causes, in other words, knowing what we like and why. However, reservations about the reliability of our knowledge of our responses, commonplace in social psychology and the philosophy of mind, pose serious obstacles to the theory of taste. I argue for a weak fallibilism with respect to introspective beliefs about aesthetic experience. I call for a naturalistic approach (...)
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  5. Kevin Melchionne, Acquired Taste. Contemporary Aesthetics.
    Acquired taste is an integral part of the cultivation of taste. In this essay, I identify acquired taste as a form of intentional belief acquisition or adaptive preference formation, distinguishing it from ordinary or discovered taste. This account of acquired taste allows for the role of self-deception in the development of taste. I discuss the value of acquired taste in the overall development of taste as well as the ways that an over-reliance on acquired taste can distort overall taste.
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  6. Kevin Melchionne (2007). Why Artists Starve. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):142-148.
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  7. Kevin Melchionne (2002). Front Yards. In Arnold Berleant (ed.), The Environment and the Arts. Ashgate Press.
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  8. Kevin Melchionne (1999). Collecting as an Art. Philosophy and Literature 23 (1):148-156.
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  9. Kevin Melchionne (1999). Of Bookworms and Busybees: Cultural Theory in the Age of Do-It-Yourselfing. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):247-255.
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  10. Kevin Melchionne (1998). Artistic Dropouts. In Carolyn Korsmeyer (ed.), Aesthetics: The Big Questions.
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  11. Kevin Melchionne (1998). Living in Glass Houses: Domesticity, Interior Decoration, and Environmental Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):191-200.
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  12. Kevin Melchionne (1998). Re-Thinking Site-Specificity in Public Art: Some Critical and Philosophical Problems. In Donald Kuspit (ed.), Art Criticism. 36-49.
  13. Kevin Melchionne (1996). Book Review: Collecting: An Unruly Passion: Psychological Perspectives. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):524-526.
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