31 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Kevin Decker
Profile: Kevin S. Decker (Eastern Washington University)
  1.  92
    Kevin S. Decker (2008). The Evolution of the Psychical Element: George Herbert Mead at the University of Chicago: Lecture Notes by H. Heath Bawden 1899–1900: Introduction. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 469-479.
    George Herbert Mead's early lectures at the University of Chicago are more important to understanding the genesis of his views in social psychology than some commentators, such as Hans Joas, have emphasized. Mead's lecture series "The Evolution of the Psychical Element," preserved through the notes of student H. Heath Bawden, demonstrate his devotion to Hegelianism as a method of thinking and how this influenced his non-reductionistic approach to functional psychology. In addition, Mead's breadth of historical knowledge as well as his (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  25
    George Herbert Mead, H. Heath Bawden & Kevin S. Decker (2008). The Evolution of the Psychical Element, By George Herbert Mead (Dec. 1899–March 1900 or 1898–1899). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):480-507.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  24
    Kevin S. Decker (2010). Playing Doctor. The Philosophers' Magazine 51:93-96.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  20
    Kevin S. Decker (2013). There Are No Universal Ethical Principles That Should Govern the Conduct. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons 25--27.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  22
    Kevin S. Decker (2009). Teaching Autonomy and Emergence Through Pop Culture. Teaching Philosophy 32 (4):331-343.
    Teaching Kantian ethics is difficult, for “getting Kant right” extends to a wide field of concerns. This paper is aimed at instructors who wish to give interdisciplinary criticism of Kantian deontology by discussing exceptions naturalist critics take to Kant’s concept of “autonomy.” This concept can and should be supplanted by the notion of “emergent intelligence.” Surprising support for this project comes from the fictional exploits of Star Trek’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard. I conclude by indicating how the residual lessons from this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  36
    Kevin S. Decker (2000). The Limits of Radical Openness. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 4 (1):5-32.
    To what extent can the structure of dialogue be used to ground a theory of human understanding? In this paper, I examine Plato’s Phaedo, Republic, and Philebus with an eye toward challenging Gadamer’s thesis that Socratic dialogue grounds a theory of hermeneutics that characterizes understanding as a factor within experience as “radical openness.” I contend that there is a basic problem in Gadamer’s historical appropriation of the dialectic. This is that the elenchtic ideal of most of the early dialogues of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  18
    Kevin S. Decker (2002). John Dewey's Liberalism. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 30 (92):31-35.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  18
    Kevin S. Decker (2012). Perspectives and Ideologies: A Pragmatic Use for Recognition Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (2):215-226.
    ‘Recognition’ is a normative concept denoting the ascription of positive status to a group or an individual by (an) other(s). In its larger meaning, it carries the implication that when a group or an individual can justifiably expect such a positive status-ascription, its denial (misrecognition) is unjustified and unethical. I discuss the role that the concept of recognition can play at the intersection of two philosophies, pragmatism and contemporary critical theory. My perspective is one that embraces the ‘pragmatic turn’ in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  13
    H. Heath Bawden & Kevin S. Decker (2008). The Evolution of the Psychical Element, by George Herbert Mead (Dec. 1899–March 1900 or 1898–1899). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):480 - 507.
    George Herbert Mead's lectures at the University of Chicago are more important to understanding Mead's views on social psychology than some commentators, such as Hans Joas, have emphasized. Mead's 1898-99 lecture series, preserved through the notes of his student H. Heath Bawden, demonstrate his devotion to Hegelianism as a method of thinking and how this influenced his non-reductive approach to functionalist psychology. In addition, Mead's breadth of historical knowledge and his commitments in the natural and social sciences are on display (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  5
    Kevin S. Decker (2000). The Open System and Its Enemies. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (4):599-620.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Kevin S. Decker (2001). Andrew Light and Mechthild Nagel, Eds., Race, Class, and Community Identity Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (5):354-356.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  4
    Kevin S. Decker (2003). Dewey and the Democratic Way of Life. Philosophy Now 43:16-19.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  1
    Kevin S. Decker (2013). Sitting Downtown at Kentucky Fried Chicken. In Robert Arp & Kevin S. Decker (eds.), The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah! Wiley-Blackwell 194--207.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  1
    Robert Arp & Kevin S. Decker (2013). Introduction “Well, I'm Afraid It's About to Happen Again”. In Robert Arp & Kevin S. Decker (eds.), The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah! Wiley-Blackwell
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Robert Arp & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) (2013). The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah! Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Enlightenment from the _South Park_ gang faster than you can say, "Screw you guys, I'm going home"!_ _The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah!_ presents a compilation of serious philosophical reflections on the twisted insights voiced by characters in TV’s most irreverent animated series. Offers readers a philosophically smart and candid approach to one of television’s most subversive and controversial shows as it enters its 17th season Draws sharp parallels between the irreverent nature of _South Park_ and the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Robert Arp & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) (2013). The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah! Wiley.
    _Enlightenment from the _South Park_ gang faster than you can say, "Screw you guys, I'm going home"!_ _The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah!_ presents a compilation of serious philosophical reflections on the twisted insights voiced by characters in TV’s most irreverent animated series. Offers readers a philosophically smart and candid approach to one of television’s most subversive and controversial shows as it enters its 17th season Draws sharp parallels between the irreverent nature of _South Park_ and the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Robert Arp, Kevin S. Decker & William Irwin (eds.) (2013). The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah! Wiley.
    _Enlightenment from the _South Park_ gang faster than you can say, "Screw you guys, I'm going home"!_ _The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah!_ presents a compilation of serious philosophical reflections on the twisted insights voiced by characters in TV’s most irreverent animated series. Offers readers a philosophically smart and candid approach to one of television’s most subversive and controversial shows as it enters its 17th season Draws sharp parallels between the irreverent nature of _South Park_ and the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  66
    Richard Brown & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) (2009). Terminator and Philosophy: I'll Be Back, Therefore I Am. John Wiley & Sons.
    A timely book that uses science fiction to provoke reflection and discussion on philosophical issues From the nature of mind to the ethics of AI and neural enhancement, science fiction thought experiments fire the philosophical imagination, encouraging us to think outside of the box about classic philosophical problems and even to envision new ones. Science Fiction and Philosophy explores puzzles about virtual reality, transhumanism, whether time travel is possible, the nature of artificial intelligence, and topics in neuroethics, among other timely (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Kevin S. Decker & William Irwin (eds.) (2013). Ender's Game and Philosophy: The Logic Gate is Down. Wiley.
    A threat to humanity portending the end of our species lurks in the cold recesses of space. Our only hope is an eleven-year-old boy. Celebrating the long-awaited release of the movie adaptation of Orson Scott Card’s novel about highly trained child geniuses fighting a race of invading aliens, this collection of original essays probes key philosophical questions raised in the narrative, including the ethics of child soldiers, politics on the internet, and the morality of war and genocide. Original essays dissect (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Kevin S. Decker (2013). Reply to Pullman. In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. John Wiley & Sons 25--39.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Kevin S. Decker & Jason T. Eberl (2005). Star Wars and Philosophy. Open Court.
    The essays in this volume tackle the philosophical questions from these blockbuster films including: Was Anakin predestined to fall to the Dark Side? Are the Jedi truly role models of moral virtue? Why would the citizens and protectors of a democratic Republic allow it to descend into a tyrannical empire? Is Yoda a peaceful Zen master or a great warrior, or both? Why is there both a light and a dark side of the Force? Star Wars and Philosophy ponders the (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Robert Arp, Kevin S. Decker & William Irwin (eds.) (2013). The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy. Wiley.
    _Enlightenment from the _South Park_ gang faster than you can say, "Screw you guys, I'm going home"!_ _The Ultimate South Park and Philosophy: Respect My Philosophah!_ presents a compilation of serious philosophical reflections on the twisted insights voiced by characters in TV’s most irreverent animated series. Offers readers a philosophically smart and candid approach to one of television’s most subversive and controversial shows as it enters its 17th season Draws sharp parallels between the irreverent nature of _South Park_ and the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  18
    Kevin S. Decker (2013). Who is Who?: The Philosophy of Doctor Who. I.B. Tauris.
    This is the first in-depth philosophical investigation of Doctor Who in popular culture.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  13
    Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (2007). Star Trek and Philosophy. Open Court.
    Philosophy and space travel are characterized by the same fundamental purpose: exploration. An essential guide for both philosophers and Trekkers, Star Trek and Philosophy combines a philosophical spirit of inquiry with the beloved television and film series to consider questions not only about the scientific prospects of interstellar travel but also the inward journey to examine the human condition. The expansive topics range from the possibilities for communication among different cultural backgrounds to questions about the stoic temperament exhibited by Vulcans (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Jason T. Eberl, Kevin S. Decker & William Irwin (eds.) (2015). The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Jason T. Eberl, Kevin S. Decker & William Irwin (eds.) (2015). The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) (2015). The Ultimate Star Wars and Philosophy: You Must Unlearn What You Have Learned. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Kevin S. Decker & William Irwin (eds.) (2013). Ender's Game and Philosophy. Wiley.
    A threat to humanity portending the end of our species lurks in the cold recesses of space. Our only hope is an eleven-year-old boy. Celebrating the long-awaited release of the movie adaptation of Orson Scott Card’s novel about highly trained child geniuses fighting a race of invading aliens, this collection of original essays probes key philosophical questions raised in the narrative, including the ethics of child soldiers, politics on the internet, and the morality of war and genocide. Original essays dissect (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. William Irwin, Richard Brown & Kevin S. Decker (2009). Terminator and Philosophy: I'll Be Back, Therefore I Am. Wiley.
    A timely book that uses science fiction to provoke reflection and discussion on philosophical issues From the nature of mind to the ethics of AI and neural enhancement, science fiction thought experiments fire the philosophical imagination, encouraging us to think outside of the box about classic philosophical problems and even to envision new ones. Science Fiction and Philosophy explores puzzles about virtual reality, transhumanism, whether time travel is possible, the nature of artificial intelligence, and topics in neuroethics, among other timely (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. William Irwin, Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (2016). The Ultimate Star Trek and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. William Irwin, Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (2016). The Ultimate Star Trek and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography