Search results for 'Kevin Scott Amidon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kevin Scott Amidon (2007). Carrie Chapman Catt and the Evolutionary Politics of Sex and Race, 1885-1940. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (2):305-328.score: 870.0
  2. Kevin S. Amidon (2008). Adolf Meyer-Abich, Holism, and the Negotiation of Theoretical Biology. Biological Theory 3 (4):357-370.score: 240.0
  3. Kevin S. Amidon & Mark P. Worrell (2008). A.R.L. Gurland, the Frankfurt School, and the Critical Theory of Antisemitism. Telos 2008 (144):129-147.score: 240.0
    “Just for the record, however: I don't hate Communists.” So wrote Arcadius Rudolph Lang Gurland to his longtime friend, colleague, and collaborator Otto Kirchheimer in 1958.1 Behind this straightforward statement lay over thirty years of Gurland's experience as a passionate scholar, spokesperson, and advocate of that most dialectical of the many forms of socialist politics, revolutionary social democracy. Throughout his peripatetic life of near-constant exile in Russia, Germany, France, and the United States as student, journalist, theoretician, researcher, writer, teacher, and (...)
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  4. Kevin S. Amidon & Zachary Gray Sanderson (2012). On Subjectivity and the Risk Pool; or, Žižek's Lacuna. Telos 2012 (160):121-138.score: 240.0
  5. Dominic Scott (1999). Aristotle on Well-Being and Intellectual Contemplation: Dominic Scott. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):225–242.score: 210.0
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being (eudaimonia) with one activity (intellectual contemplation), sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, the best (...)
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  6. Kathryn P. Scott & Deborah Martin Floyd (1991). Floyd and Scott, From Page 13. Inquiry 8 (4):26-26.score: 180.0
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  7. William T. Scott (1981). Report From Bill Scott On Polanyi Biography. Tradition and Discovery 8 (2):2-3.score: 180.0
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  8. Mary Scott (1996). Scott Adams. Business Ethics 10 (4):26-29.score: 180.0
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  9. Drusilla Scott (1986). Scott Replies to Harker Letter. Tradition and Discovery 14 (2):25-26.score: 180.0
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  10. C. B. Cohen, S. E. Wheeler & D. A. Scott (2000). Prayer is Therapy-Cynthia B. Cohen, Sondra E. Wheeler, and David A. Scott Reply. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):5-5.score: 180.0
     
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  11. Joan Wallach Scott (1995). A Response to Joan Wallach Scott. In Jeffrey Williams (ed.), Pc Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy. Routledge.score: 180.0
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  12. David Scott (2007). Critical Essays on Major Curriculum Theorists. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This volume offers a critical appreciation of the work of 16 leading curriculum theorists through critical expositions of their writings. Written by a leading name in Curriculum Studies, the book includes a balance of established curriculum thinkers and contemporary curriculum analysts from education as well as philosophy, sociology and psychology. With theorists from the UK, the US and Europe, there is also a spread of political perspectives from radical conservatism through liberalism to socialism and libertarianism. Theorists included are: John Dewey, (...)
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  13. Stuart R. Hameroff & A. C. Scott (1998). A Sonoran Afternoon: A Dialogue on Quantum Mechanics and Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.score: 60.0
    _Sonoran Desert, Stuart Hameroff and Alwyn Scott awoke from their_ _siestas to take margaritas in the shade of a ramada. On a nearby_ _table, a tape recorder had accidentally been left on and the following_ _is an unedited transcript of their conversation._.
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  14. Gualtiero Piccinini & Sam Scott (2006). Splitting Concepts. Philosophy of Science 73 (4):390-409.score: 60.0
    A common presupposition in the concepts literature is that concepts constitute a singular natural kind. If, on the contrary, concepts split into more than one kind, this literature needs to be recast in terms of other kinds of mental representation. We offer two new arguments that concepts, in fact, divide into different kinds: ( a ) concepts split because different kinds of mental representation, processed independently, must be posited to explain different sets of relevant phenomena; ( b ) concepts split (...)
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  15. Thomas R. Scott (2012). Neuroscience May Supersede Ethics and Law. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):433-437.score: 60.0
    Abstract Advances in technology now make it possible to monitor the activity of the human brain in action, however crudely. As this emerging science continues to offer correlations between neural activity and mental functions, mind and brain may eventually prove to be one. If so, such a full comprehension of the electrochemical bases of mind may render current concepts of ethics, law, and even free will irrelevant. Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11948-012-9351-1 Authors Thomas R. (...)
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  16. Andrew Scott (2013). Legal Responses to Some of the New Developments in Reproductive Technologies Part.3 The Future of Reproductive Technologies and the Law. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 8 (2):24 - 28.score: 60.0
    Legal Responses to some of the New Developments in Reproductive Technologies Part.3 The Future of Reproductive Technologies and the Law Content Type Journal Article Pages 24-28 Authors Andrew Scott, L.L.B., University of Aberdeen, Scotland Journal Human Reproduction & Genetic Ethics Online ISSN 2043-0469 Print ISSN 1028-7825 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 2 / 2002.
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  17. Jill Scott, Love and Sex: A Threesome.score: 60.0
    "Smooth groove poetry set to smooth groove R&B" or "soul-hip-hop-tinged feel music" � these are a couple of ways to describe Jill Scott�s sensational new work. Whatever Scott may lack in total vocal control, her maturity, her poetry jumps straight into your face addressing a full range of love and emotion themes: from the platonic to the incidental to the passionate to the forlornful. Each sentiment connects to an appropriate musical production ranging from the sultry classy sounds of (...)
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  18. Henry G. Liddell & Robert Scott (forthcoming). Rhuthmos. Rhuthmos.score: 60.0
    H. G. Liddell & R. Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, rev. and aug. by Sir H. S. Jones. with the ass. of R. McKenzie, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1940. ῥυθμός , Ion. ῥυσμός (v. infr. 111, IV), ὁ : (ῥέω) :— A. any regular recurring motion (“πᾶς ῥ. ὡρισμένῃ μετρεῖται κινήσει” Arist.Pr.882b2) : I. measured motion, time, whether in sound or motion, Democr.15c ; = ἡ τῆς κινήσεως τάξις, Pl.Lg.665a, cf. 672e ; “ὁ ῥ. ἐκ τοῦ ταχέος (...) - Études grecques (...)
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  19. Edwin E. Slosson, Walter Dill Scott, Frederick Shipp Deibler, Willard Eugene Hotchkiss & Stuart Chase (eds.) (1929). Society Today. New York, D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc..score: 60.0
    --The energy of the new world, By E. E. Slosson.--The new energies and the new man, by W. D. Scott.--The future of our economic system, by F S. Deibler.--Business in the new era, by W. B. Hotchkiss.--Consumers in the modern world, by Stuart Chase.
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  20. Kevin Crotty (2011). Homeric Similes (W.C.) Scott The Artistry of the Homeric Simile. Pp. Viii + 267. Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England, 2009. Paper, US$45. ISBN: 978-1-58465-797-2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (1):12-14.score: 36.0
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  21. Michael Scott (2007). Distinguishing the Senses. Philosophical Explorations 10 (3):257 – 262.score: 30.0
    Seeing, hearing and touching are phenomenally different, even if we are detecting the same spatial properties with each sense. This presents a prima facie problem for intentionalism, the theory that phenomenal character supervenes on representational content. The paper reviews some attempts to resolve this problem, and then looks in detail at Peter Carruthers' recent proposal that the senses can be individuated by the way in which they represent spatial properties and incorporate time. This proposal is shown to be ineffective in (...)
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  22. Charles E. Scott (1971). Self-Consciousness Without an Ego. Man and World 4 (May):193-201.score: 30.0
  23. Thomas C. Scott-Phillips, Kevin N. Laland, David M. Shuker, Thomas E. Dickins & Stuart A. West, The Niche Construction Perspective: A Critical Appraisal.score: 24.0
    Niche construction refers to the activities of organisms that bring about changes in their environments, many of which are evolutionarily and ecologically consequential. Advocates of niche construction theory (NCT) believe that standard evolutionary theory fails to recognize the full importance of niche construction, and consequently propose a novel view of evolution, in which niche construction and its legacy over time (ecological inheritance) are described as evolutionary processes, equivalent in importance to natural selection. Here, we subject NCT to critical evaluation, in (...)
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  24. Kristin M. Madison, Kevin G. Volpp & Scott D. Halpern (2011). The Law, Policy, and Ethics of Employers' Use of Financial Incentives to Improve Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):450-468.score: 24.0
    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) turns to a nontraditional mechanism to improve public health: employer-provided financial incentives for healthy behaviors. Critics raise questions about incentive programs' effectiveness, employer involvement, and potential discrimination. We support incentive program development despite these concerns. The ACA sets the stage for a broad-based research and implementation agenda through which we can learn to structure incentive programs to not only promote public health but also address prevalent concerns.
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  25. Gillman Payette & Peter K. Schotch (2014). Remarks on the Scott–Lindenbaum Theorem. Studia Logica 102 (5):1003-1020.score: 24.0
    In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Dana Scott introduced a kind of generalization (or perhaps simplification would be a better description) of the notion of inference, familiar from Gentzen, in which one may consider multiple conclusions rather than single formulas. Scott used this idea to good effect in a number of projects including the axiomatization of many-valued logics (of various kinds) and a reconsideration of the motivation of C.I. Lewis. Since he left the subject it has been (...)
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  26. Brian Francis Scarlett (2012). Obituary: William Kevin Presa. Sophia 51 (4):581-582.score: 24.0
    In this obituary, I detail the life and contribution of William Kevin Presa.
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  27. Andrew B. Irvine (forthcoming). Introduction: A Symposium on Kevin Schilbrack's Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto. Sophia:1-3.score: 24.0
    It is an exciting time to pursue philosophy of religion, not least because of an earnest and widening conversation about what philosophers of religion should be doing in the future. This conversation is driven by factors including the growing presence of philosophers who do not presume as normative the subject position of so-called western traditions of thought, the relentless historicization—especially along Foucaultian lines—of the modern study of religion (or ‘religion’) by critics working across the range of implicated disciplines, and by (...)
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  28. Jamie Iredell (2011). Belief: An Essay. Continent 1 (4).score: 24.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 279—285. Concerning its Transitive Nature, the Conversion of Native Americans of Spanish Colonial California, Indoctrinated Catholicism, & the Creation There’s no direct archaeological evidence that Jesus ever existed. 1 I memorized the Act of Contrition. I don’t remember it now, except the beginning: Forgive me Father for I have sinned . . . This was in preparation for the Sacrament of Holy Reconciliation, where in a confessional I confessed my sins to Father Scott, who looked like (...)
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  29. Annette D. Digby, Gadi Alexander, Carole G. Basile, Kevin Cloninger, F. Michael Connelly, Jessica T. DeCuir-Gunby, John P. Gaa, Herbert P. Ginsburg, Angela McNeal Haynes, Ming Fang He, Terri R. Hebert, Sharon Johnson, Patricia L. Marshall, Joan V. Mast, Allison W. McCulloch, Christina Mengert, Christy M. Moroye, F. Richard Olenchak, Wynnetta Scott-Simmons, Merrie Snow, Derrick M. Tennial, P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Shijing Xu & JeongAe You (2010). Cultivating Curious and Creative Minds: The Role of Teachers and Teacher Educators, Part I. R&L Education.score: 24.0
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  30. Andrew B. Irvine (forthcoming). On Kevin Schilbrack's Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto. Sophia:1-6.score: 24.0
    Kevin Schilbrack’s recent book sets out a series of well-considered, well-wrought arguments promoting a lively future for philosophy of religion. In the following comments on selected chapters, I seek to raise questions that require further elaboration of Schilbrack’s constructive vision and/or distinction from alternative visions with which he disagrees.Chapter 1: ‘The Full Task of Philosophy of Religion’Schilbrack begins this chapter characterizing ‘traditional philosophy of religion’ (TPR) in terms of the task that the discipline sets for itself: to evaluate the (...)
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  31. Andrew Norris (2013). 'How Can It Not Know What It Is?': Self and Other in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):19-50.score: 24.0
    In this essay I provide a reading of Ridley Scott's Blade Runner that focuses upon the question of the kind of creatures the Replicants are depicted as being, and the meaning that depiction should have for us. I draw upon Stanley Cavell's account of the problem of other minds to argue that the empathy test is in fact a mode of resisting the acknowledgment of others. And I draw upon Martin Heidegger's account of authenticity and mortality to argue that (...)
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  32. Scott R. Stroud, Kevin J. Harrelson, Jake E. Stone, Richard Dien Winfield, Sonja Tanner, Bernard Freydberg & Robert Metcalf (2013). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2).score: 24.0
     
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  33. J. Kevin O'Regan & Ned Block (2012). Discussion of J. Kevin O'Regan's “Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.score: 21.0
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of (...)
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  34. Alex M. McAllister (2002). Bounded Scott Set Saturation. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 48 (2):245-259.score: 21.0
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  35. David J. Chalmers, Response to Scott Soames on Two-Dimensionalism.score: 18.0
    At the April 2006 meeting of the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association, in an author-meets-critics session on Scott Soames' book _Reference and Description: The Case Against Two-Dimensionalism_ , I presented a comment on Soames' book, "Scott Soames' Two-Dimensionalism" . The other critic was Robert Stalnaker. Soames presented his response to critics . Below is a reply to Soames' response to me, for those who were at the session and interested others. Note that this response was mostly (...)
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  36. Paul Stob (2013). John Dewey and the Artful Life: Pragmatism, Aesthetics, and Morality by Scott R. Stroud (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (3):360-366.score: 18.0
    During his long career, John Dewey produced an almost endless number of pages of dense philosophical prose, giving those interested in his work plenty to do. Even scholars of rhetoric have found a host of reasons to return to Dewey’s corpus, despite the fact that Dewey himself seemed, at best, uninterested in rhetoric. Two recent works—Robert Danisch’s Pragmatism, Democracy, and the Necessity of Rhetoric and Nathan Crick’s Democracy and Rhetoric: John Dewey on the Arts of Becoming—have already fruitfully mined Dewey’s (...)
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  37. David J. Chalmers, Scott Soames' Two-Dimensionalism.score: 18.0
    Scott Soames’ Reference and Description contains arguments against a number of different versions of two-dimensional semantics. After early chapters on descriptivism and on Kripke’s anti-descriptivist arguments, a chapter each is devoted to the roots of twodimensionalism in “slips, errors, or misleading suggestions” by Kripke and Kaplan, and to the two-dimensional approaches developed by Stalnaker (1978) and by Davies and Humberstone (1981). The bulk of the book (about 200 pages) is devoted to “ambitious twodimensionalism”, attributed to Frank Jackson, David Lewis, (...)
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  38. P. M. S. Hacker, Scott Soames's Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century.score: 18.0
    Scott Soames’s two volume work Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century1 won the American 2003 Award for Best Professional/Scholarly Book in Philosophy. It has been said to be ‘a marvellous introduction to analytic philosophy’, to deliver much ‘solid information on this dense and difficult subject’, and it has been predicted to become the standard history of twentieth-century analytic philosophy.2 Professor Soames writes clearly and candidly. At the beginning of each volume he delineates his objectives and leitmotivs. He is concerned (...)
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  39. Herbert Hochberg & Kevin Mulligan (2005). Review of Herbert Hochberg, Kevin Mulligan (Eds.), Relations and Predicates. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).score: 18.0
    This book is presumably a collection of essays delivered at a conference, though it's hard to say. There is no cover description and the editors' introduction, where this information might have been found, is missing from the volume (at least from my copy) in spite of being listed in the table of contents. A curious editorial slip. In fact, from an editorial perspective this book is a disaster. Not only is the format reminiscent of those camera ready volumes that jammed (...)
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  40. Christopher Pincock, Comments on Scott Soames, Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century, Volume I.score: 18.0
    Scott Soames has given us a clear, engaging but ultimately unsatisfying introduction to the history of analytic philosophy. Based on Soames’ impressive work in the philosophy of language, when these two volumes appeared I had high hopes that he would be successful. There is certainly a need for an introductory survey of the history of analytic philosophy. Currently, there is no resource for the beginning student or the amateur historian that will summarize our current understanding of the origins and (...)
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  41. Quentin Smith (1995). Marcus and the New Theory of Reference: A Reply to Scott Soames. Synthese 104 (2):217 - 244.score: 18.0
    This paper is a reply to some of Scott Soames' comments on my colloquium paper Marcus, Kripke, and the Origin of the New Theory of Reference. Except for the indicated parts added in May, 1995, this paper was written on December 16th–25th, 1994 as my reply to Soames for the APA colloquium in Boston, December 28, 1994. In this paper, I argue that Soames' contention that Marcus is not one of the primary founders of contemporary nondescriptivist (...)
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  42. Derek A. McDougall (2014). Scott Soames on Gilbert Ryle. Philosophical Investigations 37 (2):113-129.score: 18.0
    In his exceptionally well-received history of analytic philosophy,1 Scott Soames presents accounts of the work of Wittgenstein and Ryle that rest on his acceptance of metaphysical preconceptions that these philosophers implicitly question in their writings. Their shared expressive third-person treatments of the mind, for example, serve to emphasise the inadequacy of Soames's distinction between private mental states and physical states/behaviour, which he regularly employs in assessing their views. His treatment of Gilbert Ryle in particular, reflects the radically different conceptions (...)
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  43. William Dembski, Commentary on Eugenie Scott and Glenn Branch's "Guest Viewpoint: 'Intelligent Design' Not Accepted by Most Scientists," 7/2/02. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    The National School Boards Association enlisted Eugenie Scott and Glenn Branch to criticize intelligent design bullet point fashion. Here I want to respond to these bullet-point assertions. I would repeat the entire article, but copyright restrictions prevent me. The article is available at http://nsba.org/sbn/02-jul/070202-8.htm.
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  44. Kevin C. Klement (2012). Kevin C. Klement. Theoria 78:146-167.score: 18.0
    Most advocates of the so-called “neologicist” movement in the philosophy of mathematics identify themselves as “Neo-Fregeans” (e.g., Hale and Wright): presenting an updated and revised version of Frege’s form of logicism. Russell’s form of logicism is scarcely discussed in this literature, and when it is, often dismissed as not really logicism at all (in lights of its assumption of axioms of infinity, reducibiity and so on). In this paper I have three aims: firstly, to identify more clearly the primary metaontological (...)
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  45. Pierluigi Minari (1986). On the Extension of Intuitionistic Propositional Logic with Kreisel-Putnam's and Scott's Schemes. Studia Logica 45 (1):55 - 68.score: 18.0
    LetSKP be the intermediate prepositional logic obtained by adding toI (intuitionistic p.l.) the axiom schemes:S = (( ) ) (Scott), andKP = ()()() (Kreisel-Putnam). Using Kripke's semantics, we prove:1) SKP has the finite model property; 2) SKP has the disjunction property. In the last section of the paper we give some results about Scott's logic S = I+S.
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  46. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2013). Reply to Kevin Carnahan and Erik A. Anderson. Philosophia 41 (2):429-435.score: 18.0
    In my response to Kevin Carnahan, I explain the concept of religion that I have been working with in my writings on the place of religious reasons in public political discourse. While acknowledging that religion is often privatized, my concern has been with religion as a way of life. It is religion so understood that raises the most serious issues concerning the role of religion in public discourse. In my response to Erik A. Anderson, I go beyond what I (...)
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  47. Anita Konzelmann Ziv, Knowledge, Emotion, Value and Inner Normativity: KEVIN Probes Collective Persons. Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Kevin Mulligan.score: 18.0
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  48. Ronald Laymon (1987). Using Scott Domains to Explicate the Notions of Approximate and Idealized Data. Philosophy of Science 54 (2):194-221.score: 18.0
    This paper utilizes Scott domains (continuous lattices) to provide a mathematical model for the use of idealized and approximately true data in the testing of scientific theories. Key episodes from the history of science can be understood in terms of this model as attempts to demonstrate that theories are monotonic, that is, yield better predictions when fed better or more realistic data. However, as we show, monotonicity and truth of theories are independent notions. A formal description is given of (...)
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  49. Kevin Kelly, Kevin Kelly, Oliver Schulte, Vincent Hendricks.score: 18.0
    Philosophical logicians proposing theories of rational belief revision have had little to say about whether their proposals assist or impede the agent's ability to reliably arrive at the truth as his beliefs change through time. On the other hand, reliability is the central concern of formal learning theory. In this paper we investigate the belief revision theory of Alchourron, Gardenfors and Makinson from a learning theoretic point of view.
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  50. Masanao Ozawa (1995). Scott Incomplete Boolean Ultrapowers of the Real Line. Journal of Symbolic Logic 60 (1):160-171.score: 18.0
    An ordered field is said to be Scott complete iff it is complete with respect to its uniform structure. Zakon has asked whether nonstandard real lines are Scott complete. We prove in ZFC that for any complete Boolean algebra B which is not (ω, 2)-distributive there is an ultrafilter U of B such that the Boolean ultrapower of the real line modulo U is not Scott complete. We also show how forcing in set theory gives rise to (...)
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