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Profile: Keya Maitra (University of North Carolina, Asheville)
  1. Keya Maitra (2013). The Questions of Identity and Agency in Feminism Without Borders: A Mindful Response. Hypatia 28 (2):360-376.
    Chandra Mohanty, in introducing the phrase “feminism without borders,” acknowledges that she is influenced by the image of “doctors without borders” and wants to highlight the multiplicity of voices and viewpoints within the feminist coalition. So the question of agency assumes primary significance here. But answering the question of agency becomes harder once we try to accommodate this multiplicity. Take, for example, the practice of veiling among certain Muslim women. As many third-world feminists have pointed out, although veiling can't simply (...)
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  2. Keya Maitra (2012). Ambedkar and the Constitution of India: A Deweyan Experiment. Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (2):301-320.
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  3. Keya Maitra (2006). Comparing the Bhagavad-Gita and Kant. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (1):63-67.
    This paper examines the often-mentioned similarity in comparative moral philosophy between the Hindu Text Bhagavad-Gita’s notion of duty and Kant’s notion of duty. It is commonly argued that they are similar in their deontological nature where one is asked to perform one’s duty for the sake of duty only. I consider three related questions from Gita’s and Kant’s perspectives. First, What is the source of our duties: Self or Nature; second, How do we know that an act x is our (...)
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  4. Keya Maitra (2005). Self-Knowledge: Privileged in Access or Privileged in Authority? Southwest Philosophy Review 21 (2):101-114.
  5. Keya Maitra (2002). Leibniz's Account of Error. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (1):63 – 73.
    In the Discourse on Metaphysics Leibniz writes, 'Our perceptions are always true, it is our judgments that come from ourselves that deceive us' (section 14). Leroy Loemker in his 'Leibniz's Doctrine of Ideas' criticizes this account of error. His main worry can be presented in the form of the following syllogistic argument, which he derives from Leibniz's doctrine of ideas: (a) There cannot be a false perception; (b) All judgments are perceptions; and therefore (c) There cannot be a false judgment. (...)
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  6. Keya Maitra (2001). An Understanding of the Concept of "Indian Culture": A Naturalist Alternative. Asian Philosophy 11 (1):15 – 22.
    A recent trend in curriculum reform argues that a successful liberal education curriculum must incorporate courses on multiculturalism. Though there is some agreement on what topics to cover in those courses, very little attention has so far been directed to the issue of how those courses must be designed. What is important in addressing this 'how' question is a clear understanding of the concepts involved. The question I explore in this paper is: what is the best way of understanding the (...)
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  7. Keya Maitra (2000). Explanation and Understanding in the Human Sciences. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (4):130-132.
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