13 found
Sort by:
  1. Kim-Chong Chong (2011). The Concept of Zhen 真 in the Zhuangzi. Philosophy East and West 61 (2):324-346.
    The term zhen 真 in the Zhuangzi 莊子 is commonly associated with the zhen ren 真人 or "true person." We find metaphorical descriptions such as that he can go through fire and water unharmed. On the other hand, some scholars would claim that there is a more mystical element to the Zhuangzi that is missed if we think that such descriptions are "merely" metaphorical. However, the term zhen is not only applied to the zhen ren, and this essay has the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kim-chong Chong (2009). Behuniak Jr., James, Mencius on Becoming Human. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):337-340.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Chung-Ying Cheng, Roger T. Ames, Vincent Shen, Kim-Chong Chong, Paul R. Goldin, Karyn L. Lai & Tan Mingran (2008). Philosophy of Xunzi and Antonio S. Cua. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kim-Chong Chong (2008). Classical Confucianism (Ii) : Meng Zi and Xun Zi. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kim-chong Chong (2008). Xunzi and the Essentialist Mode of Thinking on Human Nature. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):63–78.
  6. Kim-Chong Chong (2006). Zhuangzi and the Nature of Metaphor. Philosophy East and West 56 (3):370 - 391.
    While it is well known that Zhuangzi uses metaphor extensively, there is much less appreciation of the role that it plays in his thought-a topic that is investigated in this essay. At the same time, this investigation is closely concerned with questions about the nature of metaphor. Comparisons are made between a central metaphorical structure in the Zhuangzi on the one hand and contemporary views of the nature of metaphor by Donald Davidson and by Lakoff and Johnson on the other. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. E. Christian Brugger, Stella Chen, Carrie E. Reed, Cao Yuqing, Kim-Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (2004). Raymond Aron, The Dawn of Universal History. New York: Basic Books, 2003, 518 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-465-00408-3, $22.00 (Pb). Linda A. Bell, Beyond the Margins: Reflections of a Feminist Philosopher. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2003, 245 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-7914-5904-7, $17.95 (Pb). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38:433-435.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kim-Chong Chong (2003). Autonomy in the Analects. In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court.
  9. Kim-Chong Chong (2003). Xunzi's Systematic Critique of Mencius. Philosophy East and West 53 (2):215 - 233.
    Some commentators hold that Xunzi's criticism of Mencius' thesis that human nature is good depends more on Xunzi's definition of xing or nature than on substantive argument. Some also claim that Xunzi is committed to accepting Mencius' thesis. A more precise account of Xunzi's critique is offered here, based on an elaboration of his distinction in the "Xing e pian" between ke yi (capacity) and neng (ability). Others have noted this distinction, but no one has sufficiently appreciated its role in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kim-Chong Chong (1999). The Practice of Jen. Philosophy East and West 49 (3):298-316.
    Under Mencius' influence jen has been regarded as part of a theory of nature. As such, commentators have had difficulty resolving the apparent paradox in "Analects" 9.1 that Confucius rarely talked about jen. No paradox arises if jen is seen as a practice involving self-cultivation as a never-ending task and the immediacy of ethical commitment where a cluster of emotions, attitudes, and values are expressed. Jen is an ethical orientation from which one speaks and acts--not particular qualities that one might (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kim-Chong Chong (1996). Zorba: Justifying Ethical Egoism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (1-2):325-328.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Kim-Chong Chong (1989). Altruism and the Avoidance of Solipsism. Philosophical Inquiry 11 (3-4):18-26.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kim-Chong Chong (1984). Egoism, Desires, and Friendship. American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (4):349 - 357.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation