46 found
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  1.  19
    Kimberly Hutchings (2003). Hegel and Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    Hegel and Feminist Philosophy traces the legacy of Hegel in the work of thinkers such as de Beauvoir, Irigaray and Butler, and also in contemporary debates in ...
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  2.  6
    Kimberly Hutchings (2014). Thinking Ethically About the Global in 'Global Ethics'. Journal of Global Ethics 10 (1):26-29.
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  3. Kimberly Hutchings (2010). Global Ethics: An Introduction. Polity.
    The field of global ethics draws on traditions of moral theory, mostly derived from western philosophy, in order to address moral problems specific to an increasingly globalised world. This book provides an accessible introduction to the field of global ethics for students of politics, international relations and globalisation. It offers an overview and assessment of key perspectives in global ethics and their implications for substantive moral issues in global politics. These issues include the morality of state and non-state violence, the (...)
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  4.  62
    Elizabeth Frazer & Kimberly Hutchings (2008). On Politics and Violence: Arendt Contra Fanon. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (1):90-108.
    This paper considers the implications of Hannah Arendt's criticisms of Frantz Fanon and the theories of violence and politics associated with his influence for our understanding of the relationship between those two phenomena. Fanon argues that violence is a means necessary to political action, and also is an organic force or energy. Arendt argues that violence is inherently unpredictable, which means that end reasoning is in any case anti-political, and that it is a profound error to naturalize violence. We evaluate (...)
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  5. Christine Battersby & Kimberly Hutchings (2008). The Sublime, Terror and Human Difference. Radical Philosophy 148:43.
    Christine Battersby is a leading thinker in the field of philosophy, gender studies and visual and literary aesthetics. In this important new work, she undertakes an exploration of the nature of the sublime, one of the most important topics in contemporary debates about modernity, politics and art. Through a compelling examination of terror, transcendence and the ‘other’ in key European philosophers and writers, Battersby articulates a radical ‘female sublime’. A central feature of The Sublime, Terror and Human Difference is its (...)
     
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  6. Kimberly Hutchings (1999). International Political Theory: Rethinking Ethics in a Global Era. Sage Publications.
    This book provides an invaluable overview of the competing schools of thought in traditional and contemporary normative international theory and seeks to provide a new basis for doing international political theory and thinking about ethics in world politics today. · Part one explains the role and place of normative theory in the study of international politics before critically examining mainstream approaches in international relations and applied ethics. Here the student is introduced to the central debates between realists and idealists, and (...)
     
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  7. Kimberly Hutchings (2008). Time and World Politics: Thinking the Present. Manchester University Press.
  8. Kimberly Hutchings (2010). Global Ethics: An Introduction. Polity.
    The field of global ethics draws on traditions of moral theory, mostly derived from western philosophy, in order to address moral problems specific to an increasingly globalised world. This book provides an accessible introduction to the field of global ethics for students of politics, international relations and globalisation. It offers an overview and assessment of key perspectives in global ethics and their implications for substantive moral issues in global politics. These issues include the morality of state and non-state violence, the (...)
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  9.  21
    Kimberly Hutchings (1995). Kant, Critique, and Politics. Routledge.
    The use and abuse and critique of Kant has generated a huge literature among contemporary political theorists; his work has been surreptitiously kept by some critics of the Enlightenment to exeplify starndards of modernity. Kimberly Hutchings reevaluates Kant's work in terms of its significance in the writings of Habersmas, Arendt, Lyotard and Foucault. This is not an exercise in the history of ideas; through her extremely lucid presentation of Kant's critical philosophy, Hutchings reveals the critique to be a complex, ambiguous (...)
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  10.  61
    Kimberly Hutchings (2007). Simone de Beauvoir and the Ambiguous Ethics of Political Violence. Hypatia 22 (3):111-132.
    : In this essay, Hutchings contends that Simone de Beauvoir's argument in The Ethics of Ambiguity provides a valuable resource for feminists currently addressing the question of the legitimacy of political violence, whether of the state or otherwise. The reason is not that Beauvoir provides a definitive answer to this question, but rather because of the ways in which she deconstructs it. In enabling her reader to appreciate what is presupposed by a resistant politics that adopts violence as its instrument, (...)
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  11.  7
    Elizabeth Frazer & Kimberly Hutchings (forthcoming). Anarchist Ambivalence: Politics and Violence in the Thought of Bakunin, Tolstoy and Kropotkin. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116634087.
    There appear to be striking contradictions between different strands of anarchist thought with respect to violence – anarchism can justify it, or condemn it, can be associated with both violent action and pacifism. The anarchist thinkers studied here saw themselves as facing up to the realities of violence in politics – the violence of state power, and the destructiveness of instrumental uses of physical power as a revolutionary political weapon. Bakunin, Tolstoy and Kropotkin all express ambivalence about violence in relation (...)
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  12.  6
    Gary Browning, Kimberly Hutchings & Raia Prokhovnik (2002). Editorial. Contemporary Political Theory 1 (1):1-2.
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  13.  10
    Elizabeth Frazer & Kimberly Hutchings (2007). Argument and Rhetoric in the Justification of Political Violence. European Journal of Political Theory 6 (2):180-199.
    In contrast to liberal, Christian and other pacifist ethics and to just war theory, a range of 20th-century thinkers sought to normalize the role of violence in politics. This article examines the justificatory strategies of Weber, Sorel, Schmitt, Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty and Fanon. They each engage in justificatory argument, deploying arguments for violence from instrumentality, from necessity and from virtue. All of these arguments raise problems of validity. However, we find that they are reinforced by the representation of violence in terms (...)
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  14.  15
    Kimberly Hutchings (2009). 6 Simone de Beauvoir. In Jenny Edkins & Nick Vaughan-Williams (eds.), Critical Theorists and International Relations. Routledge 66.
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  15. Kimberly Hutchings (2009). 20 Immanuel Kant. In Jenny Edkins & Nick Vaughan-Williams (eds.), Critical Theorists and International Relations. Routledge 217.
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  16.  20
    Elizabeth Frazer & Kimberly Hutchings (2009). Politics, Violence and Revolutionary Virtue: Reflections On Locke and Sorel. Thesis Eleven 97 (1):46-63.
    John Locke (1632—1704) and Georges Sorel (1859—1922) are commonly understood as representing opposed positions vis-a-vis revolution — with Locke representing the liberal distinction between violence and politics versus Sorel's rejection of politics in its pacified liberal sense. This interpretation is shown by a close reading of their works to be misleading. Both draw a necessary link between revolution and violence, and both mediate this link through the concept of `war'. They both depoliticize revolution, as for both of them `war' is (...)
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  17.  10
    Kimberly Hutchings (2002). Retrieving Experience: Subjectivity and Recognition in Feminist Politics. Contemporary Political Theory 1 (2):250.
  18.  9
    Liu Xun, He Gaochao, Carine Defoort, Kimberly Hutchings, Liu Xin & Nick Rengger (2003). Rediscovering Republicanism in China. Contemporary Chinese Thought 34 (3):18-34.
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  19.  4
    Kimberly Hutchings (2007). Simone de Beauvoir and the Ambiguous Ethics of Political Violence. Hypatia 22 (3):111-132.
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  20.  9
    Kimberly Hutchings (2000). The Question of Self‐Determination and its Implications for Normative International Theory. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (1):91-120.
  21.  7
    Kimberly Hutchings, Jens Bartelson, Edward Keene, Lea Ypi, Helen M. Kinsella & David Armitage (2014). Foundations of Modern International Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (4):387-418.
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  22.  4
    Kimberly Hutchings (2000). Antigone: Towards a Hegelian Feminist Philosophy. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 41:120-131.
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  23.  6
    Kimberly Hutchings (2010). Badiou, Balibar and Rancière – Re-Thinking Emancipation. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (4):508-510.
  24.  6
    Kimberly Hutchings (1994). The Fate of Art. Aesthetic Alienation From Kant to Derrida and Adorno. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 35 (1):68-70.
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  25.  14
    Kimberly Hutchings (2011). What is Orientation in Thinking? On the Question of Time and Timeliness in Cosmopolitical Thought. Constellations 18 (2):190-204.
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  26.  5
    Kimberly Hutchings (2009). Moral Images of Freedom: A Future for Critical Theory. By Drucilla Cornell. Hypatia 24 (2):208-211.
  27.  4
    Kimberly Hutchings (2006). Men in Political Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):350.
  28.  12
    Kimberly Hutchings (2006). Human Rights and Gender Violence: Translating International Law Into Local Justice - by Sally Engle Merry. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (3):390–391.
  29.  2
    Kimberly Hutchings (2001). De Beauvoir's Hegelianism: Rethinking the Second Sex. Radical Philosophy 107:21-31.
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  30.  2
    Gary Browning, Kimberly Hutchings & Raia Prokhovnik (2003). Editorial Note. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (3):263-263.
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  31.  2
    Kimberly Hutchings (2002). Love and Politics: Women Politicians and the Ethics of Care. [REVIEW] Contemporary Political Theory 1 (2):250-253.
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  32.  3
    Kimberly Hutchings (2009). Good Fathers and Rebellious Daughters: Reading Women in Benhabib's International Political Theory. Journal of International Political Theory 5 (2):113-124.
    The paper traces the role of ‘women’ in Seyla Benhabib's work. It argues that this tracing helps to make clear the way that Benhabib's latest work relies on assuming distinctive political temporalities between the international and the domestic spheres. The international is characterised by an unlocatable linear temporality of moral learning that draws on Habermas's reading of Kant's philosophy of history. In contrast, in the domestic, cosmopolitan temporality enters into a dialectical relation with an Arendtian, republican temporality that is open (...)
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  33.  1
    Kimberly Hutchings (2007). Simone de Beauvoir and the Ambiguous Ethics of Political Violence. Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (3):111-132.
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  34.  7
    Alison Stone, N. Bauer, Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen, Hegel and Feminist Politics : A Symposium.
  35.  1
    Kimberly Hutchings (2002). Feminist International Relations: An Unfinished Journey, Christine Sylvester , 350 Pp., $65 Cloth, $25 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):171-173.
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  36. Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.) (2010). Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  37. Kimberly Hutchings (2006). Human Rights and Gender Violence: Translating International Law Into Local Justice, Sally Engle Merry (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005), 264 Pp., $20 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 20 (3):390-391.
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  38. Kimberly Hutchings (2006). Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment; Kantʼs Politics: Provisional Theory in an Uncertain World; The Kantian Imperative: Humiliation, Common Sense, Politics. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 140.
  39. Kimberly Hutchings (2013). Kant, Critique and Politics. Routledge.
    Why does the ghost of Kant continue to haunt contemporary critical theory? _Kant, Critique and Politics_ examines the influence of Kantian critique on the work of such major and diverse theorists as Habermas, Arendt, Foucault and Lyotard. It offers an entirely new reading of Kant, challenging the orthodox distinctions between modernist and postmodernist theorizing, by illuminating how Kant's influence continues to structure critical debate. This is the first book to offer both a systematic reading of Kant and to contextualise his (...)
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  40. Kimberly Hutchings (1995). Kant, Critique and Politics. Routledge.
    Why does the ghost of Kant continue to haunt contemporary critical theory? _Kant, Critique and Politics_ examines the influence of Kantian critique on the work of such major and diverse theorists as Habermas, Arendt, Foucault and Lyotard. It offers an entirely new reading of Kant, challenging the orthodox distinctions between modernist and postmodernist theorizing, by illuminating how Kant's influence continues to structure critical debate. This is the first book to offer both a systematic reading of Kant and to contextualise his (...)
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  41. Kimberly Hutchings (2010). Knowing Thyself: Hegel, Feminism and an Ethics of Heteronomy. In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave Macmillan
  42. Kimberly Hutchings (2006). Men in Political Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):350-351.
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  43. Kimberly Hutchings (2002). Retrieving Experience: Subjectivity and Recognition in Feminist Politics. Contemporary Political Theory 1 (2):250-253.
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  44. Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (2010). Reading Hegel. In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  45. Kimberly Hutchings & Miri Rozmarin (1996). Women in Philosophy in Britain: The Good News and the Bad; Feminist Philosophy in Israel. Radical Philosophy 80.
  46. Kimberly Hutchings (1998). Women Philosophers and the RAE. Radical Philosophy 88.