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  1. Kimerer L. LaMothe (2007). Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman (Review). Hypatia 22 (3):194-197.
    Although Nietzsche has been considered by some critics to be a misogynist for his treatment of woman, women, and the feminine, Frances Nesbitt Oppel offers a radical reinterpretation of the philosopher's ideas on sex, gender, and sexuality. In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues that a closer reading of Nietzsche's texts and rhetorical style (especially his use of metaphor and irony), as well as his letters and notes, shows that he was strategically and deliberately dismantling dualistic thinking (...)
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  2. Kimerer L. Lamothe (2005). Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference: Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Hypatia 20 (1):120 - 149.
    Reading Hegel's 1827 Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion alongside his Phenomenology of Spirit, I argue that his vision for becoming a self-conscious subject-or seeing (oneself as) "spirit"-requires taking responsibility for the insight that every act of reason expresses an experience of sexual difference. It entails working to bring into being communities whose conceptions of gender and the absolute realize this idea.
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    Kimerer L. LaMothe (2005). Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference: Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's. Hypatia 20 (1).
    : Reading Hegel's 1827 Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion alongside his Phenomenology of Spirit, I argue that his vision for becoming a self-conscious subject—or seeing (oneself as) "spirit"—requires taking responsibility for the insight that every act of reason expresses an experience of sexual difference. It entails working to bring into being communities whose conceptions of gender and the absolute realize this idea.
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    Kimerer L. Lamothe (2005). Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference: Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 20 (1):120-149.
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    Kimerer L. LaMothe (2007). Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman by Frances Nesbitt Oppel. Hypatia 22 (3):194-197.
  6.  13
    Kimerer L. LaMothe (2004). Between Dancing and Writing: The Practice of Religious Studies. Fordham University Press.
    This book provides philosophical grounds for an emerging area of scholarship: the study of religion and dance. In the first part, LaMothe investigates why scholars in religious studies have tended to overlook dance, or rhythmic bodily movement, in favor of textual expressions of religious life. In close readings of Descartes, Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, and Kierkegaard, LaMothe traces this attitude to formative moments of the field in which philosophers relied upon the practice of writing to mediate between the study of “religion,” (...)
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  7. Kimerer L. LaMothe (2007). Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman by Frances Nesbitt Oppel. Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (3):194-197.
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  8. Kimerer L. LaMothe (2015). Why We Dance: A Philosophy of Bodily Becoming. Cup.
    Within intellectual paradigms that privilege mind over matter, dance has long appeared as a marginal, derivative, or primitive art. Drawing support from theorists and artists who embrace matter as dynamic and agential, this book offers a visionary definition of dance that illuminates its constitutive work in the ongoing evolution of human persons. _Why We Dance _introduces a philosophy of bodily becoming that posits bodily movement as the source and telos of human life. Within this philosophy, dance appears as an activity (...)
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