7 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Kirk R. Sanders [7]Kirk Regan Sanders [1]
  1.  26
    Jeffrey Fish & Kirk R. Sanders (eds.) (2011). Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Cambridge University Press.
    Epicureanism after the generation of its founders has been characterised as dogmatic, uncreative and static. But this volume brings together work from leading classicists and philosophers that demonstrates the persistent interplay in the school between historical and contemporary influences from outside the school and a commitment to the founders' authority. The interplay begins with Epicurus himself, who made arresting claims of intellectual independence, yet also admitted to taking over important ideas from predecessors, and displayed more receptivity than is usually thought (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  13
    Kirk R. Sanders (2008). Mens and Emotion: De Rerum Natura 3.136–46. Classical Quarterly 58 (01):362-366.
  3.  13
    Kirk R. Sanders (2009). On a Causal Notion in Philodemus' on Anger. Classical Quarterly 59 (02):642-647.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  11
    Kirk R. Sanders (2006). Sedley (D.) (Ed.) The Cambridge Companion to Greek and Roman Philosophy . Pp. Xvi + 396, Map, Ills. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Paper, £17.95 (Cased, £47.50). ISBN: 0-521-77503-5 (0-521-77285-0 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):47-.
  5.  1
    Kirk R. Sanders (2011). Philodemus and the Fear of Premature Death. In Jeffrey Fish & Kirk R. Sanders (eds.), Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Cambridge University Press 211-234.
  6. Jeffrey Fish & Kirk R. Sanders (eds.) (2015). Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Cambridge University Press.
    Epicureanism after the generation of its founders has been characterised as dogmatic, uncreative and static. But this volume brings together work from leading classicists and philosophers that demonstrates the persistent interplay in the school between historical and contemporary influences from outside the school and a commitment to the founders' authority. The interplay begins with Epicurus himself, who made arresting claims of intellectual independence, yet also admitted to taking over important ideas from predecessors, and displayed more receptivity than is usually thought (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Kirk R. Sanders (2008). Lysias Or. 1: Two Critical Notes. Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 152 (1/2008).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography