5 found
Sort by:
  1. Kirsten E. Martin (2012). Diminished or Just Different? A Factorial Vignette Study of Privacy as a Social Contract. Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):519-539.
    A growing body of theory has focused on privacy as being contextually defined, where individuals have highly particularized judgments about the appropriateness of what, why, how, and to whom information flows within a specific context. Such a social contract understanding of privacy could produce more practical guidance for organizations and managers who have employees, users, and future customers all with possibly different conceptions of privacy across contexts. However, this theoretical suggestion, while intuitively appealing, has not been empirically examined. This study (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kirsten E. Martin (2011). TMI (Too Much Information). Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (1-2):1-32.
    Organizations have a vested interest in customers, employees, and users to disclose information within existing expectations of privacy. This empirical examination uses theoretical sampling and experimental design to identify the factors individuals consider when disclosing information within privacy expectations. The findings from a factorial vignette survey are theoretically generalizable and show that an individual’s relationship to the recipient (familiarity) and the degree to which the information is protected from being easily transferred to others (friction) positively influence the odds that disclosure (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kirsten E. Martin (2008). Internet Technologies in China: Insights on the Morally Important Influence of Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):489 - 501.
    Within Science and Technology Studies, much work has been accomplished to identify the moral importance of technology in order to clarify the influence of scientists, technologists, and managers. However, similar studies within business ethics have not kept pace with the nuanced and contextualized study of technology within Science and Technology Studies. In this article, I analyze current arguments within business ethics as limiting both the moral importance of technology and the influence of managers. As I argue, such assumptions serve to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kirsten E. Martin & R. Edward Freeman (2004). The Separation of Technology and Ethics in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):353-364.
    The purpose of this paper is to draw out and make explicit the assumptions made in the treatment of technology within business ethics. Drawing on the work of Freeman (1994, 2000) on the assumed separation between business and ethics, we propose a similar separation exists in the current analysis of technology and ethics. After first identifying and describing the separation thesis assumed in the analysis of technology, we will explore how this assumption manifests itself in the current literature. A different (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kirsten E. Martin & R. Edward Freeman (2003). Some Problems with Employee Monitoring. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):353 - 361.
    Employee monitoring has raised concerns from all areas of society - business organizations, employee interest groups, privacy advocates, civil libertarians, lawyers, professional ethicists, and every combination possible. Each advocate has its own rationale for or against employee monitoring whether it be economic, legal, or ethical. However, no matter what the form of reasoning, seven key arguments emerge from the pool of analysis. These arguments have been used equally from all sides of the debate. The purpose of this paper is to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation