Search results for 'Kirsten Foss' (try it on Scholar)

412 found
Sort by:
  1. Kirsten Foss & Nicolai J. Foss (2000). Theoretical Isolation in Contract Theory: Suppressing Margins and Entrepreneurship. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (3):313-339.score: 300.0
    We discuss contract theory from a combined Austrian/new institutional view. In the latter view, the world is seen as shot through with ignorance and transaction costs, but, as a tendency, entrepreneurial activity responds to the problems caused by these. All modelling must critically reflect this. This ontological commitment is contrasted to various isolations characteristic of contract theory, specifically the modelling strategy of introducing often ad hoc and unexplained constraints that suppress margins and possibilities of entrepreneurial actions that would be open (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kirsten Foss & Nicolai J. Foss (forthcoming). Authority in the Context of Distributed Knowledge. Common Knowledge.score: 300.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jeff Foss (1991). On Saving the Phenomena and the Mice: A Reply to Bourgeois Concerning Van Fraassen's Image of Science. Philosophy of Science 58 (2):278-287.score: 60.0
    In the fusillade he lets fly against Foss (1984), Bourgeois (1987) sometimes hits a live target. I admit that I went beyond the letter of van Fraassen's The Scientific Image (1980), making inferences and drawing conclusions which are often absurd. I maintain, however, that the absurdities must be charged to van Fraassen's account. While I cannot redress every errant shot of Bourgeois, his essay reveals the need for further discussion of the concepts of the phenomena and the observables as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jeffrey Foss (ed.) (2013). Science and the World: Philosophical Approaches. Broadview Press.score: 60.0
    This new anthology includes both classic and contemporary readings on the methods and scope of science. Jeffrey Foss depicts science in a broadly humanistic context, contending that it is philosophically interesting because it has reshaped nearly all aspects of human culture—and in so doing has reshaped humanity as well. While providing a strong introduction to epistemological and metaphysical issues in science, this text goes beyond the traditional topics, enlarging the scope of philosophical engagement with science. Substantial introductions and critical (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jeffrey E. Foss (1993). Subjectivity, Objectivity, and Nagel on Consciousness. Dialogue 32 (4):725-36.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jeffrey E. Foss (1989). On the Logic of What It is Like to Be a Conscious Subject. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (June):305-320.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey E. Foss (2008). Beyond Environmentalism: A Philosophy of Nature. Wiley.score: 30.0
    Beyond Environmentalism is the first book of its kind to present a timely and relevant analysis of environmentalism.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jeffrey E. Foss (2000). Science and the Riddle of Consciousness: A Solution. Springer Netherlands.score: 30.0
    The questions examined in the book speak directly to neuroscientists, computer scientists, psychologists, and philosophers.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jeffrey E. Foss (1995). Materialism, Reduction, Replacement, and the Place of Consciousness in Science. Journal of Philosophy 92 (8):401-29.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jeffrey E. Foss (1992). Introduction to the Epistemology of the Brain: Indeterminacy, Micro-Specificity, Chaos, and Openness. Topoi 11 (1):45-57.score: 30.0
    Given that the mind is the brain, as materialists insist, those who would understand the mind must understand the brain. Assuming that arrays of neural firing frequencies are highly salient aspects of brain information processing (the vector functional account), four hurdles to an understanding of the brain are identified and inspected: indeterminacy, micro-specificity, chaos, and openness.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jeff Foss (1984). On Accepting Van Fraassen's Image of Science. Philosophy of Science 51 (1):79-92.score: 30.0
    In his book, The Scientific Image, van Fraassen lucidly draws an alternative to scientific realism, which he calls "Constructive Empiricism". In this epistemological theory, the concept of observability plays the pivotal role: acceptable theories may be believed only where what they say solely concerns observables. Van Fraassen develops a concept of observability which is, as he admits, vague, relative, science-dependent, and anthropocentric. I draw out unacceptable consequences of each of these aspects of his concept. Also, I argue against his assumption (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jeff Foss (2009). The Scientific Explanation of Colour Qualia. Dialogue 48 (03):479-.score: 30.0
    ABSTRACT: Qualia, the subjectively known qualities of conscious experience, are judged by many philosophers and scientists to lie beyond the domain of scientific explanation, thus making the conscious mind partly incomprehensible to the objective physical sciences. Some, like Kripke and Chalmers, employ modal logic to argue that explanations of qualia are impossible in principle. I argue that there already exist perfectly normal scientific explanations of qualia, and rebut the arguments of those who deny this possibility.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jeffrey E. Foss (1997). How Many Beliefs Can Dance in the Head of the Self-Deceived? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):111-112.score: 30.0
    Mele desires to believe that the self-deceived have consistent beliefs. Beliefs are not observable, but are instead ascribed within an explanatory framework. Because explanatory cogency is the only criterion for belief attribution, Mele should carefully attend to the logic of belief-desire explanation. He does not, and the consistency of his own account as well as that of the self-deceived, are the victims.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jeffrey E. Foss (1994). On the Evolution of Intentionality as Seen From the Intentional Stance. Inquiry 37 (3):287-310.score: 30.0
    Like everyone with a scientific bent of mind, Dennett thinks our capacity for meaningful language and states of mind is the product of evolution (Dennett [1987, ch. VIII]). But unlike many of this bent, he sees virtue in viewing evolution itself from the intentional stance. From this stance, ?Mother Nature?, or the process of evolution by natural selection, bestows intentionality upon us, hence we are not Unmeant Meaners. Thus, our intentionality is extrinsic, and Dennett dismisses the theories of meaning of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jeffrey E. Foss (1996). Is There a Natural Sexual Inequality of Intellect? A Reply to Kimura. Hypatia 11 (3):24 - 46.score: 30.0
    The noted psychologist, Doreen Kimura, has argued that we should not expect to find equal numbers of men and women in various professions because there is a natural sexual inequality of intellect. In rebuttal I argue that each of these mutually supporting theses is insufficiently supported by the evidence to be accepted. The social and ethical dimensions of Kimura's work, and of the scientific study of the nature-nurture controversy in general, are briefly discussed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Laurence Foss (1971). Art as Cognitive: Beyond Scientific Realism. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):234-250.score: 30.0
    Thesis: Art like science radically affects our perceiving and thinking, and the two are substantially alike in that together--along with an inherited "natural" language system with which they overlap--they enable us to articulate the world. Science has been advanced as the measure of all things: scientific realism. By implication, art pertains to beauty, science truth. Science effects conceptual break-throughs, changes our models of natural order. On the contrary (I argue), as a nonverbal symbol system art similarly affects paradigm-induced expectations. Substantively (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jeffrey E. Foss (1987). Is the Mind-Body Problem Empirical? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (September):505-32.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jeffrey E. Foss (1988). The Percept and Vector Function Theories of the Brain. Philosophy of Science 55 (December):511-537.score: 30.0
    Physicalism is an empirical theory of the mind and its place in nature. So the physicalist must show that current neuroscience does not falsify physicalism, but instead supports it. Current neuroscience shows that a nervous system is what I call a vector function system. I provide a brief outline of the resources that empirical research has made available within the constraints of the vector function approach. Then I argue that these resources are sufficient, indeed apt, for the physicalist enterprise, by (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Laurence Foss (1989). The Challenge to Biomedicine: A Foundations Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (2):165-191.score: 30.0
    The basic premise of today's scientific medicine is that the ‘book of man’ is written in the language of the biological sciences, ultimately molecular genetics and biochemistry. The patient is a complex biological organism and disease is a deviation from the norm of somatic parameters. At the same time, many major contemporary diseases are reported to have psychosocial and environmental components in their etiology. Hence the challenge: how can a medical model be both scientific and conceptually well-suited to today's disease (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lawrence Foss (1967). Modern Geometries and the “Transcendental Aesthetic”. Philosophia Mathematica (1-2):35-45.score: 30.0
  21. Jeffrey Foss (2006). The Rituals of Explanation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):618-619.score: 30.0
    Boyer & Lienard's (B&L's) explanation of ritualized behavior is plausible because it fits so well with elementary facts about evolution of plasticity in our behavioral repertoire. Its scope, however, may be broader than its authors explicitly admit. Science itself may be illuminated as ritual behavior. Science, like other rituals, can sustain both healthy and pathological forms. (Published Online February 8 2007).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Vincent Colapietro, Ian M. Crystal, Gunnar Foss & Eivind Kasa (2003). Alston, William P., Editor. Realism & Antirealism. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002. Pp. Viii+ 303. Paper, $22.50. Aportone, Anselmo, Francesco Aronadio, and Paolo Spinicci. Il Problema Dell'intuizione: Tre Studi Su Platone, Kant, E Husserl. Naples: Bibliopolis, 2002. Pp. 196. Paper,€ 20.00. Arrington, Robert L., Editor. The World's Great Philosophers. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2003. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3).score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Laurence Foss (1973). Does Don Juan Really Fly? Philosophy of Science 40 (2):298-316.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jeff Foss (2007). Only Three Dimensions and the Mother of Invention. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):370-370.score: 30.0
    Although the first three dimensions of evolution outlined by Jablonka & Lamb (J&L) are persuasively presented as aspects of evolutionary science, the fourth dimension, symbolic evolution, is problematic: Though it may in some metaphorical sense be happening, there cannot be a science of symbolic evolution. Symbolic evolution essentially involves meaning, which, besides being nonphysical, resolutely resists scientific categorization.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Laurence Foss (1994). Putting the Mind Back Into the Body a Successor Scientific Medical Model. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).score: 30.0
    This paper examines today's received scientific medical model with respect to its ability to satisfy two conditions: (1) its explanatory adequacy relative to the full range of findings in the medical literature, including those indicating a correlation between psychosocial variables and disease susceptibility; and (2) the fit between its physicalist patient and disease concepts and what today's basic sciences, so-called sciences of complexity, tell us about the way matter, notably complex systems (e.g. patients), behave and the nature of scientific explanation. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Laurence Foss (1998). The Biomedical Paradigm and the Nobel Prize: Is It Time for a Change? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (6):621-644.score: 30.0
    An examination of the early history of Nobel Committee deliberations, coupled with a survey of discoveries for which prizes have been awarded to date – and, equally revealing, discoveries for which prizes have not been awarded – reveals a pattern. This pattern suggests that Committee members may have internalized the received, biomedical model and conferred awards in accord with the physicalistic premises that ground this model. I consider the prospect of a paradigm change in medical science and the possible repercussions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Laurence Foss (1968). The Myth of the Given. Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):36 - 57.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jeffrey E. Foss (1980). Rethinking Self-Deception. American Philosophical Quarterly 17 (July):237-242.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Daniel C. Foss (1972). Self and the Revolt Against Method. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 2 (1):291-307.score: 30.0
  30. Luci Paul, Mark A. Foss & Mary Ann Baenninger (1996). Double Standards for Sexual Jealousy. Human Nature 7 (3):291-321.score: 30.0
    This work tests two conflicting views about double standards: whether they reflect evolved sex differences in behavior or a manipulative morality serving male interests. Two questionnaires on jealous reactions to mild (flirting) and serious (cheating) sexual transgressions were randomly assigned to 172 young women and men. One questionnaire assessed standards for appropriate behavior and perceptions of how young women and men usually react. The second asked people to report how they had reacted or, if naive, how they would react. The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Nicolai Foss (2010). Causal and Constitutive Relations, and the Squaring of Coleman's Diagram: Reply to Vromen. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 73 (3):385-391.score: 30.0
    We respond to Jack Vromen’s (this issue) critique of our discussion of the missing micro-foundations of work on routines and capabilities in economics and management research. Contrary to Vromen, we argue that (1) inter-level relations can be causal, and that inter-level causal relations may also obtain between routines and actions and interactions; (2) there are no macro-level causal mechanisms; and (3) on certain readings of the notion of routines and capabilities, these may be macro causes.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jeffrey Foss (2004). Good Science, Bad Philosophy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):791-792.score: 30.0
    Behrendt's & Young's (B&Y's) persuasive scientific theory explains hallucinations, and is supported by a wide variety of psychological evidence, both normal and abnormal – unlike their philosophical thesis, Kantian idealism. I argue that the evidence cited by the authors in support of idealism actually favors realism. Fortunately, their scientific theory is separable from their philosophy, and is methodologically consistent with realism.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jeffrey Foss (2007). Game Theory for Reformation of Behavioral Science Based on a Mistake. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):24-25.score: 30.0
    Gintis assumes the behavioral (=social) sciences are in disarray, and so proposes a theory for their unification. Examination of the unity of the physical sciences reveals he misunderstands the unity of science in general, and so fails to see that the social sciences are already unified with the physical sciences. Another explanation of the differences between them is outlined. (Published Online April 27 2007).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Laurence Foss (1969). 'Language, Logic and Ontology. The Monist 53 (2):293-309.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Laurence Foss (1969). Substance, Knowledge, and Nous in Aristotle. New Scholasticism 43 (3):379-399.score: 30.0
  36. Jerome C. Foss (2012). Why Political Liberalism?: On John Rawls's Political Turn. By Paul Weithman. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (4):746-748.score: 30.0
  37. Laurence Foss (1970). A New Model of the University. Journal of Critical Analysis 1 (4):183-189.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Laurence Foss (1971). After Profits, What? Human Dignity and Technology. World Futures 9 (3):283-300.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jeffrey Foss (1976). A Rule of Minimal Rationality: The Logical Link Between Beliefs and Values. Inquiry 19 (1-4):341 – 353.score: 30.0
    The object of this essay is to demonstrate a logical connection between beliefs and values. It is argued that such a connection can be established only if one keeps in mind the question: What is minimally required in order that it makes sense to speak of beliefs and values at all? Thus, the concept of minimal rationality is indispensable to the task at hand. A particular example of a logical connection between a belief and a value is examined, which leads (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jeffrey E. Foss (1981). C. I. Lewis and Dayton on Pragmatic Contradiction. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 17 (2):153 - 157.score: 30.0
    Dayton's account of lewis' pragmatic contradiction seriously misconstrues this key concept by analyzing it in terms of logical contradiction. this order of analysis is explicitly rejected by lewis as the reverse of the proper order in which the pragmatic concept is foundational to logic and epistemology. i outline a correct account of pragmatic contradiction. then lewis' application of the idea to moral skepticism and the liar paradox is reconsidered, and is seen to vindicate his claim that both skeptic and liar (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Nicolai J. Foss (1997). Ethics, Discovery, and Strategy. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (11):1131-1142.score: 30.0
    I address the issue of justifiable profits from distinct perspectives in economics, strategy research and ethics. Combining insights from Austrian economics, the resource-based perspective, and finders, keepers ethics, I argue that strategy is about the discovery of hitherto unexploited possibilities for exchange. To the extent that strategy is about the discovery/creation ex nihilo of products, ways of producing products, etc., the resulting profits are argued to be justifiable from a finders, keepers perspective.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jeffrey Foss (1996). Masters in Our Own House: A Reply to Brown. Dialogue 35 (01):165-.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jeffrey Foss (1986). Perception and Cognition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):303-322.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Nicolai J. Foss (1998). The New Growth Theory: Some Intellectual Growth Accounting. Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (2):223-246.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses the reasons for the success of the new growth theory. Given that the NGT does not appear to say much new about empirical reality, that its essential ideas have been known for a long time, and that it does not really make contact with a large literature on institutions and economic change, its strong success may arguably be seen as surprising. Or, at least, its success may appear peculiar to Lakatosian methodologists, and others who emphasize notions such (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Laurence Foss (1971). Quine on Translational Indeterminacy. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 12 (2):195-202.score: 30.0
  46. Victor Ehrenberg & E. Kirsten (1958). Die griechische Polis als historisch-geographisches Problem des Mittelmeerraumes. Journal of Hellenic Studies 78:155.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Clive Foss (1988). Anthony Bryer and David Winfield, The Byzantine Monuments and Topography of the Pontos. 2 Vols.(Dumbarton Oaks Studies, 20.) Washington DC: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 1985. 1: Pp. Li, 394; 122 Figures. 2: Pp. Xv; 390 Black-and-White Photographs and Folded Maps in Endpaper Flap. $80. [REVIEW] Speculum 63 (2):377-379.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jeffrey Foss (1986). Abstract Solutions Versus Neurobiologically Plausible Problems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):95-96.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Clive Foss (2008). Helen G. Saradi, The Byzantine City in the Sixth Century: Literary Images and Historical Reality. Athens: Society of Messenian Archaeological Studies, 2006. Paper. Pp. 543; 58 Black-and-White Figures, Plans, and 4 Maps. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (3):746-748.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jeffrey Foss (1992). John D. Greenwood, Ed., The Future of Folk Psychology: Intentionality and Cognitive Science Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (3):162-166.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 412