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Peter Kivy [121]P. Kivy [5]Hagit Kivy [2]Peter Nathan Kivy [1]
  1. Peter Kivy (2002). Introduction to a Philosophy of Music. Clarendon Press.
    Philosophy of music has flourished in the last thirty years, with great advances made in the understanding of the nature of music and its aesthetics. Peter Kivy has been at the center of this flourishing, and now offers his personal introduction to philosophy of music, a clear and lively explanation of how he sees the most important and interesting philosophical issues relating to music. Anyone interested in music will find this a stimulating introduction to some fascinating questions and ideas.
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  2. Peter Kivy (1967). Hume's Standard of Taste: Breaking the Circle. British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (1):57-66.
  3.  46
    Peter Kivy (1990). Music Alone: Philosophical Reflections on the Purely Musical Experience. Cornell University Press.
    In the Essai sur Vorigine des langues (), Jean-Jacques Rousseau reports on an eighteenth-century curiosity that has, from time to time, fascinated musicians ...
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  4. Peter Kivy (2006). The Performance of Reading: An Essay in the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The Performance of Reading_ argues that there are distinct analogies between "silent" reading and artistic performance, and so fashions the new role of the reader as performer. An original and insightful exploration of the act of reading by the leading scholar in the field. Discusses the history of reading and the transitions from reading aloud to reading silently, and the changing role of literature as communal, active experience to a more private endeavor.
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  5. Peter Kivy (1993). Auditor's Emotions: Contention, Concession and Compromise. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (1):1-12.
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  6. Peter Kivy (1979). Aesthetic Concepts: Some Fresh Considerations. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (4):423-432.
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  7.  28
    Peter Kivy (1993). The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music. Cambridge University Press.
    Peter Kivy is the author of many books on the history of art and, in particular, the aesthetics of music. This collection of essays spans a period of some thirty years and focuses on a richly diverse set of issues: the biological origins of music, the role of music in the liberal education, the nature of the musical work and its performance, the aesthetics of opera, the emotions of music, and the very nature of music itself. Some of these subjects (...)
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  8. Peter Kivy (1995). The "Sense" of Beauty and the Sense of "Art": Hutcheson's Place in the History and Practice of Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (4):349-357.
  9.  19
    Peter Kivy (2003). The Seventh Sense: Francis Hutcheson and Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
    Now reissued with substantial new material, The Seventh Sense is the definitive study of the aesthetic theory of the great eighteenth-century philosopher Frances Hutcheson, and its huge influence on British aesthetics. Peter Kivy's book is a seminal work on early modern aesthetics, and has been much in demand since going out of print some years ago; this new edition brings the book up to date with the addition of eight essays that Kivy has written on the subject since 1976.
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  10.  21
    Peter Kivy (1983). Platonism in Music. Grazer Philosophische Studien 19:109-129.
    Various criticisms have been brought against a Platonistic construal of the musical work: that is, against the view that the musical work is a universal or kind or type, of which the performances are instances or tokens. Some of these criticisms are: (1) that musical works possess perceptual properties and universals do not; (2) that musical works are created and universals cannot be; (3) that universals cannot be destroyed and musical works can; (4) that parts of tokens of the same (...)
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  11. Peter Kivy (1999). Feeling the Musical Emotions. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (1):1-13.
  12.  19
    Peter Kivy (1997). Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences. Cambridge University Press.
    Since the beginning of the eighteenth century the philosophy of art has been engaged on the project of trying to find out what the fine arts have in common and, thus, how they might be defined. Peter Kivy's purpose in this accessible and lucid book is to trace the history of that enterprise and argue that the definitional project has been unsuccessful. He offers a fruitful change of strategy: instead of engaging in an obsessive quest for sameness, let us explore (...)
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  13.  2
    Peter Kivy (2011). Antithetical Arts: On the Ancient Quarrel Between Literature and Music. OUP Oxford.
    Peter Kivy presents a fascinating critical examination of the two rival ways of understanding instrumental music. He argues against 'literary' interpretation in terms of representational or narrative content, and defends musical formalism. Along the way he discusses interpretations of a range of works in the canon of absolute music.
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  14. Peter Kivy (2011). Once-Told Tales: An Essay in Literary Aesthetics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Drawing comparisons with other art forms, this book examines the role of aesthetic features in silent reading, such as narrative structure, and the core experience of reading a novel as a story rather than a scholarly exercise. Focuses on the experience of the art form known as the novel Uses the more common perspective of a reader who reads to be told a story, rather than for scholarly or critical analysis Draws comparisons with experience of the other arts, music in (...)
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  15.  44
    Peter Kivy (1995). Authenticities: Philosophical Reflections on Musical Performance. Cornell University Press.
    "In his latest book on the aesthetics of music, Peter Kivy presents an argument not for authenticity but for authenticities of performance, including ...
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  16.  8
    Peter Kivy (1981). The Corded Shell: Reflections on Musical Expression. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (4):460-462.
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  17.  49
    Peter Kivy (2006). Ars Perfecta: Toward Perfection in Musical Performance? British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):111-132.
    Is there such a thing as the perfect performance of a musical work? It is the thesis of this paper that there is not. The thesis is advanced as the implication or concomitant of an already developed view of musical performance in the Western tradition, outlined in my book, Authenticities (1995).
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  18.  58
    Peter Kivy (1987). Platonism in Music: Another Kind of Defense. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (3):245 - 252.
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  19. Peter Kivy (2003). Seventh Sense: Francis Hutchenson and Eighteenth-Century British Aesthetics. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Seventh Sense is the definitive study of the aesthetic theory of the great eighteenth-century philosopher Francis Hutcheson, arguably the founder of the modern discipline of aesthetics, and one of the most important figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. This new edition brings Peter Kivy's seminal work back into print, substantially expanded by the addition of seven essays, which deal primarily with Hutcheson's relation to other thinkers, and his influence on eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century aesthetics.Part I of The Seventh Sense presents (...)
     
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  20.  9
    peter kivy (2007). Moodophilia: A Response to Noël Carroll and Margaret Moore. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (3):323–329.
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  21.  38
    Peter Kivy (2003). Jokes Are a Laughing Matter. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (1):5-15.
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  22.  35
    Peter Kivy (2001). New Essays on Musical Understanding. Clarendon.
    Peter Kivy presents a selection of his new and recent writings on the philosophy of music--an area to which he has been one of the most eminent contributors. In his distinctively elegant and informal style, Kivy explores such topics as musicology and its history, the nature of musical works, and the role of emotion in music, and does so in a way that will attract the interest of philosophical and musical readers alike. Most works are published here for the first (...)
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  23.  3
    Peter Kivy (2008). The Performance of Reading: An Essay in the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The Performance of Reading_ argues that there are distinct analogies between "silent" reading and artistic performance, and so fashions the new role of the reader as performer. An original and insightful exploration of the act of reading by the leading scholar in the field. Discusses the history of reading and the transitions from reading aloud to reading silently, and the changing role of literature as communal, active experience to a more private endeavor.
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  24.  75
    Peter Kivy (1975). What Makes "Aesthetic" Terms Aesthetic? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (2):197-211.
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  25.  99
    Peter Kivy (1995). Stephen Davies: Musical Meaning and Expression. Mind 104 (416):896-900.
  26.  42
    Peter Kivy (2006). Critical Study: Deeper Than Emotion. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):287-311.
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  27.  79
    Peter Kivy (1989). Sound Sentiment: An Essay on the Musical Emotions, Including the Complete Text of the Corded Shell. Temple University Press.
    Incorporating the complete, corrected text of The Corded Shell, Kivy brings his earlier arguments up to date in light of recent work in the field, and discusses ...
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  28.  1
    Peter Kivy (1991). Sound Sentiment: An Essay on the Musical Emotions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):83-85.
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  29.  90
    Peter Kivy (1968). Aesthetic Aspects and Aesthetic Qualities. Journal of Philosophy 65 (4):85-93.
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  30.  1
    Peter Kivy (2003). The Possessor and the Possessed: Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, and the Idea of Musical Genius. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (1):73-74.
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  31.  33
    Peter Kivy (2006). Mood and Music: Some Reflections for Noël Carroll. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (2):271–281.
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  32.  15
    Peter Kivy (1991). Science and Aesthetic Appreciation. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):180-195.
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  33.  19
    Roger Scruton, Peter Kivy, Jerrold Levinson, Malcolm Budd, Diana Raffman & Lydia Goehr (1994). Recent Books in the Philopshy of MusicMusic Alone: Philosophical Reflections on the Purely Musical Experience.Sound and Semblance: Reflections on Musical Representation.The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music.Music, Art and Metaphysics: Essays in Philosophical Aesthetics.Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories.Language, Music and Mind.The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 44 (177):503.
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  34.  16
    Peter Kivy (1978). Thomas Reid and the Expression Theory of Art. The Monist 61 (2):167-183.
    I mean by "the expression theory of art" the theory which holds that the expression of emotion is the essential property of art. I mean by "a theory of artistic expression" any theory which gives an account of how works of art express emotions. My argument is that thomas reid, In contrast to his contemporaries and immediate predecessors, Came very close to holding not merely a theory of artistic expression but the expression theory of art.
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  35.  60
    Peter Kivy (1991). Is Music an Art? Journal of Philosophy 88 (10):544-554.
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  36.  17
    Peter Kivy (1993). Differences. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (2):123-132.
  37.  20
    Peter Kivy (2009). Musical morality. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:397-412.
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  38.  38
    Peter Kivy (1983). Hume's Neighbour's Wife: An Essay on the Evolution of Hume's Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (3):195-208.
  39. Peter Kivy (2002). Introduction to a Philosophy of Music. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Philosophy of music has flourished in the last thirty years, with great advances made in the understanding of the nature of music and its aesthetics. Peter Kivy has been at the centre of this flourishing, and now offers his personal introduction to philosophy of music, a clear and lively explanation of how he sees the most important and interesting philosophical issues relating to music. Anyone interested in music will find this a stimulating introduction to some fascinating questions and ideas.
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  40.  1
    Peter Kivy (1973). Speaking of Art. The Hague,Nijhoff.
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  41.  24
    Peter Kivy (2000). How to Forge a Musical Work. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):233-235.
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  42.  32
    Peter Kivy (1979). Voltaire, Hume, and the Problem of Evil. Philosophy and Literature 3 (2):211-224.
  43.  2
    Peter Kivy (1986). Sound and Semblance: Reflections on Musical Representation. Philosophical Review 95 (2):284-288.
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  44.  45
    Peter Kivy (2009). Fictional Form and Symphonic Structure: An Essay in Comparative Aesthetics. Ratio 22 (4):421-438.
    It is agreed on all hands that both fictional narratives and the familiar genres of classical music possess an inner structure that both can be perceived and be appreciated aesthetically. It is my argument here that this inner structure plays a crucially different role in fictional narrative than it does in classical music, confining myself here to 'absolute music' (which is to say, pure instrumental music without text, programme, dramatic setting, or other 'extra-musical' content). The argument, basically, is that whereas (...)
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  45.  32
    Peter Kivy (2011). Remarks on the Varieties of Prejudice in Hume's Essay on Taste. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):111-114.
    The last of Hume's five requirements of the ‘‘true judge in the finer arts’’, is that he be ‘‘cleared of all prejudice……'. I argue here that, lurking in this innocuous-sounding requirement of the true judge, is a complexity that reveals a significant tension in Hume's argument. It is that tension that I want briefly to explore.
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  46. Peter Kivy (1999). Music in the Movies: A Philosophical Enquiry. In Richard Allen & Murray Smith (eds.), Film Theory and Philosophy. OUP Oxford
     
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  47.  12
    Peter Kivy (1980). Melville's Billy and the Secular Problem of Evil. The Monist 63 (4):480-493.
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  48.  2
    Peter Kivy (1990). Osmin's Rage: Philosophical Reflections on Opera, Drama, and Text. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (2):165-167.
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  49.  20
    Peter Kivy (1990). A New Music Criticism? The Monist 73 (2):247-268.
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  50.  37
    Peter Kivy (2003). Another Go at Musical Profundity: Stephen Davies and the Game of Chess. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):401-411.
    I have argued previously that the art of absolute music, unlike, for example, the art of literature, is not capable of profundity, which I characterized as treating a profound subject matter, at the highest artistic level, in a manner appropriate to its profundity. Stephen Davies has recently argued that there is another way of being profound, which he calls non-propositional profundity, and for which chess provides his principal example. He argues, further, that absolute music also exhibits this non-propositional profundity. I (...)
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