Search results for 'Knowledge, Sociology of' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Loet Leydesdorff (1992). The Knowledge Content of Science and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 23 (2):241-263.score: 705.0
    Several, seemingly unrelated problems of empirical research in the 'sociology of scientific knowledge' can be analyzed as following from initial assumptions with respect to the status of the knowledge content of science. These problems involve: (1) the relation between the level of the scientific field and the group level; (2) the boundaries and the status of 'contexts', and (3) the emergence of so-called 'asymmetry' in discourse analysis. It is suggested that these problems can be clarified by allowing for cognitive (...)
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  2. Markus Seidel (forthcoming). Changing Society by Scientific Investigations? The Unexpected Shared Ground Between Early Sociology of Knowledge and the Vienna Circle. Foundations of Science:1-12.score: 705.0
    In this paper, I show that there are important but hitherto unnoticed similarities between key figures of the Vienna Circle and early defenders of sociology of knowledge. The similarities regard their stance on potential implications of the study of science for political and societal issues. I argue that notably Otto Neurath and Karl Mannheim are concerned with proposing a genuine political philosophy of science that is remarkably different from today’s emerging interest in the relation between science and society in (...)
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  3. E. Doyle McCarthy (1996). Knowledge as Culture: The New Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge.score: 702.0
    Drawing upon Marxist, French structuralist and American pragmatist traditions, this lively and accessible introduction to the sociology of knowledge gives to its classic texts a fresh reading, arguing that various bodies of knowledge operate within culture to create powerful cultural dispositions, meanings, and categories. It looks at the cultural impact of the forms and images of mass media, the authority of science, medicine, and law as bodies of contemporary knowledge and practice. Finally, it considers the concept of "engendered knowledge" (...)
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  4. David Frisby (1992). The Alienated Mind: The Sociology of Knowledge in Germany, 1918-1933. Routledge.score: 702.0
    The Sociology of Knowledge in Weimar Germany: Its Background and Context i Any serious attempt to understand the distinctive nature of the German tradition ...
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  5. Malcolm Ashmore (1989). The Reflexive Thesis: Wrighting Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.score: 702.0
    This unusually innovative book treats reflexivity, not as a philosophical conundrum, but as a practical issue that arises in the course of scholarly research and argument. In order to demonstrate the concrete and consequential nature of reflexivity, Malcolm Ashmore concentrates on an area in which reflexive "problems" are acute: the sociology of scientific knowledge. At the forefront of recent radical changes in our understanding of science, this increasingly influential mode of analysis specializes in rigorous deconstructions of the research practices (...)
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  6. Peter Berger & Thomas Luckmann (1966/1990). The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge. Anchor Books.score: 702.0
    This book reformulates the sociological subdiscipline known as the sociology of knowledge. Knowledge is presented as more than ideology, including as well false consciousness, propaganda, science and art.
     
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  7. Axel Gelfert (2012). Art History, the Problem of Style, and Arnold Hauser's Contribution to the History and Sociology of Knowledge. Studies in East European Thought 64 (1-2):121-142.score: 696.0
    Much of Arnold Hauser’s work on the social history of art and the philosophy of art history is informed by a concern for the cognitive dimension of art. The present paper offers a reconstruction of this aspect of Hauser’s project and identifies areas of overlap with the sociology of knowledge—where the latter is to be understood as both a separate discipline and a going intellectual concern. Following a discussion of Hauser’s personal and intellectual background, as well as of the (...)
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  8. Thomas Uebel (2012). But is It Sociology of Knowledge? Wilhelm Jerusalem's “Sociology of Cognition” in Context. Studies in East European Thought 64 (1-2):5-37.score: 696.0
    This paper considers the charge that—contrary to the current widespread assumption accompanying the near-universal neglect of his work—Wilhelm Jerusalem (1854–1923) cannot count as one of the founders of the sociology of (scientific) knowledge. In order to elucidate the matter, Jerusalem’s “sociology of cognition” is here reconstructed in the context of his own work in psychology and philosophy as well as in the context of the work of some predecessors and contemporaries. It is argued that while it shows clear (...)
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  9. Gunter W. Remmling (1975). The Sociology of Karl Mannheim: With a Bibliographical Guide to the Sociology of Knowledge, Ideological Analysis, and Social Planning. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 651.0
    The significance and development of Mannheim's sociology Ancient data such as the Code of Hammurabi, the Old Testament, the Confucian Classics, ...
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  10. Oleg Zhuravlev, Daneil Kondov & Natalia Savel’eva (2009). The European University at St. Petersburg: A Case Study in Sociology of Post-Soviet Knowledge. Studies in East European Thought 61 (4):291 - 308.score: 645.0
    The article presents results of an ongoing study of centers of intellectual innovations in post-Soviet Russia. Using the European University at St. Petersburg as the main object of their analysis, the authors demonstrate how new models of academic careers, which became available in the 1980s and 1990s, were eventually institutionalized as new models of knowledge production and educational practices. Supported by American foundations, this private university had to invent a new institutional structure and to position itself within the field of (...)
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  11. Thomas Vander Ven & Marikay Vander Ven (2003). Exploring Patterns of Mother-Blaming in Anorexia Scholarship: A Study in the Sociology of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Human Studies 26 (1):97-119.score: 618.0
    Mother-blame, the propensity to explain negative outcomes for children by focusing on the failures of mothers, has a long history in the social-scientific study of adolescent deviance. We examine trends in mother-blaming over time by performing a textual analysis of scholarly accounts of the etiology of anorexia nervosa. Our reading of these expert accounts suggests that mother-blaming for child pathology is interconnected with changing ideas about proper social roles for women. Deficient mothering, that is, was often linked to a woman's (...)
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  12. Thomas Vander Ven & Marikay Vander Ven (2003). Exploring Patterns of Mother-Blaming in Anorexia Scholarship: A Study in the Sociology of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Human Studies 26 (1):97 - 119.score: 618.0
    Mother-blame, the propensity to explain negative outcomes for children by focusing on the failures of mothers, has a long history in the social-scientific study of adolescent deviance. We examine trends in mother-blaming over time by performing a textual analysis of scholarly accounts of the etiology of anorexia nervosa. Our reading of these expert accounts suggests that mother-blaming for child pathology is interconnected with changing ideas about proper social roles for women. Deficient mothering, that is, was often linked to a woman''s (...)
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  13. Max Scheler (1980). Problems of a Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 615.0
    Produced in 1961 using film shot by official war photographers provided by the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, this 26 part series covers every major ...
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  14. Gunter W. Remmling (1973). Towards the Sociology of Knowledge: Origin and Development of a Sociological Thought Style. London,Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 615.0
    Etude de la conception des grands penseurs, de Saint Simon à Mannheim en ce qui concerne la sociologie de la connaissance.
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  15. John Law (ed.) (1986). Power, Action, and Belief: A New Sociology of Knowledge? Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 615.0
  16. Jacques Jérôme Pierre Maquet (1951/1973). The Sociology of Knowledge, its Structure and its Relation to the Philosophy of Knowledge. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 615.0
  17. James E. Curtis (1970). The Sociology of Knowledge: A Reader. London,Duckworth.score: 615.0
  18. Björn Eriksson (1975). Problems of an Empirical Sociology of Knowledge. Almqvist & Wiksell International (Distr.).score: 615.0
  19. Tom W. Goff (1980). Marx and Mead: Contributions to a Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 615.0
  20. Susan J. Hekman (1986). Hermeneutics and the Sociology of Knowledge. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 615.0
  21. Irving Louis Horowitz (1976). Philosophy, Science, and the Sociology of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.score: 615.0
  22. Brian Longhurst (1989). Karl Mannheim and the Contemporary Sociology of Knowledge. St. Martin's Press.score: 615.0
  23. Karl Mannheim (1986). Conservatism: A Contribution to the Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 615.0
  24. Volker Meja & Nico Stehr (eds.) (1990). Knowledge and Politics: The Sociology of Knowledge Dispute. Routledge.score: 615.0
  25. Hans Neisser (1965). On the Sociology of Knowledge. New York, J.H. Heineman.score: 615.0
     
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  26. Francis Warren Rempel (1965). The Role of Value in Karl Mannheim's Sociology of Knowledge. The Hague, Mouton.score: 615.0
     
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  27. A. P. Simonds (1978). Karl Mannheim's Sociology of Knowledge. Clarendon Press.score: 615.0
     
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  28. Lawrence A. Teeland (1971). The Relevance of the Concept of Reference Groups to the Sociology of Knowledge. Göteborg,Universitetet, Sociologiska Institutionen.score: 615.0
     
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  29. Janet Wolff (1975). Hermeneutic Philosophy and the Sociology of Art: An Approach to Some of the Epistemological Problems of the Sociology of Knowledge and the Sociology of Art and Literature. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 615.0
  30. Werner Stark (1958). The Sociology of Knowledge. London, Routledge & Paul.score: 609.0
  31. Karl Mannheim (1952). Essays on the Sociology of Knowledge. New York, Oxford University Press.score: 609.0
  32. Si Sun (2007). A Critique of Relativism in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):115-130.score: 543.0
    “The Strong Programme” is put forward as a metaphysical theory of sociology by the Edinburgh School (SSK) to study the social causes of knowledge. Barry Barnes and David Bloor are the proponents of the School. They call their programme “the Relativist View of Knowledge” and argue against rationalism in the philosophy of science. Does their relativist account of knowledge present a serious challenge to rationalism, which has dominated 20th century philosophy of science? I attempt to answer this question by (...)
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  33. Reiner Keller (2011). The Sociology of Knowledge Approach to Discourse (SKAD). Human Studies 34 (1):43-65.score: 540.0
    The article presents the sociology of knowledge approach to discourse (SKAD). SKAD, which has been in the process of development since the middle of the 1990s, is now a widely used framework among social scientists in discourse research in the German-speaking area. It links arguments from the social constructionist tradition, following Berger and Luckmann, with assumptions based in symbolic interactionism, hermeneutic sociology of knowledge, and the concepts of Michel Foucault. It argues thereby for a consistent theoretical and methodological (...)
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  34. Brian P. Bloomfield (1988). Expert Systems and Human Knowledge: A View From the Sociology of Science. [REVIEW] AI and Society 2 (1):17-29.score: 540.0
    After the setbacks suffered in the 1970s as a result of the ‘Lighthill Report’ (Lighthill, 1973), the science of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has undergone a dramatic revival of fortunes in the 1980s. But despite the obvious enormity and complexity of the problems tackled by AI, it still remains rather parochial in relation to the import of alternative though potentially fruitful ideas from other disciplines. With this in mind, the aim of the present paper is to utilise ideas from the (...) of science in order to explore some current issues in AI and, in particular, the branch of expert systems.It is argued that the sociology of sciences shares a common focus of enquiry along with AI — namely, the nature of knowledge — and has a role to play in the understanding, design and future development of expert systems. (shrink)
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  35. Samir Okasha (2000). The Underdetermination of Theory by Data and the "Strong Programme" in the Sociology of Knowledge. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (3):283 – 297.score: 531.0
    Advocates of the "strong programme" in the sociology of knowledge have argued that, because scientific theories are "underdetermined" by data, sociological factors must be invoked to explain why scientists believe the theories they do. I examine this argument, and the responses to it by J.R. Brown (1989) and L. Laudan (1996). I distinguish between a number of different versions of the underdetermination thesis, some trivial, some substantive. I show that Brown's and Laudan's attempts to refute the sociologists' argument fail. (...)
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  36. Charles Kurzman (1994). Epistemology and the Sociology of Knowledge. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (3):267-290.score: 531.0
    Epistemology, I will argue, is of crucial importance to the sociology of knowledge— not just by way of definition of the phenomenon under study, but also because approaches to the sociology of knowledge rely on too-often implicit epistemological stances. I will make this argument through a series of categorizations: first, I will classify the field of epistemology into its three main forms; second, I will classify the sociology of knowledge into epistemological categories; third, I will classify the (...)
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  37. Edward Manier (1980). Levels of Reflexivity: Unnoted Differences Within the "Strong Programme" in the Sociology of Knowledge. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:197 - 207.score: 531.0
    A basic question confronting programs in the sociology of science is: "Can the thesis that cognitive claims are socially determined be interpreted in a way that preserves the credibility of the sociology of science, when that thesis is reflexively applied to the sociology of science?" That question is approached here by means of a critical comparison of two versions of the "strong programme" in the sociology of knowledge. The key difference is the effort in one (...)
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  38. Angelo M. Petroni (1993). Conventionalism, Scientific Discovery and the Sociology of Knowledge. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 7 (3):225 – 240.score: 531.0
    Abstract In this paper the basic aim of the so?called ?strong programme? in the sociology of knowledge is examined. The ?strong programme? is considered (and rightly so) as an extreme version of the anti?realist view of science. While the problem of scientific realism has normally been dealt with from the point of view of the ?context of justification? of theories, the paper focuses on the issues raised by law?discovery. In this context Herbert Simon's views about the existence of a (...)
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  39. Nelson Phillips (1991). The Sociology of Knowledge: Toward an Existential View of Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (10):787 - 795.score: 531.0
    Business ethics is the study of ethics as it applies to a particular sphere of human activity. As such, business ethics presupposes a difference between an individual's experience within a business organization and his or her experience outside the organization. But how do we examine this difference? How do we discuss an individual's experience of everyday reality? What processes create and sustain this reality, and how does one's version of reality affect what is, and what is not, ethical? This paper (...)
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  40. James Maffie (1999). Epistemology in the Face of Strong Sociology of Knowledge. History of the Human Sciences 12 (4):21-40.score: 531.0
    Advocates of the strong programme in the sociology of knowledge contend that its four defining tenets entail the elimination and replacement tout court of epistemology by strong sociology of knowledge. I advance a naturalistic conception of both substantive and meta-level epistemological inquiry which fully complies with these four tenets and thereby shows that the strong programme neither entails nor even augurs the demise of epistemology.
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  41. Mauricio SuáRez (1999). Epistemology in the Face of the Strong Sociology of Knowledge: A Reply to Maffie. History of the Human Sciences 12 (4):41-48.score: 531.0
    James Maffie claims that weak continuity reliabilism is compatible with the principles, as well as the insights, of the Strong Programme in the Sociology of Knowledge (SPSK). There are three possible readings of weak continuity reliabilism: I argue that the first two are unsound, while the third is actually inconsistent with the principles of SPSK. SPSK is instead compatible with an identicist epistemology, one that does not aim to distinguish scientific epistemology from our everyday epistemic practice.
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  42. Philip Walsh (2014). Is a Post-Philosophical Sociology Possible? Insights From Norbert Elias's Sociology of Knowledge. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (2):179-200.score: 531.0
    This article investigates the status of Norbert Elias’s conception of the sociology of knowledge as the means to provide a new epistemological security for sociology. The author of the article argues that this translates into an effective critique of the underlaboring model of the relationship between philosophy and the social sciences, which is consistent with Elias’s attempt to consolidate his own sociological theory. Nevertheless, the author argues that Elias’s sociology of knowledge runs into problems in its attempt (...)
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  43. Werner Stark (1960/1961). Montesquieu, Pioneer of the Sociology of Knowledge. Toronto, University of Toronto Press.score: 528.0
    First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  44. Harvey Goldman (1994). From Social Theory to Sociology of Knowledge and Back: Karl Mannheim and the Sociology of Intellectual Knowledge Production. Sociological Theory 12 (3):266-278.score: 525.0
    This paper proposes a reconsideration of Karl Mannheim and his work from the viewpoint of the needs of sociological theory. It points out certain affinities between Mannheim and some contemporary theorists, such as Gramsci and Foucault, and then reflects on certain problems in Mannheim's work, particularly the response to "relativism" and the hope of creating new "syntheses" through the sociology of knowledge. Finally, it proposes ways to draw on the sociology of intellectuals, inspired by Mannheim, in order to (...)
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  45. Richard Schantz & Markus Seidel (2011). The Problem of Relativism in the Sociology of (Scientific) Knowledge. ontos.score: 522.0
    This volume comprises original articles by leading authors – from philosophy as well as sociology – in the debate around relativism in the sociology of (scientific) knowledge. Its aim has been to bring together several threads from the relevant disciplines and to cover the discussion from historical and systematic points of view. Among the contributors are Maria Baghramian, Barry Barnes, Martin Endreß, Hubert Knoblauch, Richard Schantz and Harvey Siegel.
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  46. Arthur Fine, Science Made Up: Constructivist Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.score: 522.0
    (Draft copy published as “Science Made Up: Constructivist Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.” In P. Galison and D. Stump (eds.) The Disunity of Science: Boundaries, Contexts, and Power. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996, pp. 231-54.).
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  47. Tamás Demeter (2012). Weltanschauung as a Priori: Sociology of Knowledge From a 'Romantic' Stance. Studies in East European Thought 64 (1-2):39-52.score: 522.0
    In this paper I reconstruct the central concept of the young Lukács’s and Mannheim’s sociology of knowledge, as they present it in their writings in the early decades of the twentieth century. I argue that this concept, namely Weltanschauung, is used to refer to some conceptually unstructured totality of feelings, which they take to be a condition of possibility of intellectual production, and this understanding is contrasted to an alternative construal of the term that presents it as logically structured, (...)
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  48. Bernard Susser (1989). The Sociology of Knowledge and its Enemies. Inquiry 32 (3):245 – 260.score: 522.0
    My objective in the following study is to present and analyze the objections to the ?classical argument? in the sociology of knowledge raised by Leo Strauss and Karl Popper. Building on this expository account, I will attempt to demonstrate (1) that the opposition of Strauss and Popper is more apparent and polemical than real, (2) that the position taken by Strauss and Popper on the viability of a sociology of knowledge is essentially no different from that taken by (...)
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  49. R. Martin Goodridge (1973). Georges Gurvitch and the Sociology of Knowledge. Inquiry 16 (1-4):231-244.score: 522.0
    With the publication of The Social Frameworks of Knowledge? the English speaking world has at last been given a serious opportunity to approach the complex sociological thought of Georges Gurvitch. However, as the author himself admits in the Preface, this book appears ?abstract and schematic particularly to the uninitiated?.1 The aim of this paper will be to try to relate this translated work to the main body of Gurvitch's writing and particularly to his stance in the sociology of knowledge. (...)
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  50. Judith Feher (1984). On Surrender, Death, and the Sociology of Knowledge. Human Studies 7 (3-4):211 - 226.score: 522.0
    Surrender-and-catch is a protest against [... our time] and an attempt at remembrance of what a human being can be. The sociology of knowledge is a protest against its hypocrisy and against unexamined social influences. Like surrender, the sociology of knowledge does not fear but passionately seeks what is true and thus, like surrender, is a remembrance, proclamation, and celebration of the spirit. Both ideas, that of the sociology of knowledge and that of surrender, are critical, polemical, (...)
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