Search results for 'Knowledge, Theory of (Islam' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Ian Richard Netton (1996). Seek Knowledge: Thought and Travel in the House of Islam. Curzon Press.
    Explores various facets of the Islamic search for knowledge, with essays on aspects of Thought or Travel.
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  2.  11
    Franz Rosenthal (1970/2007). Knowledge Triumphant: The Concept of Knowledge in Medieval Islam. Brill.
    In "Knowledge Triumphant," Franz Rosenthal observes that the Islamic civilization is one that is essentially characterized by knowledge ("'ilm"), for "ilm is ...
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  3. MohdNor Wan Daud, Muhammad Zainiy Uthman & Muhammad Naguib Al-Attas (eds.) (2010). Knowledge, Language, Thought, and the Civilization of Islam: Essays in Honor of Syed Muhammad Naquib Al-Attas. Utm Press.
     
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  4. MohdNor Wan Daud (1989). The Concept of Knowledge in Islam. Mansell.
  5. Imtiyaz Yusuf, Ismaʼ Al-Faruqi & R. il (eds.) (2012). Islam and Knowledge: Al Faruqi's Concept of Religion in Islamic Thought: Essays in Honor of Isma'il Al Faruqi. I.B. Tauris.
     
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  6. Imtiyaz Yusuf & Ismaʼil R. Al-Faruqi (eds.) (2012). Islam and Knowledge: Al Faruqi's Concept of Religion in Islamic Thought: Essays in Honor of Isma'il Al Faruqi. I.B. Tauris.
     
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  7. Alexander Treiger (2011). Inspired Knowledge in Islamic Thought: Al-Ghazali's Theory of Mystical Cognition and its Avicennian Foundation. Routledge.
    It has been customary to see the Muslim theologian Abu Hamid al-Ghazali as a vehement critic of philosophy, who rejected it in favour of Islamic mysticism, a view which has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. This book argues that al-Ghazali was, instead, one of the greatest popularisers of philosophy in medieval Islam. The author supplies new evidence showing that al-Ghazali was indebted to philosophy in his theory of mystical cognition and his eschatology, and that, moreover, in these (...)
     
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  8.  26
    Sa'idu Sulaiman (1998). Islamization of Knowledge: Background, Models and the Way Forward. The International Institute of Islamic Thought.
    On the implementation aspect of the Islamization of knowledge programme, there were also suggestions that my paper should provide readers with Al-Faruqi's ...
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  9. Bashir S. Galadanci (ed.) (2000). Islamization of Knowledge: A Research Guide. International Institute of Islamic Thought, Nigeria Office.
     
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  10. Mohamed Aslam Haneef (2005). A Critical Survey of Islamization of Knowledge. International Islamic University Malaysia.
     
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  11. Muḥammad Shahābuddīn Nadvī (2004). Qur'anic Concept of Knowledge. Furqania Academy Trust.
     
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  12. Abdullateef Abubakar Siddiq (2003). Islamization of Knowledge: Epistemological Basis, Early Contributions and Present Setback. International Institute of Islamic Thought (Nigeria Office).
     
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  13. Souran Mardini (2014). Islam: Knowledge Versus Ignorance. Murat Center.
     
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  14. David Parkin (1995). Eradication and Dispersal of the Unpalatable in Islam, Medicine and Anthropological Theory. In Richard Fardon (ed.), Counterworks: Managing the Diversity of Knowledge. Routledge 136.
     
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  15.  13
    Ian Richard Netton (1999). Al-Fārābī and His School. Curzon.
    Al-Farabi and His School examines one of the most exciting and dynamic periods in the development of medieval Islam: the period which ran from the late ninth century to the early eleventh century AD. This age is examined through the thought of five of its principal thinkers and named after the first and greatest of these as the "Age of Farabism." Ian Richard Netton demonstrates that the great Islamic philosopher al-Farabi (870-950), called "the Second Master" after Aristotle, produced a recognizable (...)
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  16.  28
    İbrahim Kalın (2010). Knowledge in Later Islamic Philosophy: Mulla Sadra on Existence, Intellect, and Intuition. Oxford University Press.
    This study looks at how the seventeenth-century philosopher Sadr al-Din al-Shirazi, known as Mulla Sadra, attempted to reconcile the three major forms of ...
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  17. Hikmet Yaman (2011). Prophetic Niche in the Virtuous City: The Concept of Hikmah in Early Islamic Thought. Brill.
    Analyzing the concept of ḥikmah in early Islamic texts, this book brings earliest scholarly materials to the service of modern readers and thus offers a comprehensive contextualization of this subtle and elusive notion in the collective usage of early Muslim authors, especially in the works of lexicographers, exegetes, philosophers, and Sufis.
     
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  18.  17
    Timothy J. Gianotti (2001). Al-Ghazālī's Unspeakable Doctrine of the Soul: Unveiling the Esoteric Psychology and Eschatology of the Iḥyāʻ. Brill.
    This text marks a radical rethinking of the soul and the afterlife in the writings of al-Ghaz?l? (d. 505/1111), particularly within his magnum opus, "Reviving ...
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  19. Absar Ahmad (ed.) (1995). Knowledge-Morality Nexus: Challenging the Dominant Paradigm. Concept Media Books.
     
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  20. ʻAbd Allāh ibn ʻAlawī ʻAṭṭās (2000). Knowledge and Wisdom. Starlatch Press.
     
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  21. Ali El-Konaissi (2003). Early Muslim Concept of Epistemology. Communication & Cognition.
  22. Sa'idu Sulaiman (1999). Islamic Knowledge: Historical Background and Recent Developments. International Institute of Islamic Thought.
     
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  23. Muhammad Iqbal (1944). The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam. [Lahore?]Javid Iqbal; Can Be Had of Shaikh Muhammad Ashraf, Lahore.
    _The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam_ is Muhammad Iqbal's major philosophic work: a series of profound reflections on the perennial conflict among science, religion, and philosophy, culminating in new visions of the unity of human knowledge, of the human spirit, and of God. Iqbal's thought contributed significantly to the establishment of Pakistan, to the religious and political ideals of the Iranian Revolution, and to the survival of Muslim identity in parts of the former USSR. It now serves as new (...)
     
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  24. Souran Mardini (2014). Beyond the Perceptible Frontiers of the Intelligible. Murat Center.
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  25. Mohammed Iqbal (1935). The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam. Philosophical Review 44:407.
    _The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam_ is Muhammad Iqbal's major philosophic work: a series of profound reflections on the perennial conflict among science, religion, and philosophy, culminating in new visions of the unity of human knowledge, of the human spirit, and of God. Iqbal's thought contributed significantly to the establishment of Pakistan, to the religious and political ideals of the Iranian Revolution, and to the survival of Muslim identity in parts of the former USSR. It now serves as new (...)
     
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  26. Mohammad Iqbal (2013). The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam. Stanford University Press.
    _The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam_ is Muhammad Iqbal's major philosophic work: a series of profound reflections on the perennial conflict among science, religion, and philosophy, culminating in new visions of the unity of human knowledge, of the human spirit, and of God. Iqbal's thought contributed significantly to the establishment of Pakistan, to the religious and political ideals of the Iranian Revolution, and to the survival of Muslim identity in parts of the former USSR. It now serves as new (...)
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  27. Masudul Alam Choudhury (2006). Science and Epistemology in the Koran. Edwin Mellen Press.
    v. 1. Methodological issues and themes in the Koran -- v. 2. The nature of monotheism in Koranic thought -- v. 3. Circular causation model in the Koran -- v. 4. Monotheism applied to social issues in the Koran -- v. 5. The Koranic principle of complementarities applied to social and scientific themes.
     
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  28. Azyumardi Azra, Nanat Fatah Natsir & Hendriyanto Attan (eds.) (2010). Strategi Pendidikan: Upaya Memahami Wahyu Dan Ilmu. Pustaka Pelajar.
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  29. Muḥammad Ḥanīf Nadvī (2008). ʻaqalīyāt-I Ibn-I Taimīyah. Arīb Pablīkeshanz.
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  30.  1
    P. Mandaville (2007). Globalization and the Politics of Religious Knowledge: Pluralizing Authority in the Muslim World. Theory, Culture and Society 24 (2):101-115.
    Globalizing processes have rendered as analytically insufficient accounts of authority in the Muslim world that rely exclusively on the interaction between text, discursive method and personified knowledge. The construction and negotiation of globalized authority in Islam, it is argued, can only be understood by reference to a set of pluralizing processes that intensify and in some instances radicalize a tendency towards authoritative pluralism that has long been present in Islam. This can be understood in terms of functionalization, or changes in (...)
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  31.  61
    Seyyed Hossein Nasr & Muzaffar Iqbal (2006). Islam and Science. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press 71-86.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712108; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 71-86.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 86.; Rev from an article in The Islamic quarterly.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  32.  7
    V. Kaul (2012). 'Can Muslims Be Suicide Bombers?' An Essay on the Troubles of Multiculturalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (4-5):389-398.
    Is a Muslim still a Muslim when he crashes airplanes into the twin towers? Any serious theory of multiculturalism has to deny that Islam could ever come to justify suicide bombing and terrorism. My thesis is that none of the contemporary multicultural theories manages to do so, or at least not without collapsing into a Kantian conception of personal autonomy and, consequently, into some standard version of liberalism. Communitarianism, trying to demonstrate that fundamentalism has nothing to do with the (...)
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  33. Daniel N. Robinson (2004). The Great Ideas of Philosophy. Teaching Co..
    From the Upanishads to Homer -- Philosophy, did the Greeks invent it -- Pythagoras and the divinity of number -- What is there? -- The Greek tragedians on man's fate -- Herodotus and the lamp of history -- Socrates on the examined life -- Plato's search for truth -- Can virtue be taught? -- Plato's Republic, man writ large -- Hippocrates and the science of life -- Aristotle on the knowable -- Aristotle on friendship -- Aristotle on the perfect life (...)
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  34. Mujadad Zaman & Nadeem A. Memon (eds.) (2016). Philosophies of Islamic Education: Historical Perspectives and Emerging Discourses. Routledge.
    The study of Islamic education has hitherto remained a tangential inquiry in the broader focus of Islamic Studies. In the wake of this neglect, a renaissance of sorts has occurred in recent years, reconfiguring the importance of Islam’s attitudes to knowledge, learning and education as paramount in the study and appreciation of Islamic civilization. _Philosophies of Islamic Education_, stands in tandem to this call and takes a pioneering step in establishing the importance of its study for the educationalist, academic and (...)
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  35.  15
    Paul Ghils (2015). Editorial, Cosmopolis. Spirituality, Religion and Politics. Cosmopolis. A Journal of Cosmopolitics 7 (3-4).
    Cosmopolis A Review of Cosmopolitics -/- 2015/3-4 -/- Editorial Dominique de Courcelles & Paul Ghils -/- This issue addresses the general concept of “spirituality” as it appears in various cultural contexts and timeframes, through contrasting ideological views. Without necessarily going back to artistic and religious remains of primitive men, which unquestionably show pursuits beyond the biophysical dimension and illustrate practices seeking to unveil the hidden significance of life and death, the following papers deal with a number of interpretations covering a (...)
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  36.  2
    B. S. Turner (2007). Religious Authority and the New Media. Theory, Culture and Society 24 (2):117-134.
    In traditional societies, knowledge is organized in hierarchical chains through which authority is legitimated by custom. Because the majority of the population is illiterate, sacred knowledge is conveyed orally and ritualistically, but the ultimate source of religious authority is typically invested in the Book. The hadith are a good example of traditional practice. These chains of Islamic knowledge were also characteristically local, consensual and lay, unlike in Christianity, with its emergent ecclesiastical bureaucracies, episcopal structures and ordained priests. In one sense, (...)
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  37.  16
    Paul Lettinck (2011). Science in Adab Literature. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 21 (1):149-163.
    Books belonging to adab literature present material about a variety of subjects, considered from various points of view, such as religious, scientific, historical, literary, etc. They contain knowledge and at the same time entertainment for educated people. Here we consider the content of two adab works, insofar as they discuss subjects from the scientific point of view: Fa???l al-Khi?????b by al-T??f??sh?? and Mab??hij al-fikar wa-man??hij al-??ibar by al-Wa???w????? . Al-T??f??sh??'s work discusses astronomical and meteorological subjects. The passages on astronomy give (...)
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  38. Ian Richard Netton (1992). Al-Farabi and His School. Routledge.
    Examines one of the most exciting and dynamic periods in the development of medieval Islam, from the late 9th to the early 11th century, through the thought of five of its principal thinkers, prime among them al-Farabi. This great Islamic philosopher, called 'the Second Master' after Aristotle, produced a recognizable school of thought in which others pursued and developed some of his own intellectual preoccupations. Their thought is treated with particular reference to the most basic questions which can be asked (...)
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  39. A. Scott-Baumann (2010). Ricoeur's Translation Model as a Mutual Labour of Understanding. Theory, Culture and Society 27 (5):69-85.
    Ricoeur has written about translation as an ethical paradigm. Translation from one language to another, and within one’s own language, provides both a metaphor and a real mechanism for explaining oneself to the other. Attempting and failing to achieve symmetry between two languages is a manifestation of the asymmetry inherent in human relationships. If actively pursued, translation can show us how to forgive other people for being different from us and thus serves as a paradigm for tolerance. In full acceptance (...)
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  40.  19
    Bayu Taufiq Possumah, Abdul Ghafar Ismail & Shahida Shahimi (2013). Bringing Work Back in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):257-270.
    Religion and work are seldom discussed. The two have caused scholars to question the religion’s role with work. This paper reviews research on the integrate between religion and work by examining issues of concept, definition, measurement, and reviewing research that examines the relationship of work and religion with respect to: different times, types of people, organize human interactions and sources of knowledge. We then discuss the methodological requirement for reintegrating work studies into social institutional theory and indicate what the (...)
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  41.  4
    T. Terranova (2007). Futurepublic: On Information Warfare, Bio-Racism and Hegemony as Noopolitics. Theory, Culture and Society 24 (3):125-145.
    This article advances some considerations on the current production of hegemonic effects, starting with some problems posed by the work of one of the most influential writers in cultural studies – the American Palestinian critic Edward Said. Said's commentary on the coverage of Islam in the US media in the late 1970s allows for some challenging considerations on how hegemonic strategies directed at the formation of publics and public opinion are increasingly integrated within a global noopolitics of communication whose understanding (...)
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