Search results for 'Kristin Sharon Shrader-Frechette' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shrader-Frechette Kristin Sharon (1987). Land Use Planning and Analytic Methods of Policy Analysis: Comments on Goldstein's Essay. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 6.score: 2010.0
     
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  2. Matthew Reisman (2012). Kristin Shrader-Frechette: Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):419-422.score: 513.0
    Kristin Shrader-Frechette: Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11948-011-9267-1 Authors Matthew Benjamin Reisman, Environmental Studies, The University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, USA Journal Science and Engineering Ethics Online ISSN 1471-5546 Print ISSN 1353-3452.
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  3. Katie McShane (2003). Review of Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (9).score: 427.5
  4. Avner de-Shalit (2004). Book Review: Kristin Shrader-Frechette. Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2002. [REVIEW] Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):140-144.score: 427.5
  5. Hugh Lacey (2008). Kristin Shrader‐Frechette,Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health:Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health. Ethics 118 (4):757-761.score: 427.5
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  6. Madison Powers (2008). Review of Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).score: 427.5
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  7. Kevin Elliott (2008). Kristin Shrader‐Frechette:Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health,:Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health. Philosophy of Science 75 (2):249-251.score: 427.5
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  8. Vivian Weil (1996). Book Review:Ethics of Scientific Research. Kristin Shrader-Frechette. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (4):879-.score: 427.5
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  9. H. Montefiore (1992). Book Review : Nuclear Energy and Ethics, Edited by Kristin Shrader-Frechette. Geneva: W.C.C. Publications, 1991. 233 Pp. 10.90. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 5 (2):99-102.score: 427.5
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  10. C. Wolf (1999). Ethics of Scientific Research. Kristin Shrader-Frechette Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1994. Pp. 243. $58.50 ISBN 0-8476-7981-0 (Hardback); $26.95 ISBN 0-8476-7981-3 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Ethics and the Environment 4 (2):241-245.score: 427.5
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  11. William J. FitzPatrick, Cheryl Misak, Mark Greene, Daniel Statman, Brian Barry & Kimberley Brownlee (2008). 10. Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health (Pp. 757-761). [REVIEW] Ethics 118 (4).score: 427.5
     
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  12. Kristin Sharon Shrader-Frechette (2009). Data Trimming, Nuclear Emissions, and Climate Change. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):19-23.score: 198.0
    Ethics requires good science. Many scientists, government leaders, and industry representatives support tripling of global-nuclear-energy capacity on the grounds that nuclear fission is “carbon free” and “releases no greenhouse gases.” However, such claims are scientifically questionable (and thus likely to lead to ethically questionable energy choices) for at least 3 reasons. (i) They rely on trimming the data on nuclear greenhouse-gas emissions (GHGE), perhaps in part because flawed Kyoto Protocol conventions require no full nuclear-fuel-cycle assessment of carbon content. (ii) They (...)
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  13. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2012). What Will Work: Fighting Climate Change with Renewable Energy, Not Nuclear Power. OUP USA.score: 171.0
    What Will Work makes a rigorous and compelling case that energy efficiencies and renewable energy-and not nuclear fission or "clean coal"-are the most effective, cheapest, and equitable solutions to the pressing problem of climate change. Kristin Shrader-Frechette, a respected environmental ethicist and scientist, makes a damning case that the only reason that debate about climate change continues is because fossil-fuel interests pay non-experts to confuse the public. She then builds a comprehensive case against the argument made by many (...)
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  14. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health. OUP USA.score: 171.0
    In the United States alone, industrial and agricultural toxins account for about 60,000 avoidable cancer deaths annually. Pollution-related health costs to Americans are similarly staggering: $13 billion a year from asthma, $351 billion from cardiovascular disease, and $240 billion from occupational disease and injury. Most troubling, children, the poor, and minorities bear the brunt of these health tragedies. Why, asks Kristin Shrader-Frechette, has the government failed to protect us, and what can we do about it? In this book, (...)
     
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  15. Edward J. Gracely (1989). Comment on Shrader-Frechette's "Parfit and Mistakes in Moral Mathematics. Ethics 100 (1):157-159.score: 135.0
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  16. Dale Jamieson (1996). Book Review:Method in Ecology: Strategies for Conservation. K. S. Shrader-Frechette, E. D. McCoy. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (2):477-.score: 135.0
  17. Edwin Levy (1981). KS Shrader-Frechette, Nuclear Power and Public Policy: The Social and Ethical Problems of Fission Technology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 1 (5):224-228.score: 135.0
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  18. D. Vadnjal (1997). Lynton Keith Caldwell and Kristen Shrader-Frechette, Policy for Land: Law and Ethics. Environmental Values 6:365-365.score: 135.0
     
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  19. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2005). Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. OUP USA.score: 126.0
    Shrader-Frechette offers a rigorous philosophical discussion of environmental justice. Explaining fundamental ethical concepts such as equality, property rights, procedural justice, free informed consent, intergenerational equity, and just compensation--and then bringing them to bear on real-world social issues--she shows how many of these core concepts have been compromised for a large segment of the global population, among them Appalachians, African-Americans, workers in hazardous jobs, and indigenous people in developing nations. She argues that burdens like pollution and resource depletion need to (...)
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  20. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2001). Radiobiological Hormesis, Methodological Value Judgments, and Metascience. Perspectives on Science 8 (4):367-379.score: 85.5
    Scientists are divided on the status of hypothesis H that low doses of ionizing radiation (under 20 rads) cause hormetic (or non-harmful) effects. Military and industrial scientist s tend to accept H, while medical and environmental scientists tend to reject it. Proponents of the strong programme claim this debate shows that uncertain science can be clari ed only by greater attention to the social values in uencing it. While they are in part correct, this paper argues that methodological analyses (not (...)
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  21. Kristin Shrader‐Frechette (1992). Science, Democracy, and Public Policy. Critical Review 6 (2-3):255-264.score: 85.5
    Experts often tout highly subjective methods of policy analysis as scientific and value?free. In The Myth of Scientific Public Policy, Robert Formaini exposes the uncertainties in two of these methods, cost?benefit analysis and risk assessment. Because of these deficiencies, he concludes that ethics and political philosophy, not science, are the proper foundation for public policy. While Formaini is right to emphasize the value?ladenness of cost?benefit analysis and risk assessment, his rejection of scientific methods of policy analysis is questionable. His criticisms, (...)
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  22. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Climate Change, Nuclear Economics, and Conflicts of Interest. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):75-107.score: 85.5
    Merck suppressed data on harmful effects of its drug Vioxx, and Guidant suppressed data on electrical flaws in one of its heart-defibrillator models. Both cases reveal how financial conflicts of interest can skew biomedical research. Such conflicts also occur in electric-utility-related research. Attempting to show that increased atomic energy can help address climate change, some industry advocates claim nuclear power is an inexpensive way to generate low-carbon electricity. Surveying 30 recent nuclear analyses, this paper shows that industry-funded studies appear to (...)
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  23. Daniel C. Wigley & Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1996). Environmental Justice: A Louisiana Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (1):61-82.score: 85.5
    The paper begins with a brief analysis of the concepts of environmental justice and environmental racism and classism. The authors argue that pollution- and environment-related decision-making is prima facie wrong whenever it results in inequitable treatment of individuals on the basis of race or socio-economic status. The essay next surveys the history of the doctrine of free informed consent and argues that the consent of those affected is necessary for ensuring the fairness of decision-making for siting hazardous facilities. The paper (...)
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  24. John Lemons, Kristin Shrader-Frechette & Carl Cranor (1997). The Precautionary Principle: Scientific Uncertainty and Type I and Type II Errors. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 2 (2):207-236.score: 85.5
    We provide examples of the extent and nature of environmental and human health problems and show why in the United States prevailing scientific and legal burden of proof requirements usually cannot be met because of the pervasiveness of scientific uncertainty. We also provide examples of how may assumptions, judgments, evaluations, and inferences in scientific methods are value-laden and that when this is not recognized results of studies will appear to be more factual and value-neutral than warranted. Further, we show that (...)
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  25. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Fukushima, Flawed Epistemology, and Black-Swan Events. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (3):267 - 272.score: 85.5
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 267-272, October 2011.
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  26. Kristin S. Shrader-Frechette (1988). Agriculture, Ethics, and Restrictions on Property Rights. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (1):21-40.score: 85.5
    The argument in this essay is twofold. (1) Procedural justice requires,in particular cases, that we restrict property rights in natural resources, e.g., California agricultural land or Appalachian coal land. (2) Conditions imposed by Locke's political theory and by dense population require,in general, that we restrict property rights in finite or non-renewable natural resources such as land. If these arguments are correct, then we have a moral imperative to use land-use controls (such as taxation, planning, zoning, and acreage limitations) to restructure (...)
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  27. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2006). Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle by Cass Sunstein. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (1):123–125.score: 85.5
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  28. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1985). Technological Risk and Small Probabilities. Journal of Business Ethics 4 (6):431 - 445.score: 85.5
    Many scientists, businessmen, and government regulators believe that the criteria for acceptable societal risk are too stringent. Those who subscribe to this belief often accept the view which I call the probability-threshold position. Proponents of this stance maintain that society ought to ignore very small risks, i.e., those causing an average annual probability of fatality of less than 10–6.After examining the three major views in the risk-evaluation debate, viz., the probability-threshold position, the zero-risk position, and the weighted-risk position, I focus (...)
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  29. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1994). Equity and Nuclear Waste Disposal. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (2):133-156.score: 85.5
    Following the recommendations of the US National Academy of Sciences and the mandates of the 1987 Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act, the US Department of Energy has proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada as the site of the world's first permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste. The main justification for permanent disposal (as opposed to above-ground storage) is that it guarantees safety by means of waste isolation. This essay argues, however, that considerations of equity (safer for whom?) undercut the safety rationale. The (...)
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  30. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2003). Review of Cass Sunstein, Risk and Reason. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (4).score: 85.5
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  31. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2005). Property Rights and Genetic Engineering: Developing Nations at Risk. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):137-149.score: 85.5
    Eighty percent of (commercial) genetically engineered seeds (GES) are designed only to resist herbicides. Letting farmers use more chemicals, they cut labor costs. But developing nations say GES cause food shortages, unemployment, resistant weeds, and extinction of native cultivars when “volunteers” drift nearby. While GES patents are reasonable, this paper argues many patent policies are not. The paper surveys GE technology, outlines John Locke’s classic account of property rights, and argues that current patent policies must be revised to take account (...)
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  32. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2007). Nanotoxicology and Ethical Conditions for Informed Consent. NanoEthics 1 (1):47-56.score: 85.5
    While their strength, electrical, optical, or magnetic properties are expected to contribute a trillion dollars in global commerce before 2015, nanomaterials also appear to pose threats to human health and safety. Nanotoxicology is the study of these threats. Do nanomaterial benefits exceed their risks? Should all nanomaterials be regulated? Currently nanotoxicologists cannot help answer these questions because too little is known about nanomaterials, because their properties differ from those of bulk materials having the same chemical composition, and because they differ (...)
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  33. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1987). Parfit and Mistakes in Moral Mathematics. Ethics 98 (1):50-60.score: 85.5
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  34. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2010). Conceptual Analysis and Special-Interest Science: Toxicology and the Case of Edward Calabrese. Synthese 177 (3):449 - 469.score: 85.5
    One way to do socially relevant investigations of science is through conceptual analysis of scientific terms used in special-interest science (SIS). SIS is science having welfare-related consequences and funded by special interests, e.g., tobacco companies, in order to establish predetermined conclusions. For instance, because the chemical industry seeks deregulation of toxic emissions and avoiding costly cleanups, it funds SIS that supports the concept of "hormesis" (according to which low doses of toxins/carcinogens have beneficial effects). Analyzing the hormesis concept of its (...)
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  35. Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Human Rights and Duties to Alleviate Environmental Injustice: The Domestic Case.score: 85.5
    To the degree that citizens have participated in, or derived benefits from, social in- stitutions that have helped cause serious, life-threatening, or rights-threatening envi- ronmental injustice (EIJ), this article argues that they have duties either to stop their participation in these institutions or to compensate for it by helping to reform them. (EIJ occurs whenever children, poor people, minorities, or other subgroups bear dis- proportionate burdens of life-threatening or seriously harmful pollution.) After briefly defining “human rights,” the article defends the (...)
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  36. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1995). Practical Ecology and Foundations for Environmentals Ethics. Journal of Philosophy 92 (12):621-635.score: 85.5
  37. Jay Odenbaugh (2001). Ecological Stability, Model Building, and Environmental Policy: A Reply to Some of the Pessimism. Philosophy of Science 68 (S1):S493-.score: 85.5
    Recently, there has been a rise in pessimism concerning what theoretical ecology can offer conservation biologists in the formation of reasonable environmental policies. In this paper, I look at one of the pessimistic arguments offered by Kristin Shrader-Frechette and E. D. McCoy (1993, 1994)--the argument from conceptual imprecision. I suggest that their argument rests on an inadequate account of the concepts of ecological stability and that there has been conceptual progress with respect to complexity-stability hypotheses. Such progress, I (...)
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  38. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2013). Answering "Scientific" Attacks on Ethical Imperatives: Wind and Solar Versus Nuclear Solutions to Climate Change. Ethics and the Environment 18 (1):1-17.score: 85.5
    Scientists and engineers often are not much interested in theoretical-ethics discussions. Frequently, like Harvard’s Cass Sunstein (2002), they propose “freemarket environmentalism,” basing environmental decisions on cost-benefit analysis and on saving the greatest number of lives for the fewest number of dollars. They say that when society overregulates, by emotively and irrationally rejecting environmental-risk decisions based only on cost-benefit analysis (CBA), it reduces manufacturing jobs, shrinks the economic pie, makes people poorer, and thus causes unnecessary deaths. To avoid these economic problems—that (...)
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  39. Kristin Shrader-Frechette & Earl D. Mccoy (1994). Applied Ecology and the Logic of Case Studies. Philosophy of Science 61 (2):228-249.score: 85.5
    Because of the problems associated with ecological concepts, generalizations, and proposed general theories, applied ecology may require a new "logic" of explanation characterized neither by the traditional accounts of confirmation nor by the logic of discovery. Building on the works of Grunbaum, Kuhn, and Wittgenstein, we use detailed descriptions from research on conserving the Northern Spotted Owl, a case typical of problem solving in applied ecology, to (1) characterize the method of case studies; (2) survey its strengths; (3) summarize and (...)
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  40. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2005). Mortgaging the Future: Dumping Ethics with Nuclear Waste. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):518-520.score: 85.5
    On August 22, 2005 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued proposed new regulations for radiation releases from the planned permanent U.S. nuclear-waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The goal of the new standards is to provide public-health protection for the next million years — even though everyone admits that the radioactive wastes will leak. Regulations now guarantee individual and equal protection against all radiation exposures above the legal limit. Instead E.P.A. recommended different radiation exposure-limits for different time periods. It also (...)
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  41. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2008). Review of Jonathan Wolff, Avner de-Shalit, Disadvantage. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).score: 85.5
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  42. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2006). Comparativist Philosophy of Science and Population Viability Assessment in Biology: Helping Resolve Scientific Controversy. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):817-828.score: 85.5
    Comparing alternative scientific theories obviously is relevant to theory assessment, but are comparativists (like Laudan) correct when they also make it necessary? This paper argues that they are not. Defining rationality solely in terms of theories' comparative problem-solving strengths, comparativist philosophers of science like Laudan subscribe to what I call the irrelevance claim (IC) and the necessity claim (NC). According to IC, a scientific theory's being well or poorly confirmed is "irrelevant" to its acceptance; NC is the claim that "all (...)
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  43. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1991). Ethical Dilemmas and Radioactive Waste: A Survey of the Issues. Environmental Ethics 13 (4):327-343.score: 85.5
    The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chemobyl have slowed the development of commercial nuclear fission in most industrialized countries , although nuclear proponents are trying to develop smaller, allegedly “fail-safe” reactors. Regardless of whether or not they succeed, we will face the problem of radioactive wastes for the next million years. After a brief, “revisionist” history of the radwaste problem, Isurvey some of the major epistemological and ethical difficulties with storing nuclear wastes and outline four ethical dilemmas common to (...)
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  44. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2002). Trading Jobs for Health: Ionizing Radiation, Occupational Ethics, and the Welfare Argument. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):139-154.score: 85.5
    Blue-collar workers throughout the world generally face higher levels of pollution than the public and are unable to control many health risks that employers impose on them. Economists tend to justify these risky workplaces on the grounds of the compensating wage differential (CWD). The CWD, or hazard-pay premium, is the alleged increment in wages, all things being equal, that workers in hazardous environments receive. According to this theory, employees trade safety for money on the job market, even though they realize (...)
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  45. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2004). Comparativist Rationality And. Topoi 23 (2):153-163.score: 85.5
    US testing of nuclear weapons has resulted in about 800,000 premature fatal cancers throughout the globe, and the nuclear tests of China, France, India, Russia, and the UK have added to this total. Surprisingly, however, these avoidable deaths have not received much attention, as compared, for example, to the smaller number of US fatalities on 9-11-01. This essay (1) surveys the methods and models used to assess effects of low-dose ionizing radiation from above-ground nuclear weapons tests and (2) explains some (...)
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  46. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1988). Risk Assessment and Uncertainty. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:504 - 517.score: 85.5
    The "prevailing opinion" among decision theorists, according to John Harsanyi, is to use the Bayesian rule, even in situations of uncertainty. I want to argue that the prevailing opinion is wrong, at least in the case of societal risks under uncertainty. Admittedly Bayesian rules are better in many cases of individual risk or certainty. (Both Bayesian and maximin strategies are sometimes needed.) Although I shall not take the time to defend all these points in detail, I shall argue (1) that (...)
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  47. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2005). Radiobiology and Gray Science: Flaws in Landmark New Radiation Protections. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):167-169.score: 85.5
    The International Commission on Radiological Protection — whose regularly updated recommendations are routinely adopted as law throughout the globe — recently issued the first-ever ICRP protections for the environment. These draft 2005 proposals are significant both because they offer the commission’s first radiation protections for any non-human parts of the planet and because they will influence both the quality of radiation risk assessment and environmental protection, as well as the global costs of nuclear-weapons cleanup, reactor decommissioning and radioactive waste management. (...)
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  48. Kristin Shrader‐Frechette (2004). Cass Sunstein, Risk and Reason:Risk and Reason. Ethics 114 (2):376-380.score: 85.5
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  49. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2008). Statistical Significance in Biology: Neither Necessary nor Sufficient for Hypothesis Acceptance. Biological Theory 3 (1):12-16.score: 85.5
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  50. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1997). Book Review:The Book of Risks: Fascinating Facts About the Chances We Take Every Day Larry Laudan. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 64 (3):521-.score: 85.5
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