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  1. Kwong-Loi Shun (2010). Zhu XI on the “Internal” and the “External”: A Response to Chan Lee. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):639-654.
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  2. Kwong-loi Shun (2008). Wholeness in Confucian Thought : Zhu XI on Cheng, Zhong, Xin, and Jing. In Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.), The Imperative of Understanding: Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, and Onto-Hermeneutics: A Tribute Volume Dedicated to Professor Chung-Ying Cheng. Global Scholarly Publications.
     
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  3. Qingsong Shen & Kwong-loi Shun (eds.) (2007). Confucian Ethics in Retrospect and Prospect. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
    desire. It is misleading to say that shu concerns the nature of desire in the ordinary sense, for it has more to do with the manner of satisfaction than ...
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  4. Kwong-Loi Shun (2005). Zhu Xi on Gong (Impartial) and Si (Partial). Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):1-9.
  5. Kwong-loi Shun (2004). Conception of the Person in Early Confucian Thought. In Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge. 183--199.
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  6. Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.) (2004). Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge.
    The Chinese ethical tradition has often been thought to oppose Western views of the self--as autonomous and possessed of individual rights--with views that emphasize the centrality of relationship and community to the self. The essays in this collection discuss the validity of that contrast as it concerns Confucianism, the single most influential Chinese school of thought. (Alasdair MacIntyre, who has significantly articulated the need for dialogue across traditions, contributes a concluding essay of commentary.).
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  7. Kwong-loi Shun (2002). Ren 仁 and Li 禮 in the Analects. In Bryan W. Van Norden (ed.), Confucius and the Analects: New Essays. Oup Usa. 53--72.
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  8. John Carriero, Michael Ferejohn, Michael Jubien, Philip Kain, Kwong-Loi Shun, David W. Smith, Michael Tye, Julie Van Camp & Georgia Warnke (2000). Richard Arneson University of California, San Diego Alison Leigh Brown Northern Arizona University. Philosophical Studies 99 (1).
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  9. Kwong-loi Shun (1997). Mencius and Early Chinese Thought. Stanford University Press.
    Throughout much of Chinese history, Mencius (372-289 BC) was considered the greatest Confucian thinker after Confucius himself. Following the enshrinement of the Mencius (an edited compilation of his thought by disciples) as one of the Four Books by Sung neo-Confucianists, he was studied by all educated Chinese. This book begins a reassessment of Mencius by studying his ethical thinking in relation to that of other early Chinese thinkers, including Confucius, Mo Tzu, the Yangists, and Hsün Tzu. The author closely examines (...)
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  10. Kwong-loi Shun (1997). Mencius on Jen-Hsing. Philosophy East and West 47 (1):1-20.
    The use of the term hsing in the Meng-tzu is discussed, along with Mencius' views on jen-hsing. It is argued that while the use of hsing need not connote something unlearned and shared, Mencius did view jen-hsing in terms of certain unlearned emotional predispositions shared by all jen. He regarded jen as a species distinguished from other animals by its capability of cultural accomplishment, and felt that it is the presence of the emotional predispositions that makes this possible.
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  11. Shu-hsien Liu & Kwong-loi Shun (1996). Some Reflections on Mencius' Views of Mind-Heart and Human Nature. Philosophy East and West 46 (2):143-164.
    The origin, content, argumentative basis, practical implication, and influence of Mencius' views of mind-heart and human nature are discussed. While the differences between Confucius and Mencius are acknowledged, it is argued that Mencius' view that human nature is good is consistent with and is a further development of basic ideas in Confucius' thinking. The basis of Mencius' view is not empirical generalization but inner reflection and personal experience, which reveal a shared natural endowment in human beings with a transcendental source. (...)
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  12. Kwong-Loi Shun (1996). Ideal Motivations and Reflective Understanding. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):91 - 104.
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  13. Kwong-Loi Shun (1995). Confucian Ethics of the Axial Age: A Reconstruction Under the Aspect of the Breakthrough Toward Postconventional Thinking by Heiner Roetz. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):351-362.
  14. Kwong-loi Shun (1993). Jen and Li in the "Analects". Philosophy East and West 43 (3):457-479.
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  15. Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). Mencius and the Mind‐Dependence of Morality: An Analysis of Meng Tzu 6a‐a‐51: (I) the Mind‐Inherence and the Mind‐Dependence of Morality. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (2):169-193.
  16. Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). Mencius and the Mind-Inherence of Morality: Mencius' Rejection of Kao Tzu's Maxim in Meng Tzu 2a:2 1: I. Kao Tzu's Maxim. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):371-386.
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  17. Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). The Self in Confucian Ethics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (1):25-35.
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  18. Kwong-loi Shun (1991). Mencius' Criticism of Mohism: An Analysis of "Meng Tzu" 3a:. Philosophy East and West 41 (2):203-214.
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  19. Kwong-Loi Shun (1989). Moral Reasons in Confucian Ethics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 16 (3-4):317-343.
  20. Kwong-Loi Shun (1988). A Ready Reference to Philosophy East and West. Teaching Philosophy 11 (4):371-373.
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