21 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Kyle Swan (National University of Singapore)
  1. Kyle Swan (2012). J.B. Schneewind, Essays on the History of Moral Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 447 Pages. ISBN: 978-0199563012 (Hbk.). Hardback/Paperback: $90/35. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):295-298.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kyle Swan (2012). Republican Equality. Social Theory and Practice 38 (3):432-454.
    Philosophers attracted to the republican ideal of freedom as nondomination sometimes offer the thought that a state concerned to promote this ideal would be more committed to economic justice than a liberal state pursuing freedom as noninterference. The republican commitment to economic justice is more demanding and its provisions are more substantial. These philosophers overstate republican redistributive commitments. The state need only provide a basic set of capabilities in order to achieve the republican goal, and concerns about domination in society (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kyle Swan & Kevin Vallier (2012). The Normative Significance of Conscience. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 6 (3):1-21.
    Despite the increasing amount of literature on the legal and political questions triggered by a commitment to liberty of conscience, an explanation of the normative significance of conscience remains elusive. We argue that the few attempts to address this fail to capture the reasons people have to respect the consciences of others. We offer an alternative account that utilizes the resources of the contractualist tradition in moral philosophy to explain why conscience matters.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kyle Swan (2010). Legal Toleration for Belief and Behaviour. History of Political Thought 31 (1):87-106.
    While most Christians have come to accept that there should be no attempt on the part of the state to coerce strict matters of conscience, many actively support the state coercively interfering with certain modes of conduct that violate God’s moral law. The development of this stance occurred during the seventeenth century English toleration debates. Then, tolerationists argued that there should be toleration for dissenting Protestant denominations, and eventually for Catholics, heretics, and atheists, too. But very few strict biblical Christians, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Loren Lomasky & Kyle Swan (2009). Wealth and Poverty in the Liberal Tradition. The Independent Review 13 (4):493-510.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kyle Swan (2009). Hell and Divine Reasons for Action. Religious Studies 45 (1):51-61.
    Escapism, a theory of hell proposed by Andrei Buckareff and Allen Plug, explicitly relies on claims about divine reasons for action. However, they say surprisingly little about the general account of reasons for action that would justify the inferences in the argument for escapism. I provide a couple of plausible interpretations of such an account and argue that they help revive the ‘Job objection’ to escapism that Buckareff and Plug had dismissed.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kyle Swan (2007). Critical Study of Michael Gill, The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics. In Philo. 177-186.
  8. Kyle Swan (2007). Law, Liberty, and Christian Morality. Religious Studies 43 (4):395-415.
    There is a long liberal political tradition of marshalling arguments aimed at convincing Christians that distinctively Christian reasons for issuing coercive laws are not sufficient to justify those laws. In the first part of this paper I argue that the two most popular of these arguments, attributable to Locke, will not reliably convince committed biblical Christians, nor, probably, should they. In the second part I argue that even if the Lockean arguments fail, committed biblical Christians should think that God has (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kyle Swan (2007). When Experiments in Living Go Awry. In Jonathan Riley (ed.), Studies in the History of Ethics, Symposium: J.S. Mill's Ethics.
    What reactions are legitimate when someone is pursuing an experiment in living that has, in your considered view, gone awry? This essay discusses how the way Mill expressed his concern over the cultivation of individuality places some stress on the harm principle and on the permissibility of making the sort of judgments about another person that seem fairly natural to make when someone is pursuing an experiment in living that has gone considerably awry. It is surprisingly difficult, but I argue (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kyle Swan (2006). A Metaethical Option for Theists. In Journal of Religious Ethics. 3-20.
    John Hare has proposed “prescriptive realism” in an attempt to stake out a middle-ground position in the twentieth century Anglo-American debates concerning metaethics between substantive moral realists and antirealist-expressivists. The account is supposed to preserve both the normativity and objectivity of moral judgments. Hare defends a version of divine command theory. The proposal succeeds in establishing the middle-ground position Hare intended. However, I argue that prescriptive realism can be strengthened in an interesting way.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kyle Swan (2006). Can a Good Christian Be a Good Liberal? In Public Affairs Quarterly. 163-173.
    A good Christian can be a good liberal, and perhaps should be, because liberalism is the political theory most consistent with the biblical mandate concerning the role of the state and its officers. The argument for this is made in terms that any good Christian should find acceptable, and then two policy implications are briefly discussed.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Kyle Swan (2006). Journal of Religious Ethics.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kyle Swan (2006). Public Affairs Quarterly.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Kyle Swan (2004). Copping Out on the Anything-Goes Objection. In Philosophia Christi. 289-294.
    I suggest a strategy for defending the Divine Command Theory of morality against the familiar “anything goes” objection. The objection is that this theory of morality has counter-intuitive moral implications. I argue that the objection fails to notice the difference between a first-order expression of a moral proposition and a second-order metaethical account of what justifies moral standards. The objection treats the theory as if it were the former, when it is actually the latter.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Kyle Swan (2004). Moral Judgment and Emotions. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (3):375-381.
    Linda Zagzebski’s recent account of the role of emotion in the structure of moral judgments aims to reconcile the role of affect in these judgments with moral cognitivism. The account is implausible because it is based on a problematic analysis of what it is to express a moral attitude and because it makes making a moral judgment unduly difficult. I suggest a way to reconcile Zagzebski’s intuitions about moral judgments that does not encounter these two problems.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Kyle Swan (2004). Philosophia Christi.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kyle Swan (2003). Journal of Markets and Morality.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Kyle Swan (2003). Three Concepts of Political Liberty. In Journal of Markets and Morality. 117-142.
    The distinction between negative and positive liberty is familiar to political philosophers. The negative variety is freedom as noninterference. The positive variety is freedom as self-mastery. However, recently there has been an attempt on the part of a growing number of philosophers, historians, and legal scholars to recapture a third concept of political liberty uncovered from within the rich tradition of civic republicanism. Republican political liberty is freedom as nondomination. I argue that features that distinguish it from noninterference and self-mastery (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Kyle Swan (2002). Alexander Kaufman, Welfare in the Kantian State (Book Review). Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (4):563-566.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Kyle Swan (2002). Emotivism and Deflationary Truth. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (3):270–281.
    The paper investigates different ways to understand the claim that non-cognitivist theories of morality are incoherent. According to the claim, this is so because, on one theory of truth, non-cognitivists are not able to deny objective truth to moral judgments without taking a substantive normative position. I argue that emotivism is not self-defeating in this way. The charge of incoherence actually only amounts to a claim that emotivism is incompatible with deflationary truth, but this claim is based upon a mistake. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Gregory R. Beabout, Ricardo F. Crespo, Stephen J. Grabill, Kim Paffenroth & Kyle Swan (2001). Beyond Self-Interest: A Personalist Approach to Human Action. Lexington Books.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation