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Profile: Kyle Powys Whyte (Michigan State University)
  1. Matt Ferkany & Kyle Whyte (forthcoming). Environmental Education, Wicked Problems and Virtue. Philosophy of Education.
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  2. Kyle Powys Whyte (2014). Indigenous Women, Climate Change Impacts, and Collective Action. Hypatia 29 (3):599-616.
    Indigenous peoples must adapt to current and coming climate-induced environmental changes like sea-level rise, glacier retreat, and shifts in the ranges of important species. For some indigenous peoples, such changes can disrupt the continuance of the systems of responsibilities that their communities rely on self-consciously for living lives closely connected to the earth. Within this domain of indigeneity, some indigenous women take seriously the responsibilities that they may perceive they have as members of their communities. For the indigenous women who (...)
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  3. Kristie Dotson & Kyle Whyte (2013). Environmental Justice, Unknowability and Unqualified Affectability. Ethics and the Environment 18 (2):55-79.
    Environmental justice seeks fairness in how environmental burdens and risks are visited on poor people, women, communities of color, Indigenous peoples, minorities, and citizens of developing countries. It also concerns whether members of these same groups have fair access to environmental goods such as urban green spaces, forested areas, and clean water. Environmental goods extend, also, to opportunities to benefit from enterprises such as tourism and green infrastructure (Shrader-Frechette 2002; Bullard 2000; Taylor 2000; Whyte 2010). The moral wrongs characteristic of (...)
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  4. Jathan Sadowski, Thomas P. Seager, Evan Selinger, Susan G. Spierre & Kyle P. Whyte (2013). An Experiential, Game-Theoretic Pedagogy for Sustainability Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1323-1339.
    The wicked problems that constitute sustainability require students to learn a different set of ethical skills than is ordinarily required by professional ethics. The focus for sustainability ethics must be redirected towards: (1) reasoning rather than rules, and (2) groups rather than individuals. This need for a different skill set presents several pedagogical challenges to traditional programs of ethics education that emphasize abstraction and reflection at the expense of experimentation and experience. This paper describes a novel pedagogy of sustainability ethics (...)
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  5. James Sj Schwartz, Donald G. Richards, Kristie Dotson, Kyle Whyte, Sally J. Scholz, Lars Samuelsson & Marion Hourdequin (2013). 7. Notes on Contributors Notes on Contributors (Pp. 135-136). Ethics and the Environment 18 (2).
     
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  6. Albert Borgmann, Holly Jean Buck, Wylie Carr, Forrest Clingerman, Maialen Galarraga, Benjamin Hale, Marion Hourdequin, Ashley Mercer, Konrad Ott, Clare Palmer, Ronald Sandler, Patrick Taylor Smith, Bronislaw Szerszynski & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. Lexington Books.
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  7. Lawrence Busch & Kyle Whyte (2012). On the Peculiarity of Standards: A Reply to Thompson. Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):243-248.
    Abstract As Paul B. Thompson suggests in his recent seminal paper, “‘There’s an App for That’: Technical Standards and Commodification by Technological Means,” technical standards restructure property (and other social) relations. He concludes with the claim that the development of technical standards of commodification can serve purposes with bad effects such as “the rise of the factory system and the deskilling of work” or progressive effects such as how “technical standards for animal welfare… discipline the unwanted consequences of market forces.” (...)
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  8. Matt Ferkany & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). The Importance of Participatory Virtues in the Future of Environmental Education. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):419-434.
    Participatory approaches to environmental decision making and assessment continue to grow in academic and policy circles. Improving how we understand the structure of deliberative activities is especially important for addressing problems in natural resources, climate change, and food systems that have wicked dimensions, such as deep value disagreements, high degrees of uncertainty, catastrophic risks, and high costs associated with errors. Yet getting the structure right is not the only important task at hand. Indeed, participatory activities can break down and fail (...)
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  9. Evan Selinger & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). What Counts as a Nudge? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):11-12.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 11-12, February 2012.
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  10. Daniel Steel & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). Environmental Justice, Values, and Scientific Expertise. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):163-182.
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  11. Paul Thompson & Kyle Whyte (2012). What Happens to Environmental Philosophy in a Wicked World? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):485-498.
    Abstract What is the significance of the wicked problems framework for environmental philosophy? In response to wicked problems, environmental scientists are starting to welcome the participation of social scientists, humanists, and the creative arts. We argue that the need for interdisciplinary approaches to wicked problems opens up a number of tasks that environmental philosophers have every right to undertake. The first task is for philosophers to explore new and promising ways of initiating philosophical research through conducting collaborative learning processes on (...)
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  12. Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). Now This! Indigenous Sovereignty, Political Obliviousness and Governance Models for SRM Research. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):172 - 187.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 172-187, June 2012.
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  13. Kyle Powys Whyte, Evan Selinger, Arthur L. Caplan & Jathan Sadowski (2012). Nudge, Nudge or Shove, Shove—The Right Way for Nudges to Increase the Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):32-39.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein (2008) contend that mandated choice is the most practical nudge for increasing organ donation. We argue that they are wrong, and their mistake results from failing to appreciate how perceptions of meaning can influence people's responses to nudges. We favor a policy of default to donation that is subject to immediate family veto power, includes options for people to opt out (and be educated on how to do so), and emphasizes the role of organ procurement (...)
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  14. Kyle Powys Whyte & Paul B. Thompson (2012). Ideas for How to Take Wicked Problems Seriously. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):441-445.
    Ideas for How to Take Wicked Problems Seriously Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9348-9 Authors Kyle Powys Whyte, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 S. Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Paul B. Thompson, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, 503 S. Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  15. Evan Selinger, Jesús Aguilar & Kyle Powys Whyte (2011). Action Schemes: Questions and Suggestions. Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):83-88.
    Action Schemes: Questions and Suggestions Content Type Journal Article Pages 83-88 DOI 10.1007/s13347-010-0007-2 Authors Evan Selinger, Department of Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY USA Jesús Aguilar, Department of Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY USA Kyle Powys Whyte, Department of Philosophy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI USA Journal Philosophy & Technology Online ISSN 2210-5441 Print ISSN 2210-5433 Journal Volume Volume 24 Journal Issue Volume 24, Number 1.
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  16. Kyle Powys Whyte (2011). Why Not Environmental Injustice? Ethics, Policy and Environment 13 (3):333-336.
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  17. Kyle Powys Whyte, Evan Selinger & Kevin Outterson (2011). Poverty Tourism and the Problem of Consent. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (3):337-348.
    Is it morally permissible for financially privileged tourists to visit places for the purpose of experiencing where poor people live, work, and play? Tourism associated with this question is commonly referred to as ?poverty tourism?. While some poverty tourism is plausibly ethical, other practices will be more controversial. The purpose of this essay is to address mutually beneficial cases of poverty tourism and advance the following positions. First, even mutually beneficial transactions between tourists and residents in poverty tourism always run (...)
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  18. Soren Riis, Evan Selinger & Kyle Powys Whyte (2010). Nudging Utopia. Future Orientation, Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies Magazine 1:29-33.
    A sketch of some of the implications of nudges.
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  19. Evan Selinger & Kyle Powys Whyte (2010). Competence and Trust in Choice Architecture. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):461-482.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein’s Nudge advances a theory of how designers can improve decision-making in various situations where people have to make choices. We claim that the moral acceptability of nudges hinges in part on whether they can provide an account of the competence required to offer nudges, an account that would serve to warrant our general trust in choice architects. What needs to be considered, on a methodological level, is whether they have clarified the competence required for choice (...)
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  20. Kyle Powys Whyte (2010). An Ethics of Recognition for Environmental Tourism Practices. Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):75-92.
    Environmental tourism is a growing practice in indigenous communities worldwide. As members of indigenous communities, what environmental justice framework should we use to evaluate these practices? I argue that, while some of the most relevant and commonly discussed norms are fair compensation and participative justice, we should also follow Robert Figueroa’s claim that “recognition justice” is relevant for environmental justice. I claim that from Figueroa’s analysis there is a “norm of direct participation,” which requires all environmental tourism practices to feature (...)
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  21. Kyle Powys Whyte & Robert Crease (2010). Trust, Expertise and the Philosophy of Science. Synthese 177 (3):411-425.
    Trust is a central concept in the philosophy of science. We highlight how trust is important in the wide variety of interactions between science and society. We claim that examining and clarifying the nature and role of trust (and distrust) in relations between science and society is one principal way in which the philosophy of science is socially relevant. We argue that philosophers of science should extend their efforts to develop normative conceptions of trust that can serve to facilitate trust (...)
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  22. Brady Thomas Heiner & Kyle Powys Whyte (2008). A Proposal for Genetically Modifying the Project of “Naturalizing” Phenomenology. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):179-193.
    In this paper, we examine Shaun Gallagher’s project of “naturalizing” phenomenology with the cognitive sciences: front-loaded phenomenology (FLP). While we think it is a productive <span class='Hi'>proposal</span>, we argue that Gallagher does not employ genetic phenomenological methods in his execution of FLP. We show that without such methods, FLP’s attempt to locate neurological correlates of conscious experience is not yet adequate. We demonstrate this by analyzing Gallagher’s critique of cognitive neuropsychologist Christopher Frith’s functional explanation of schizophrenic symptoms. In “constraining” Gallagher’s (...)
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