89 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Lloyd Humberstone [83]L. Humberstone [7]
  1.  28
    Lloyd Humberstone (2011). The Connectives. MIT Press.
    It will be an essential resource for philosophers, mathematicians, computer scientists, linguists, or any scholar who finds connectives, and the conceptual issues surrounding them, to be a source of interest.This landmark work offers both ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  2. Martin Davies & Lloyd Humberstone (1980). Two Notions of Necessity. Philosophical Studies 38 (1):1-31.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   76 citations  
  3.  81
    Lloyd Humberstone (2004). Two-Dimensional Adventures. Philosophical Studies 118 (1-2):17--65.
    This paper recalls some applications of two-dimensional modal logic from the 1980s, including work on the logic of Actually and on a somewhat idealized version of the indicative/subjunctive distinction, as well as on absolute and relative necessity. There is some discussion of reactions this material has aroused in commentators since. We also survey related work by Leslie Tharp from roughly the same period.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  4.  48
    Lloyd Humberstone (2000). The Revival of Rejective Negation. Journal of Philosophical Logic 29 (4):331-381.
    Whether assent ("acceptance") and dissent ("rejection") are thought of as speech acts or as propositional attitudes, the leading idea of rejectivism is that a grasp of the distinction between them is prior to our understanding of negation as a sentence operator, this operator then being explicable as applying to A to yield something assent to which is tantamount to dissent from A. Widely thought to have been refuted by an argument of Frege's, rejectivism has undergone something of a revival in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  5.  42
    Lloyd Humberstone (2008). Parts and Partitions. Theoria 66 (1):41-82.
    Our object is to study the interaction between mereology and David Lewis’ theory of subject-matters, elaborating his observation that not every subject matter is of the form: how things stand with such-and-such a part of the world. After an informal introduction to this point in Section 1, we turn to a formal treatment of the partial orderings arising in the two areas – the part-whole relation, on the one hand, and the relation of refinement amongst partitions of the set of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  6. Lloyd Humberstone (2005). Modality. In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy. Oxford University Press
  7.  7
    Lloyd Humberstone (2016). Note on Extending Congruential Modal Logics. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 57 (1):95-103.
    It is observed that a consistent congruential modal logic is not guaranteed to have a consistent extension in which the Box operator becomes a truth-functional connective for one of the four one-place truth functions.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  4
    Lloyd Humberstone (forthcoming). Sentence Connectives in Formal Logic. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  9.  54
    Lloyd Humberstone (2014). Plural Logic, by Alex Oliver and Timothy Smiley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):192-195.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  47
    A. P. Hazen & Lloyd Humberstone (2004). Similarity Relations and the Preservation of Solidity. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13 (1):25-46.
    The partitions of a given set stand in a well known one-to-onecorrespondence with the equivalence relations on that set. We askwhether anything analogous to partitions can be found which correspondin a like manner to the similarity relations (reflexive, symmetricrelations) on a set, and show that (what we call) decompositions – of acertain kind – play this role. A key ingredient in the discussion is akind of closure relation (analogous to the consequence relationsconsidered in formal logic) having nothing especially to do (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  11.  3
    Lloyd Humberstone (2011). On a Conservative Extension Argument of Dana Scott. Logic Journal of the Igpl 19 (1):241-288.
    Exegesis, analysis and discussion of an argument deployed by Dana Scott in his 1973 paper ‘Background to Formalization’, rovide an ideal setting for getting clear about some subtleties in the apparently simple idea of conservative extension. There, Scott claimed in respect of two fundamental principles concerning implication that any generalized consequence relation respecting these principles is always extended conservatively by some similarly fundamental principles concerning conjunction and disjunction. This claim appears on the face of it to conflict with cases (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12. Lloyd Humberstone (2010). Smiley's Distinction Between Rules of Inference and Rules of Proof. In T. J. Smiley, Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.), The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge 107--126.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  13.  43
    Lloyd Humberstone (2013). Replacement in Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (1):49-89.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  1
    Lloyd Humberstone (2005). Béziau's Translation Paradox. Theoria 71 (2):138-181.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  15.  23
    Lloyd Humberstone & Herman Cappelen (2006). Sufficiency and Excess. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):265-320.
    This paper assembles examples and considerations bearing on such questions as the following. Are statements to the effect that someone is too young (for instance) or that someone is old enough always to be understood in terms of someone's being too young or too old for such-and-such-for example, for them to join a particular organization? And when a 'such-and-such' has been specified, is it always at least tacitly modal in force-in the case just given, too young or old enough to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  16.  26
    Lloyd Humberstone (2008). Béziau's Translation Paradox. Theoria 71 (2):138-181.
    Jean-Yves Béziau (‘Classical Negation can be Expressed by One of its Halves’, Logic Journal of the IGPL 7 (1999), 145–151) has given an especially clear example of a phenomenon he considers a sufficiently puzzling to call the ‘paradox of translation’: the existence of pairs of logics, one logic being strictly weaker than another and yet such that the stronger logic can be embedded within it under a faithful translation. We elaborate on Béziau’s example, which concerns classical negation, as well as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  17.  3
    S. Chopra, A. G. Cohn, R. P. de Freitas, H. Field, A. Ghose, L. Goble, V. Halbach, L. Humberstone, N. Kamide & S. Kovac (2003). Benevides, MRF, 343 Berk, L., 323 Boėr, SE, 43 Calabrese, PG. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (669).
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  18.  16
    Lloyd Humberstone (1986). Extensionality in Sentence Position. Journal of Philosophical Logic 15 (1):27 - 54.
  19.  8
    Lloyd Humberstone (2002). The Modal Logic of Agreement and Noncontingency. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 43 (2):95-127.
    The formula A (it is noncontingent whether A) is true at a point in a Kripke model just in case all points accessible to that point agree on the truth-value of A. We can think of -based modal logic as a special case of what we call the general modal logic of agreement, interpreted with the aid of models supporting a ternary relation, S, say, with OA (which we write instead of A to emphasize the generalization involved) true at a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  20.  22
    Lloyd Humberstone (2000). Contra-Classical Logics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (4):438 – 474.
    Only propositional logics are at issue here. Such a logic is contra-classical in a superficial sense if it is not a sublogic of classical logic, and in a deeper sense, if there is no way of translating its connectives, the result of which translation gives a sublogic of classical logic. After some motivating examples, we investigate the incidence of contra-classicality (in the deeper sense) in various logical frameworks. In Sections 3 and 4 we will encounter, originally as an example of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  21.  42
    Lloyd Humberstone (2011). Variation on a Trivialist Argument of Paul Kabay. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (1):115-132.
    Impossible worlds are regarded with understandable suspicion by most philosophers. Here we are concerned with a modal argument which might seem to show that acknowledging their existence, or more particularly, the existence of some hypothetical (we do not say “possible”) world in which everything was the case, would have drastic effects, forcing us to conclude that everything is indeed the case—and not just in the hypothesized world in question. The argument is inspired by a metaphysical (rather than modal-logical) argument of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  37
    Lloyd Humberstone (2013). Logical Relations. Philosophical Perspectives 27 (1):175-230.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  26
    Lloyd Humberstone (2007). Modal Logic for Other-World Agnostics: Neutrality and Halldén Incompleteness. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (1):1 - 32.
    The logic of 'elsewhere,' i.e., of a sentence operator interpretable as attaching to a formula to yield a formula true at a point in a Kripke model just in case the first formula is true at all other points in the model, has been applied in settings in which the points in question represent spatial positions (explaining the use of the word 'elsewhere'), as well as in the case in which they represent moments of time. This logic is applied here (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24.  14
    Lloyd Humberstone (2000). An Intriguing Logic with Two Implicational Connectives. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 41 (1):1-40.
    Matthew Spinks [35] introduces implicative BCSK-algebras, expanding implicative BCK-algebras with an additional binary operation. Subdirectly irreducible implicative BCSK-algebras can be viewed as flat posets with two operations coinciding only in the 1- and 2-element cases, each, in the latter case, giving the two-valued implication truth-function. We introduce the resulting logic (for the general case) in terms of matrix methodology in §1, showing how to reformulate the matrix semantics as a Kripke-style possible worlds semantics, thereby displaying the distinction between the two (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  25.  5
    Lloyd Humberstone (2012). Minimally Congruential Contexts: Observations and Questions on Embedding E in K. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 53 (4):581-598.
    Recently, an improvement in respect of simplicity was found by Rohan French over extant translations faithfully embedding the smallest congruential modal logic (E) in the smallest normal modal logic (K). After some preliminaries, we explore the possibility of further simplifying the translation, with various negative findings (but no positive solution). This line of inquiry leads, via a consideration of one candidate simpler translation whose status was left open earlier, to isolating the concept of a minimally congruential context. This amounts, roughly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26.  16
    Lloyd Humberstone (2007). Identical Twins, Deduction Theorems, and Pattern Functions: Exploring the Implicative BCsK Fragment of S. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (5):435 - 487.
    We recapitulate (Section 1) some basic details of the system of implicative BCSK logic, which has two primitive binary implicational connectives, and which can be viewed as a certain fragment of the modal logic S5. From this modal perspective we review (Section 2) some results according to which the pure sublogic in either of these connectives (i.e., each considered without the other) is an exact replica of the material implication fragment of classical propositional logic. In Sections 3 and 5 we (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  59
    Lloyd Humberstone (2008). Contrariety and Subcontrariety: The Anatomy of Negation (with Special Reference to an Example of J.-Y. Béziau). Theoria 71 (3):241-262.
    We discuss aspects of the logic of negation bearing on an issue raised by Jean-Yves Béziau, recalled in §1. Contrary- and subcontrary-forming operators are introduced in §2, which examines some of their logical behaviour, leading on naturally to a consideration in §3 of dual intuitionistic negation (as well as implication), and some further operators related to intuitionistic negation. In §4, a historical explanation is suggested as to why some of these negation-related connectives have attracted more attention than others. The remaining (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. Lloyd Humberstone (2009). Logical Pluralism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):162 – 168.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Lloyd Humberstone (2008). Modal Formulas True at Some Point in Every Model. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 6:70-82.
    In a paper on the logical work of the Jains, Graham Priest considers a consequence relation, semantically characterized, which has a natural analogue in modal logic. Here we give a syntactic/axiomatic description of the modal formulas which are consequences of the empty set by this relation, which is to say: those formulas which are, for every model, true at some point in that model.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  18
    Lloyd Humberstone (2001). The Pleasures of Anticipation: Enriching Intuitionistic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 30 (5):395-438.
    We explore a relation we call 'anticipation' between formulas, where A anticipates B (according to some logic) just in case B is a consequence (according to that logic, presumed to support some distinguished implicational connective →) of the formula A → B. We are especially interested in the case in which the logic is intuitionistic (propositional) logic and are much concerned with an extension of that logic with a new connective, written as "a", governed by rules which guarantee that for (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31.  7
    Lloyd Humberstone (2006). Variations on a Theme of Curry. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 47 (1):101-131.
    After an introduction to set the stage, we consider some variations on the reasoning behind Curry's Paradox arising against the background of classical propositional logic and of BCI logic and one of its extensions, in the latter case treating the "paradoxicality" as a matter of nonconservative extension rather than outright inconsistency. A question about the relation of this extension and a differently described (though possibly identical) logic intermediate between BCI and BCK is raised in a final section, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  32.  4
    I. Düntsch, G. F. Díez, K. Fine, M. Gómez-Torrente, S. M. Glaister, L. Goble, T. Hailperin, S. O. Hansson, L. Humberstone & T. Hyttinen (2000). Antonelli, GA, 277 Bamber, D., 1 Bell, JL, 585 Correia, F., 295. Journal of Philosophical Logic 29 (637).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  33.  55
    L. Humberstone & D. Makinson (2012). Intuitionistic Logic and Elementary Rules. Mind 120 (480):1035-1051.
    The interplay of introduction and elimination rules for propositional connectives is often seen as suggesting a distinguished role for intuitionistic logic. We prove three formal results concerning intuitionistic propositional logic that bear on that perspective, and discuss their significance. First, for a range of connectives including both negation and the falsum, there are no classically or intuitionistically correct introduction rules. Second, irrespective of the choice of negation or the falsum as a primitive connective, classical and intuitionistic consequence satisfy exactly the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  26
    Lloyd Humberstone & Timothy Williamson (1997). Inverses for Normal Modal Operators. Studia Logica 59 (1):33-64.
    Given a 1-ary sentence operator , we describe L - another 1-ary operator - as as a left inverse of in a given logic if in that logic every formula is provably equivalent to L. Similarly R is a right inverse of if is always provably equivalent to R. We investigate the behaviour of left and right inverses for taken as the operator of various normal modal logics, paying particular attention to the conditions under which these logics are conservatively extended (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  22
    Lloyd Humberstone (2003). Note on Contraries and Subcontraries. Noûs 37 (4):690–705.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  13
    Lloyd Humberstone (2004). Yet Another "Choice of Primitives" Warning: Normal Modal Logics. Logique Et Analyse 47.
  37.  8
    Lloyd Humberstone (2005). For Want of an 'And': A Puzzle About Non-Conservative Extension. History and Philosophy of Logic 26 (3):229-266.
    Section 1 recalls a point noted by A. N. Prior forty years ago: that a certain formula in the language of a purely implicational intermediate logic investigated by R. A. Bull is unprovable in that logic but provable in the extension of the logic by the usual axioms for conjunction, once this connective is added to the language. Section 2 reminds us that every formula is interdeducible with (i.e. added to intuitionistic logic, yields the same intermediate logic as) some conjunction-free (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38.  33
    Lloyd Humberstone (2008). Can Every Modifier Be Treated as a Sentence Modifier? Philosophical Perspectives 22 (1):241-275.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Lloyd Humberstone (1983). The Background of Circumstances. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64:19-34.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  40.  2
    Lloyd Humberstone (2008). Replacing Modus Ponens With One-Premiss Rules. Logic Journal of the Igpl 16 (5):431-451.
    After some motivating remarks in Section 1, in Section 2 we show how to replace an axiomatic basis for any one of a broad range of sentential logics having finitely many axiom schemes and Modus Ponens as the sole proper rule, by a basis with the same axiom schemes and finitely many one-premiss rules. Section 3 mentions some questions arising from this replacement procedure , explores another such procedure, and discusses some aspects of the consequence relations associated with the different (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  3
    Lloyd Humberstone (2009). Collapsing Modalities. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 50 (2):119-132.
    Sections 1 and 2 respectively raise and settle the question of whether, if an affirmative modality collapses (reduces to the null modality, that is) in a normal modal logic, then all modalities of the same length collapse in that logic, while Section 3 considers some special cases of an analogous phenomenon for congruential modal logics, closing with a general question about collapsing modalities in this broader range of logics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  16
    Lloyd Humberstone (2000). What Fa Says About A. Dialectica 54 (1):3–28.
    A sentence mentioning an object can be regarded as saying any one of several things about that object, without thereby being ambiguous. Some of the (logical) repercussions of this commonplace observation are recorded, and some critical discussion is provided of views which would appear to go against it.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  18
    Lloyd Humberstone (2007). Investigations Into a Left-Structural Right-Substructural Sequent Calculus. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 16 (2):141-171.
    We study a multiple-succedent sequent calculus with both of the structural rules Left Weakening and Left Contraction but neither of their counterparts on the right, for possible application to the treatment of multiplicative disjunction (fission, ‘cotensor’, par) against the background of intuitionistic logic. We find that, as Hirokawa dramatically showed in a 1996 paper with respect to the rules for implication, the rules for this connective render derivable some new structural rules, even though, unlike the rules for implication, these rules (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  28
    Lloyd Humberstone & Aubrey Townsend (1994). Co-Instantiation and Identity. Philosophical Studies 74 (2):243 - 272.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45.  41
    Frank Jackson & Lloyd Humberstone (1982). On a Challenge by Anderson and Belnap. Analysis 42 (4):179 - 181.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  26
    Lloyd Humberstone (2005). Geach's Categorial Grammar. Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (3):281 - 317.
    Geach’s rich paper ‘A Program for Syntax’ introduced many ideas into the arena of categorial grammar, not all of which have been given the attention they warrant in the thirty years since its first publication. Rather surprisingly, one of our findings (Section 3 below) is that the paper not only does not contain a statement of what has widely come to be known as “Geach’s Rule”, but in fact presents considerations which are inimical to the adoption of the rule in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  16
    Lloyd Humberstone (1995). Names and Pseudonyms. Philosophy 70 (274):487 - 512.
    Was there such a person as Lewis Carroll? An affirmative answer is suggested by the thought that Lewis Carroll was Charles Dodgson, and since there was certainly such a person as Charles Dodgson, there was such a person as Lewis Carroll. A negative answer is suggested by the thought that in arguing thus, the two names ‘Lewis Carroll’ and ‘Charles Dodgson’ are being inappropriately treated as though they were completely on a par: a pseudonym is, after all, a false or (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  7
    Lloyd Humberstone (2014). Prior’s OIC Nonconservativity Example Revisited. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 24 (3):209-235.
    In his 1964 note, ‘Two Additions to Positive Implication’, A. N. Prior showed that standard axioms governing conjunction yield a nonconservative extension of the pure implicational intermediate logic OIC of R. A. Bull. Here, after reviewing the situation with the aid of an adapted form of the Kripke semantics for intuitionistic and intermediate logics, we proceed to illuminate this example by transposing it to the setting of modal logic, and then relate it to the propositional logic of what have been (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  13
    Lloyd Humberstone (2003). False Though Partly True – an Experiment in Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (6):613-665.
    We explore in an experimental spirit the prospects for extending classical propositional logic with a new operator P intended to be interpreted when prefixed to a formula as saying that formula in question is at least partly true. The paradigm case of something which is, in the sense envisaged, false though still "partly" true is a conjunction one of whose conjuncts is false while the other is true. Ideally, we should like such a logic to extend classical logic - or (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  21
    Lloyd Humberstone (2013). Inverse Images of Box Formulas in Modal Logic. Studia Logica 101 (5):1031-1060.
    We investigate, for several modal logics but concentrating on KT, KD45, S4 and S5, the set of formulas B for which ${\square B}$ is provably equivalent to ${\square A}$ for a selected formula A (such as p, a sentence letter). In the exceptional case in which a modal logic is closed under the (‘cancellation’) rule taking us from ${\square C \leftrightarrow \square D}$ to ${C \leftrightarrow D}$ , there is only one formula B, to within equivalence, in this inverse image, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 89