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  1. L. M. Reder, H. Park & P. D. Kieffaber (2009). Memory Systems Do Not Divide on Consciousness: Reinterpreting Memory in Terms of Activation and Binding. Psychological Bulletin 135 (1).
    There is a popular hypothesis that performance on implicit and explicit memory tasks reflects 2 distinct memory systems. Explicit memory is said to store those experiences that can be consciously recollected, and implicit memory is said to store experiences and affect subsequent behavior but to be unavailable to conscious awareness. Although this division based on awareness is a useful taxonomy for memory tasks, the authors review the evidence that the unconscious character of implicit memory does not necessitate that it be (...)
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  2. M. K. Spehn & L. M. Reder (2000). The Unconscious Feeling of Knowing: A Commentary on Koriat's Paper. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):187-192.
    In Koriat's paper ''The Feeling of Knowing: Some Metatheoretical Implications for Consciousness and Control,'' he asserts that the feeling of knowing straddles the implicit and explicit, and that these conscious feelings enter into a conscious control process that is necessary for controlled behavior. This assertion allows him to make many speculations on the nature of consciousness itself. We agree that feelings of knowing are produced through a monitoring of one's knowledge, and that this monitoring can affect the control of behavior (...)
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  3. L. M. Reder (1996). Implicit Memory and Metacognition. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    The editor of this volume takes it to mean that a prior experience affects behavior without the individual's appreciation (ability to report) of this...
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  4. L. M. Reder & C. D. Schunn (1996). Metacognition Does Not Imply Awareness: Strategy Choice is Governed by Implicit Learning and Memory. In , Implicit Memory and Metacognition. Lawrence Erlbaum.